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14

While regular maintenance is not required it is advisable to check how much the chain has stretch, say every few 100K. If the chain stretches too much the tensioner may no longer be able to perform its job. There's also the problem of the pins becoming a bit loose in the side plates. The chain should also get a visual check whenever the opportunity presents ...


9

What is a shock absorber? I'm going to answer the basic title question with a carefully selected quote from the great Wikipedia: ... their intended sole purpose is to dampen spring oscillations. Think of how you want your car to ride when driving down a smooth road that has a bump or pothole. You expect to feel a mild jolt when the car travels ...


9

Model number differentiates the power (and usually size of the engine) of the car. You can often expect that car with a larger model number will have better optional equipment (it is valid for BMW 7 series models, perhaps series 3 and 5 have the same tendency). Models with bigger engines usually have different (stronger) suspension and stronger brakes. They ...


9

This be what the internet gives me. I have never owned a BMW but I hope this helps. In the picture look for the red arrow and on your car look on the left rear side of the engine.


8

Red one is likely to be for a pull hitch. If you get stuck you can insert a screw with the hoop on the end and it will allow someone to pull you out with a chain or winch, putting load in the appropriate place (not the bumper). The screw device is probably in your trunk somewhere. From the owners manual


8

On most bikes the carb has an overflow port that drains through a tube to the ground. This is important if the float sticks. Usually you can tap the float bowl with a screwdriver and unstick it, but if it happens again, overhaul the carbs. Also, don't smoke around a bike that's dripping gas.


8

Sounds to me like your starter motor is on the way out, as you are getting enough power, as a bump start is working, and sometimes you are able to start normally. This isn't that uncommon - they do take a lot of stress and load, and the internal friction can end up being too high for them to cope with. A temporary fix I have used in the past is to whack ...


7

If you are not familiar with the electrical system I would get a referal to a good shop familiar with BMW's. They may have seen it before or at least recognize what caused it. This a case where it must be determined if your melted wires were the cause or the result of another problem. Just installing another harness may result in the same melted wires. The ...


6

The very first thing that you should check is whether you actually made a mistake and, if so, which one. A cap that says "ATF oil only" is for automatic transmission fluid. If you're adding engine oil to the transmission, that's going to make your transmission very unhappy. It is fixable: you'll need to drain the transmission fluid and replace it. If ...


5

A lot of BMWs have a noise, but it might be a pump going bad. If I remember right, the lines are right under the reservoir. Check them for softness, and if they are soft/chewy I guess you can replace them. If it's a pump, run until it pops, as they are like $400. As far as the lines from the rack, those are hard lines, and unless clearly pinched not sure if ...


5

The e46 has a central jack point in the middle/front of the car, between the front wheels (red circle). Just make sure you use a block of wood between the jack and jack pad to help distribute the force a little.


5

I'm used to timing chains on American V8's, but they will "stretch" over time (think 200k miles) and sometimes on high mileage engines they could "jump" a tooth if they are too stretched out. But they do not require any maintenance.


5

You probably have a wheel out of balance and it's difficult to determine that without putting the tires on a balancer. One thing you could try would be to jack up the car and put pencil on a stationary object like a brick or a board move the pencil so it almost touches the wheel, spin the tire and look for the rim moving in and out in reference with the ...


5

You have probably already done this, but check your oil levels or you may end up with a seized engine. The "red engine oil" light is a a warning that oil pressure is too low, which is usually caused by lack of oil. Brian Knoblauch in the comments below points out that a faulty oil pump can also cause the oil pressure to drop.


5

As other people have already pointed out, the warning light is the oil pressure warning light so you really need to get to the bottom of this, especially if the light comes on at any other engine speed than idle. I think the culprits - especially if the problem started shortly after an oil change - could be (in decreasing order of likelyhood): Oil ...


4

The BMW power steering reservoir's usually say "ATF Only" on the caps as well.


