Hot answers tagged

10

Definitely worry about the quote including blending in of the paint (or the lack thereof). With metallic paint, if you only paint the panel that is getting replaced, you will be able to see that the panels seem to be a different color under certain light because the reflection of the metallic particles in the paint occurs at a different angle between the ...


8

You can, but probably not in the way you're thinking. You can't just go out and buy a can of "red spray paint", unless you are prepared to re-paint the whole car in that color or you really don't care about the results. This is because your car isn't "red" (for example), it's "Sierra Red (L D3V)". However, if you go to a professional paint supply shop you ...


7

Bodywork is something that cannot be rushed. While others are suggesting chemicals that may be suited for this application, it is not necessarily going to be a solution to your problem. The most important part of bodywork/painting is preparation and cleanliness. I cannot stress this enough. When applying bondo, fibreglass, spot putty, primer, paint, ...


6

That's the B-Pillar, the one at the front that the windshield is attached too is the A-Pillar, the one at the back after the rear door is the C-Pillar, if there was one behind that like in a station wagon or SUV it would be the D-Pillar and so on. More info here


6

tl;dr: You will almost certainly notice no effect at all other than the loss of fuel economy due to the increased weight. It is very unlikely that a splitter or diffuser will have any measurable benefit unless you are driving a car that is: Very low to the ground over a ... Very smooth surface at a ... Very high speed. Needless to say, the street is not ...


5

The right side looks like it has a small crease. You may be able to get it to look better but I don't think it will be perfect without some filling and painting. You can try covering the filler opening with some heavyduty plastic and installing the gascap. Hook the fuel outlet up to an air compressor. Gradually increase the pressure to see if the dent will ...


5

According to the Material Safety Data Sheet the hazardous ingredient is listed as Styrene. I would recommend you wear a respirator and some good gloves. Some import points from the MSDS: Signs of Overexposure: Nausea, cough, dizziness, weakness, headache, chest pain, lack of coordination, shortness of breath, dermatitis, redness and/or pain in eyes. ...


5

tl;dr: It depends on the ding. Try some cleaner wax, though: it won't make the problem worse. Did you scratch down to the primer or just leave some paint behind? If all you did was trade some paint between cars, you're going to need to polish it off. That said, if you're not comfortable with power polishing tools or abrasive polishes, I would counsel a ...


5

I recommend looking for a replacement side panel. Otherwise the standard panel beating approach is to try and hammer out the worst of the dents first. Car bog/filler/bondo is a last step to fill minor imperfections. This is harder than it sounds. Panels that have been creased or stretched seldom pop back to thier original position. Judging by your photo the ...


4

Sand down the paint around the hole, apply a few layers of zinc spray followed by a few layers of new paint (with primer, if necessary) with 1 or 2 layers of clearcoat on top. Make sure you cover the edges well and check the edge regularly to see if any rust occurs. Make sure you wait long enough between each layer for optimal protection, check the label ...


4

I don't think either tool would be suitable, especially if you don't have any experience doing bodywork. The first one needs a fairly large reasonably flat area to attach itself to and given the way the metal is caved in you might end up pulling at the wrong point. The slide hammer needs the 'nails' welding to the metal so unless you have the tools for ...


4

There are a few ways to resolve this dent issue. Method 1 glue these plastic ding tabs to the gas tank. You can find them by googling "plastic ding tab" You will use a hot glue gun and hot glue them to your gas tank. Use a dent puller slide hammer. The tip should screw into the plastic ding pullers. Pull the weight of the slide hammer to the bottom ...


4

I know from experience that the doors like to rust after about 7 years if you're not careful. I don't know of anything else except the usual problems like cracking radiators, blown headgaskets and broken main bearings (usually under #3 piston). Other things that go wrong include the main oil seal and the clutch. If you have a VF39 STI turbo, it might crack ...


4

I believe this is the part you need to worry about: It is the rear bumper support and can be found under the bumper cover. As far as how imperative it is to fix, it all depends on the amount of damage which was done. You really need to take the bumper cover off to get a good look at the damage to this piece. You could probably get away with not replacing ...


