Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

Most likely cause for this is that you have some condensation built up overnight on either the belt or one of the pulley wheels, and until this has evaporated the belt will be able to slip a little, causing a squeak. Once the engine warms up, the condensation is gone. With a new, well tensioned belt, this shouldn't matter, however belts age and stretch, ...


10

The main cause of a squeaky belt is the rubber has stretched causing a reduction in friction allowing the slippage to occur. There are two ways to solve the problem: Tighten the belt by using the appropriate tensioning technique (generally loosening the bolt that hold the pulleys in position, realigning the now-loosened pulley & retightening the ...


8

V belts are traditionally found in older motors, where you would have a series of those belts coming off the crankshaft, each to their own individual accessory group (alternator, a/c compressor, etc). See how the belts are staggered? Serpentine belts are much thicker by comparison and generally unify all accessories under one belt system.


7

Firstly, the comments made by others are correct. The power used by each of the components listed will vary on a component by component basis and even on an installation by installation basis. The power used by each component will also vary depending on the speed that it is running at. Also the number and type of components will vary from car to car. With ...


6

Very carefully hold a large crayon,yellow works best, like a lumber yard might use against the edge of the belt while the motor is running.If the squeel stops you know its an alignment problem.The wax in the crayon will lubricate the belt and stop the noise.Try one side then the other.If you are lucky the yellow will be left on the misaligned pulley and show ...


6

Checking the run-out of the crankshaft is pretty straight forward. A dial indicator is temporarily mounted to a fixed point close to the crank. The indicator arm is set to touch the crankshaft. While turning the crankshaft by hand you will get a reading on the indicator of how many thousands of an inch the crankshaft is moving off of center. Your mechanic ...


5

Unless the compressor is on a belt by itself, you don't want to remove the belt. Water pumps, alternators and power steering are nice things to have. An A/C delete/bypass pulley for your application would be a way to go, but it will involve pulling the compressor. Probably the easiest thing to do is locate the appropriate relay and pull it. If it's the ...


5

It sounds to me like it was just worn out. You should be able to turn the alternator and a/c compressor pulleys by hand. I'd replace the tensioner if it hasn't been done already anyway, and with a new tensioner, fitting a new belt should be fairly easy* as you can fit it with the tensioner un-tensioned. However, if the auxiliary belt hasn't been changed ...


4

Assuming the belt has correct tension and still squeaks it's rare to find anything more than a short term solution, other than replacing it. However, if you really want to give something a try, most industrial suppliers can sell you a can of "belt grip" compound, which is sprayed onto the contact surfaces of the belt and/or pulleys while they're rotating ...


4

Alternators aren't built for one engine so the manufacturer can't possibly know the gearing / ratio between the alternator and the engine. Therefore the RPM listed in the spec will be the RPM for the alternator. To calculate the alternators RPM you will need to find the diameter of the alternator pully [a] and the one connected to (presumably) the ...


3

So, bear with me on this and maybe I can help. Mind you, none of what I'm going to say is going to be easy to do, but that is because your issue is not an easy one to solve. The main problems I see here with any solution is alignment and distance from any mounting point I can discern. My main thought here is you need to get the alternator connected back to ...


3

You have partially answered this yourself- you are seeing smoke, which implies the bearings are getting hot. So they could start a fire. Or in seizing up the fan could cause your wiring to catch fire. Or you could end up with a cabin full of dangerous fumes... etc You could do permanent damage, yes. Pay close attention and you might be okay. Personally, ...


3

V belts also derive their name from the cross-section of the belt itself. In the first photo above a V belt will ride in grooves on the pulleys. Serpentine belts don't have this same cross-section because as you can see in the 2nd photo both sides of the belt come in contact with various pulleys. Get ready for some awesome ASCII artwork of a V belt cross ...


2

If you don't have time to deal with it you can try the belt dressing, but I do not recommend it. I've had it happen plenty of times and it has been caused by improper tensioning (too loose). Find out what the proper deflection should be using your shop manual (a must have for proper diy maintenance) and set it. You can purchase a gage, but in my experience ...


2

I would suggest a new shop. It takes a special kind of incompetence to try the same thing 8 times and expect different results. A squeal can be caused by misaligned pulleys, although I've never experienced it. Here is a link describing this on an older Sierra where the power steering pulley is misaligned. Maybe the same deal is possible your water pump ...


2

It's quite possible it just broke due to age and wear. I have personally experienced that when the belt wasn't replaced on schedule. If you were in the vehicle when it broke the belt, I'd be surprised if you wouldn't have heard loud unpleasant noises or felt something if it broke due to something seizing up. If it just broke, all you would have noticed ...


2

I hate to answer my own question but did eventually figure it out. Here are the more complete steps to swap the belt: Prerequisite: locate a belt diagram or draw your own before starting. Remove the plastic engine cover using 10mm ratchet - this will allow easier access to the tensioner / belt on the left side of the engine. Find the bolt head that is ...


2

A Google search revealed several sources for a replacement final drive belt. Getting a replacement should not be a problem. If the current belt is more than five years old or the owner doesn't know how old it is I would replace it soon. The advantages of belt drive are less maintenance, no lubricant is slung off, like on a chain and they are quieter. The ...


1

I'm with R. I believe it's probably a slipping belt. Some cars are notorious for that if the exact OEM belt isn't used. My Mitsubishi is one of those. Off the shelf (even high end, "guaranteed not to slip" type) belts from parts stores like to slip and squeal even when tightened to spec. OEM works fine... That said, I did once have a very similar ...


1

It sounds like the belt tensioner. Note that the bearing can make noise while it is still performing correctly, maintaining tension on the belt. So the fact that the belt is new and that has proper tension does not exclude the possibility that the tensioner bearing is noisy. I should add that while the tensioner functions now, if it is making noise, it ...


1

The fact that the CO didn't know about the low coolant level was low worries me. It could be leaking coolant when warm (when the pressure is high enough to squeeze through a pinhole, or whatever), or the engine is burning a small amount of coolant. This could be a head gasket or intake gasket(s). One thing to be sure of is that you are reading the correct ...


1

All very good answers to this question, but the recent work brings up another possibility. Many belts will start to squeal if they come into contact with even one drop of coolant. The cooling system should be pressure tested to see if any of the hoses or the water pump were improperly installed. A slow leak would explain the 24 hours before the squeal ...


1

I eventually discovered there are basically two ways to do this. One is to use the part FossilizedCarlos mentioned, but you must also get an alternator spacer set, or else the brackets do not help much. I had previously purchased the bracket set but couldn't figure out how it was supposed to help. The spacer set is the missing link, although they are hard ...


1

If you have more than one belt in your car, you might need to determine which of the belts is squeaking. The quick and easy way to pinpoint the right belt is to pour a class of water on the belt with the engine idling. You'll probably have to be fairly accurate, since the belts are often close together. The sound should go away for a few seconds. Once you ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible