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1

Based on what Ben said (in a comment to my original question), I wet sanded it with 1500 grit, and then used a buffing/cutting compound (Meguiar's ultimate compound) and a LOT of elbow grease to buff it smooth. It still doesn't quite have the gloss of the original paint job, but definitely an improvement from before. It's noticeably less matte, and ...


2

So it certainly looks like that is an injection molded plastic piece. Its probably ABS, but it could be anything. The good news is that it doesn't look like it will get much movement in that area. You could do sheet metal style bondo (polyester resin) fix, sand and repaint repair. This isn't always wise on parts that have to remain flexible (e.g. a front ...


3

@IHNIWID .. Yes, the "color" coat(s) need to be wet-sanded aka "color sanded". And then thoroughly cleaned of sanding dust. This needs to be perfectly smooth before clear, even if it appears dull. The quality of a mirror, for instance, is not as dependent on the glass as much as the overall flatness of the silvering reflective coating or layer. I'm not a ...


1

Sandpaper and Rubbing Compound Once clear coat is applied you need to sand it with low grit wet and dry sand paper and then rub it out with low grit rubbing compound. This is how you will get it to shine. You will want to get some of this sandpaper in 1000 to 3000 grit levels as well as some rubbing and polishing compound. Start with 1000 grit sandpaper, ...


5

The likely cause is that the paint was applied too thin per coat or the nozzle was too far away. A coat thick enough to get a glossy sheen is seen but not too thick that runs develop is the proper technique. Practice on a similar surface is suggested. To fix it, sand the surface back to smooth with 600 grit sandpaper and then re-spray with three coats about ...



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