4

My bike does this every couple of years after storage over winter. I have found that the float obsorbs some fuel and thus the level overfills. I have adjusted it some (hard to get right on mine) but the best bet for me was to replace the float. Either way, it should NOT drip or leak fuel. I have not seen any BMW at the shop I worked at leak except as I ...


4

The best BMW e46 manual that you will likely be able to purchase is the Bentley e46 technical guide. It's big, heavy, and expensive ($75 to $100) but it's well worth it. While you might be able to find information online about a particular repair procedure, but this manual covers everything in detail, with lots of diagrams and pictures. It's so much better ...


4

My power-steering pump failed about 2 months after the noise you described. I'm in an E46 3 Series. The noise would be louder when turning at a slower speed than it would at a higher speed. Dealer labour and part came to $1600 CAD, warranty saved me there.


4

Yes but as of present there are no US based tuners that provide a DPF delete kit or engine tuning (reprogramming) to allow the safe removal of this device. They exist overseas in the UK and Europe but I would hold off until someone in the US provides a product specific to the US car. Also the US spec 335d uses a DEF (diesel exhaust fluid, adblue, urea ...


4

You should be able to get the battery changed, either by an automotive locksmith or by your nearest BMW dealer. The batteries are usually standard coin cells, but I wouldn't try changing one without checking first as you might find it will need to be re-programmed afterwards. Try a locksmith first as they will probably be a lot cheaper than BMW!


4

I know my vehicle is equipped with a battery load monitor. When the computer (I assume the body control module) senses a load above some factory set value for more than 10 minutes with the engine off, it disables the power circuit. To reset it requires cycling the ignition switch. Turn the key to start nothing happens, turning the key a second type returns ...


4

Simple answer - no more or less than other cars of their era (late 80s - early 90s). That was the age when cars started to get more complicated and electrical, so they are harder to fix than the previous generation, but much easier than a newer car with loads of electrics. The engine is all fairly accessible (especially if you get a 4-cylinder 316 or 318) ...


4

Go with the recommended oil. The manufacturer should know much more about the vehicle they designed than your mechanic friend. Here are the factory recommendations for the E34. This covers all engine options that were available for the E34 chassis. Viscosity : Cold climate: 5W-30 Mild climate: 10W-30 Warm or hot climate: 15W-50


4

Have the shop do whatever it takes to get the wheel off. Lug bolts are readily available and not too bad in price. If it's a lug that requires a special key and decent mechanic should be able to remove it even without the key. Some shops will tell you that it may damage the wheel in the process but as long as they pay attention to what they're doing then it ...


4

Manufacturers do sometimes use epoxy resin (or something like that) to attach spoilers and fenders. Mostly because it doesn't require drilling, which is a weak spot where rust can start to form, but also to form a nice aerodynamic seal. But then, you can never trust a secondhand car dealer and it may be that they had stuck on a wing/fender that had come off. ...


4

BMW's plan was for it to never be changed. Looking at some of the forums, I think advice given from this BMW site seems about spot-on: Well-l-l, I hate to say "never" but the point being, one often needs/wants to crack open & rebuild an engine for other reasons (ring/valve wear, main seals, etc.) by a quarter-million miles or so--at which time, check ...


4

From this PDF, it shows the difference and it's pretty easy to see. This is the IHKA control in the e46. It is an automatic control. This is the IHKR control in the e46 (with the radio above it). It is a manual control.


3

BMW timing chains are engineered for the life of the engine and never need maintenance or replaced. To prove that point BMW has always performed several long distance tests on its new engines before they are put on the market. Back in the 90s they took a e34 (5 series) and ran it over 2 million miles, just performing the standard maintenance. When they ...


3

It's not a service manual, but you can get technical drawings and parts lists from realoem. But if you're planning on doing anything beyond changing your wiper blades, get the Bentley manual. Sure, it's expensive for a book, but if it saves even one hour of a BMW mechanic's labor costs, you'll still come out ahead.



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