4

You can get it covered with epoxy primer. If you have many pits and cavities, it would be best to go over the areas with a wire brush and then shoot your primer. I recommend a wire brush for the pitted areas vs a typical sanding block as it will not penetrate areas with depth. If moisture is trapped in there, expect it to corrode through. It is best to ...


3

On most modern vehicles, the part of the bumper you see is just a facade and has no structural purpose. Often as a part it's just called "bumper cover" or similar. So I don't think the cracks should affect safety in any way. As for replacing it yourself, the hardest parts are: Finding all the fasteners to remove the old one. If the new one you buy isn't ...


3

To you question of finding which body shop is better. If everything was equal I would always pick an independent body shop over a dealer. In my experience dealers typically are overpriced and don't show as much care for a vehicle. For your situation, I would suggest looking for reviews of both places. Look at the addresses in Google Maps and see if ...


3

You can use some POR15 which will stop the rust from spreading. It is really good on surface rust. I'm currently using it on my 1987 Toyota Land Cruiser and works well!


3

It is a big job but I can't tell you how many hours it will take. The body shop looks up the cost in a estimating guide, and generates and estimate based on that. The differnce in shops is going to be in the parts used, dealer vs aftermarket, amount of parts mark up, the paint system used, and the labor rate the shop charges. Just know how long it should ...


3

Patience and attention to detail would be the most important attributes. The knowledge is secondary to having those particular character traits.


3

Years ago we used something called "red putty" it is made by 3M available at autobody supply shops.. It was applied over the bondo. It acted like a thick primer that came in a can. It was smoother and thinner than filler so the edges feathered smoother.


3

I would believe most body shops will do the work with you bringing them the parts. I recently had to replace the bumper on my Mo-n-Law's car. I bought one online, took it to the body shop, they painted it, and I brought it home and installed it. They charged me a set price for getting it painted. There was no issue with them doing this. Since you said the ...


3

Buy the used parts. $4500 is almost the price of an entire car. If you want to save lots of money, do the paint prep work yourself. You'll need to watch an instructional video on doing it properly, but it's basically LOTS of sanding with various grades of sandpaper and possibly filling dents in with body-filler. It's a long and tedious job, but you'll feel ...


3

Yeah you can add a flex agent if you think that's the case or you can make sure it's sanded rough and then do like 3 or 4 layers of paint. You could also sand it down further, and cover it with fiberglass or epoxy resin, then sand that and paint it.


3

You need to use a flexible body filler specifically intended for polyurethane bumpers. It looks like the filler you used has detached from the substrate due to flexing (which could be solely due to temperature and not impact). The filler you used was for small dent repair on non-flexible metal panels. Also, I don't know how big of an area you filled but the ...


3

I'm thinking you can do one of four things: Use a larger drill bit and make the hole bigger, though 5mm (half a centimeter) is a bit of a distance to do this. Use the right size of drill bit (same as threaded bolt width) somewhat like a mill and elongate it. To do this, you'd place the bit horizontal to the hole and work it up and down slowly while ...


3

Some of those parts are hard to do for a beginner. Making CF look good takes a lot of practice. Still, I'll try to steer you in the right direction. I would use honeycomb as the filler material. Cardboard gets messy quick. How many layers should I build up and will I need a filler material? Cosmetic parts: 1 X layer carbon fiber 1 X layer fiberglass No ...


3

Do you have a round backing object? My friend the armorer (as in steel plate) had a variety of objects for the backing, including an 8 inch solid steel ball welded to a stake (you probably won't need one of those if you re not making helmets.) The other trick is to not hit precisely on the point of contact with the backing object, but just off to one side. ...


2

Consider going to a detailer. It's amazing how much they can do without actually painting anything.


2

If you're really careful and it's flared outward, you can probably get away with getting a small hammer and tapping it back into shape. However, I can't quite tell from your picture as the deformation on the lower hole looks to be more than just flared. I'd insert the fastener into the hole and pay careful attention as to where the gaps are before deciding ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible