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16

If its deep enough that merely wiping it doesn't remove it, the scuff is deeper than just the very top surface of your paint. First, try Meguiars Scratch-x with a microfiber cloth. Rub it in. Try two or three passes to see if this removes the scuff mark. Doing so by hand won't remove any of your paint unless its been compromised (cracked, flaking, ...


8

Definitely worry about the quote including blending in of the paint (or the lack thereof). With metallic paint, if you only paint the panel that is getting replaced, you will be able to see that the panels seem to be a different color under certain light because the reflection of the metallic particles in the paint occurs at a different angle between the ...


8

Clean the stickers and the immediate surroundings using a strong solution of car all purpose cleaner and water or car shampoo (without wax!) and water. Warm the sticker with a hairdryer or a hot air gun to about 30 degrees Celcius. Start peeling of the sticker gently, you might want to use some thing plastic tool like a plastic putty knife of an ATM card or ...


7

Before you do anything else, try some goo-gone. This should remove any paint from the other vehicle, without affecting the paint on your car. (If you're really concerned about it affecting your paint, you could try it in a small, inconspicuous area, but I've done this on a number of cars with no ill effects). If after removing the paint, you can still see ...


7

Regular washing and waxing is your best bet. We kept our cars in one piece through the Rochester, NY winters with nothing more than this. The wax provides a sacrificial protective coating for the painted parts of the body. You can apply wax to your wheels as well. As a bonus, the brake dust will be easier to wash off of a waxed wheel. Then wash, wash, ...


7

Is there ever a case where only one would need to be replaced? Sure: rust will kill anything but it does tend to start at a point of entry and spread. It could kill one strut before it dissolves the rest of the car. Likewise, a side or corner impact could bend a single strut. how can I test which one needs replacing if this is the case? Realistically, ...


6

Wash off the salt whenever possible. Inspect the car regularly (especially in locations where salt and water can get trapped). Repair any noticable damage immediately (damaged paint, damaged undercoating, etc). Set aside some spare funds in the anticipation of such repairs. My experience is that body panels don't rust, it's the strut towers, floor, and ...


5

You could try auto detailing clay (aka clay bar). It is a slightly abrasive clay material that is used to remove surface contaminants. This is the most gentle (non-chemical) solution you can try. Admittedly, it may be too gentle for this. If that doesn't work, you may have to step up to liquid polish. You can technically use a fine grained sandpaper on ...


5

Only an old-time expert bodyman could fix those dents with traditional techniques like hammer and dolly and heat to shrink the metal. However, the amount of skill and experience needed is on the order of master craftsman, not novice. A modern pro would replace the door or re-skin it. To answer your question, your best bet is to hammer down the high-spots ...


5

The dealerships I worked at would take it off at the request of the customer. It's simple you're the customer and the salesman isn't going to lose a sale over the sticker. If you have already bought the car or just aren't comfortable asking them to do it you can DIY by following this post.


5

It has been my experience that the gas struts are similar to headlights. Occasionally one will fail early, but most of the time the second unit fails shortly after the first. If only one side is replaced it will take the load of the weaker side. This causes it to wear prematurely as it is carrying more than half the load. Also remember that any extra weight ...


5

They simply pop off. Gently pry them off, the spring holding it on the ball is internal. EDIT: (Adding some descriptive pics for Larry) Place a large flat tip screwdriver where the red arrow is at. In the image below, the green flat piece is the screwdriver. Place one side of it at the base of the post. Place the other at on the rod. Twist it as shown ...


4

Most do, yes - It is free advertising for them. Round here it is usually a sticker in the rear window, but I have seen some dealers put something on the back panel. They also put their details on the licence plate (a legal requirement in the UK for anyone supplying plates) I suspect that if you asked them not to, the sales person would say "Yeah, sure", ...


4

I don't think either tool would be suitable, especially if you don't have any experience doing bodywork. The first one needs a fairly large reasonably flat area to attach itself to and given the way the metal is caved in you might end up pulling at the wrong point. The slide hammer needs the 'nails' welding to the metal so unless you have the tools for ...


