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8

Definitely worry about the quote including blending in of the paint (or the lack thereof). With metallic paint, if you only paint the panel that is getting replaced, you will be able to see that the panels seem to be a different color under certain light because the reflection of the metallic particles in the paint occurs at a different angle between the ...


7

You can, but probably not in the way you're thinking. You can't just go out and buy a can of "red spray paint", unless you are prepared to re-paint the whole car in that color or you really don't care about the results. This is because your car isn't "red" (for example), it's "Sierra Red (L D3V)". However, if you go to a professional paint supply shop you ...


6

That's the B-Pillar, the one at the front that the windshield is attached too is the A-Pillar, the one at the back after the rear door is the C-Pillar, if there was one behind that like in a station wagon or SUV it would be the D-Pillar and so on. More info here


5

The right side looks like it has a small crease. You may be able to get it to look better but I don't think it will be perfect without some filling and painting. You can try covering the filler opening with some heavyduty plastic and installing the gascap. Hook the fuel outlet up to an air compressor. Gradually increase the pressure to see if the dent will ...


5

According to the Material Safety Data Sheet the hazardous ingredient is listed as Styrene. I would recommend you wear a respirator and some good gloves. Some import points from the MSDS: Signs of Overexposure: Nausea, cough, dizziness, weakness, headache, chest pain, lack of coordination, shortness of breath, dermatitis, redness and/or pain in eyes. ...


4

tl;dr: It depends on the ding. Try some cleaner wax, though: it won't make the problem worse. Did you scratch down to the primer or just leave some paint behind? If all you did was trade some paint between cars, you're going to need to polish it off. That said, if you're not comfortable with power polishing tools or abrasive polishes, I would counsel a ...


4

Sand down the paint around the hole, apply a few layers of zinc spray followed by a few layers of new paint (with primer, if necessary) with 1 or 2 layers of clearcoat on top. Make sure you cover the edges well and check the edge regularly to see if any rust occurs. Make sure you wait long enough between each layer for optimal protection, check the label ...


4

I don't think either tool would be suitable, especially if you don't have any experience doing bodywork. The first one needs a fairly large reasonably flat area to attach itself to and given the way the metal is caved in you might end up pulling at the wrong point. The slide hammer needs the 'nails' welding to the metal so unless you have the tools for ...


3

It is a big job but I can't tell you how many hours it will take. The body shop looks up the cost in a estimating guide, and generates and estimate based on that. The differnce in shops is going to be in the parts used, dealer vs aftermarket, amount of parts mark up, the paint system used, and the labor rate the shop charges. Just know how long it should ...


3

I would believe most body shops will do the work with you bringing them the parts. I recently had to replace the bumper on my Mo-n-Law's car. I bought one online, took it to the body shop, they painted it, and I brought it home and installed it. They charged me a set price for getting it painted. There was no issue with them doing this. Since you said the ...


2

Yes, you can sand back to the primer everywhere, but I wouldn't make that the goal. The goal is to provide a smooth (but not too smooth!), level surface that the new paint can adhere to (and of course that adheres to the metal). In some places, that might require sanding back to the existing primer, or even bare metal if you need to do body work. Be ...


2

If you have the undercoat layer intact you should be fine, as it should prevent rust - but be very careful when you take it this far back. My recommendation would be to strip it back and then re-coat the primer/undercoat. That way you are protecting against areas where the moisture can get to bare metal. If you are in the UK you may have problems doing this ...


2

On most modern vehicles, the part of the bumper you see is just a facade and has no structural purpose. Often as a part it's just called "bumper cover" or similar. So I don't think the cracks should affect safety in any way. As for replacing it yourself, the hardest parts are: Finding all the fasteners to remove the old one. If the new one you buy isn't ...


2

Buy the used parts. $4500 is almost the price of an entire car. If you want to save lots of money, do the paint prep work yourself. You'll need to watch an instructional video on doing it properly, but it's basically LOTS of sanding with various grades of sandpaper and possibly filling dents in with body-filler. It's a long and tedious job, but you'll feel ...


1

I would assume not. Up here in Canada, our vehicle inspection is pretty lax, but Lambo-doors introduce a pretty big safety issue, and they are not allowed on the road. I have yet to see a kit that deals with the problem of a car that has been flipped. I believe that Lambo's have windshields that can be broken outwards in case of a rollover. Mercedes' ...


1

Get your hands on some good quality rubbing compound and wax (for afterward). You'll want to use the rubbing compound with a cloth to get all the scuff marks off and the wax will make it look good as new. You can also use Brasso (or whatever the shops in your country sells for polishing up brass).


1

Stopping at a body line or some other feature is a pretty standard trick that body shops use to make repairs cheaper. It's less work for them because they don't have to worry about blending in the paint finish and texture as much. Since it's on the inside of the roofrack, it isn't really noticeable on that seam. Someplace like the middle of the hood would be ...


1

It appears that your best bet is to search for door lock buttons. Using that search, I see a long list of parts that include the manual push buttons that you describe.


1

A VIN derivative on a bumper? Really? I find that hard to believe. Even if it's true, no offense, but really, who is going to check for matching numbers on a Ford Focus? Even if they did, they're going to check the engine and transmission, not the bumper. What they are going to check is the CarFax that is going to show the accident, at that point whether ...


1

To you question of finding which body shop is better. If everything was equal I would always pick an independent body shop over a dealer. In my experience dealers typically are overpriced and don't show as much care for a vehicle. For your situation, I would suggest looking for reviews of both places. Look at the addresses in Google Maps and see if ...


1

If you're really careful and it's flared outward, you can probably get away with getting a small hammer and tapping it back into shape. However, I can't quite tell from your picture as the deformation on the lower hole looks to be more than just flared. I'd insert the fastener into the hole and pay careful attention as to where the gaps are before deciding ...



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