4

The main thing I look for when I am picking any service provider is reputation. Usually you can find a provider that is recommended by their customers. For custom car wraps I would look for quality of the designs and the wrap itself. I would also look for durability. As for the application of the wrap, http://roadragedesigns.com/installation.html has ...


4

The firewall is typically made up of metal with a layer of fire retardant material. There are holes through the firewall for necessary pipes, wires etc from the engine bay to the passenger compartment. With old cars (much older than a Mazda 323) I have seen heavily rusted firewalls, but not seen anything like that recently. It certainly shouldn't be a ...


4

Manufacturers do sometimes use epoxy resin (or something like that) to attach spoilers and fenders. Mostly because it doesn't require drilling, which is a weak spot where rust can start to form, but also to form a nice aerodynamic seal. But then, you can never trust a secondhand car dealer and it may be that they had stuck on a wing/fender that had come off. ...


3

Are you sure it's the hinge, and not the body panels? Remember that modern cars are designed with crumple zones to absorb energy. If the gap around the fuel door is not even, and matching what it was originally like, I would have the car checked out by a body shop. I believe that modern shops will have a frame straightening device that can measure ...


3

Lay down and look under the bumper. Compare the damaged side to the undamaged side. One or more of the clips or screws that hold the bumper in place may have been broken or bent. If you can't see an obvious problem, then you can look up instructions in a repair manual for removing the bumper. Those will show you where all the attachment points are. Barring ...


3

Years ago we used something called "red putty" it is made by 3M available at autobody supply shops.. It was applied over the bondo. It acted like a thick primer that came in a can. It was smoother and thinner than filler so the edges feathered smoother.


3

I assume you mean the chrome piece, if so there are clips that must hold on to frame. If the clips were damaged, you might need to replace them. Can you show a picture of the bottom, as its been a while since I replaced one of them.


3

Patience and attention to detail would be the most important attributes. The knowledge is secondary to having those particular character traits.


3

3M Weatherstrip adhesive is the way to go. I assume you've checked to ensure that it originally was glued, and not clipped in. Some rubber gaskets use small plastic pins inserted into a hole in the rubber that snap into the door.


3

Mr. Clean magic eraser and water worked better than anything mentioned above. It takes a while, but there is zero chance of harming the painted surface since it is not an abrasive. I removed horrendous amounts of paint due to encounters with a short yellow bollard and a white stucco house. The scrapes were so severe that they left scratches on the plastic ...


3

I decided to go ahead trying to repair it, and I'm happy with the results. After bending the rusted metal back into shape, I started out using 40-grit sandpaper and a Dremel with a rust removal brush to remove paint and the brittle rust. Then I applied rust converter to what remained to prevent it from spreading. For reconstructing the rusted-out part of ...


3

I would believe most body shops will do the work with you bringing them the parts. I recently had to replace the bumper on my Mo-n-Law's car. I bought one online, took it to the body shop, they painted it, and I brought it home and installed it. They charged me a set price for getting it painted. There was no issue with them doing this. Since you said the ...


3

I contacted the official Honda dealer in New Zealand. They confirmed that I need to replace the entire assembly, rather than just the arm alone. They are not the "pop out" variety. The cost is NZD305 EACH, rather expensive. I contacted a local mechanic who said the same thing: need to replace whole assembly. He got a second hand one for NZD92, plus NZD28 ...


2

I usually just use a Steam Jenny basically a hot water pressure washer, starting at one edge working my way across the sticker. If you don't have access to that you can use a heat gun or hair drier to heat up the sticker and peal off the sticker starting at one edge keeping it at a 90 degree angle while doing so. You can also use a plastic putty knife or ...


2

I am in USA and not aware of some products mentioned. The basic idea is to use a very mild abrasive and a wax, both in the same product. I use Turtle Wax Chrome Polish. Just rub hard with a rag. The repaired area will match surrounding paint. Any minor scratches in your paint will remain, but all foreign paint will be cleanly removed without the dulling ...


2

That looks pretty bad - typically when I've seen ones get this corroded, they need to be sandblasted clear of rust, properly filled and then repainted. You should be able to keep sanding until all the rust is gone - if that leaves holes, you're better off knowing about them rather than having them hidden under rust. If the holes are too big, you can always ...



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