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11

There are tools available that can do the job without using a press: There are many more. The overall theme is the C-clamp like stile of pressing the bearing in and out. There is an old saying, there is a right tool for the job. These or a press is the right tool. There are other ways but you always run the risk of damaging the bearing, knuckle or both.


8

It might not be the tires so much as the alignment. If the bearing was worn but had "gotten settled" in a particular orientation, it might not have been noisy. Then you changed the alignment and started stressing it slightly differently, and now it's gotten loud. I wouldn't be too quick to blame the mechanic.


7

The two primary bearing types found on a crankshaft are roller bearings and plain bearings located on the main journals of a crankshaft. There are two types of journals on a crankshaft. Main Journal - Where the crankshaft main bearings would be located Rod/Offset Journal - Where the connecting rod bearings would be located Crankshaft Components Image ...


6

If the noise is only happening when the clutch is engaged (pedal out), it's not the throw out bearing. You'd only hear the noise when you push on the pedal. This is because the only time the throw out bearing is being used is when you are pushing the pedal down. It won't contact the clutch fingers any other time, and therefor cannot make noise with the ...


6

I don't think it's safe/wise to drive 80 miles on that. It needs to be put on a trailer and dragged home at son's expense (some insurances cover towing also, but 80 miles is a bit far. If you have a truck, maybe rent a trailer for the day)


6

My options would be to replace the shaft were it sits now. No fun as a "flat back" job but it is not very hard. Or tow it to a repair site. It does not look like it should be driven. A driveshaft that gets loose can cause lots of damage. Removing the shaft and driving without one in place is not an option as this would likely damage the dual pump drive ...


5

Since when a wheel bearing goes bad you can feel it more than you can hear it, and there usually isn't any deflection in the wheel itself until the bearing is pretty much shot, the way I usually check for the bad bearing is with an automotive stethoscope: What I do is this: Put the car up on jack stands Take the wheel off of the car (if you need to ...


5

Rubber tubing is a cheap alternative to a stethoscope. You can buy a couple feet of it for a couple dollars at any hardware store, just be careful where you point it. Thank Click & Clack for that, it worked for me.


4

Use an auto repair stethescope or even a long socket extension as a substitute to listen to each pulley when you start the car. If it's truly a bearing issue you'll hear it right away when you find the affected part.


4

To determine whether it's coming from the hub (and on which side), shift into neutral and lift the front of the car. (Set the parking brake and block the wheels very well!) Spin the wheel rapidly with your hand. You should be able to hear the same noise. To repair, usually you replace the hub. It is possible to repair a hub by repacking the bearings, but it ...


4

Just like any other bearing in any automotive engine, it needs a constant source of oil in order to keep spinning. It does this by utilizing oil galleries which are drilled throughout the block. These are fed oil from the oil pump, which draws oil (in most cases) from the oil pan reservoir. Since I know Small Block Chevrolet (GenI) engines, I'll use them as ...


4

I agree this sounds more like a brake pad issue than a wheel bearing issue. The main reason is, with a wheel bearing issue, you will feel it more than you'll hear it. When the wheel bearing is bad enough to hear it, it's to the point where it is a true safety issue and you shouldn't be driving it anymore. If it were the wheel bearing at this point, you'd ...


4

I've had this issue with cars fixed at my past shops. The old tires would mask the sound of the wheel bearing starting to go bad. New tires would suddenly make the sound stand out. Old tires can also affect the wheel bearing if their wear is uneven. They could put uneven pressure on the bearing as the tire rotates. Could the shop have done it? There is a ...


3

This is a bit of a difficult question to answer over the internet because none of us can physically be there to observe the symptoms you're describing. However though, cars are just like any other man made functional device used on a daily basis. You could go in for an oil change and your piston rod bearing could fail. Is this the lube shop's fault? There is ...


3

Sounds more like brake pads are worn out. But with the possible safety issues I would agree with the other answer or comment that this should be looked at by someone knowledgeable ASAP.


3

Journal bearings have a small hole to constantly supply oil for lubrication. They do not rely on oil coming from the surrounding vicinity. That said, it is possible to run the bearing dry if there is insufficient oil pressure or the tolerance between the camshaft and bearing is too little, but the former scenario is an indication of bigger problems while ...


3

The noise you describe is a VERY common issue with the transmission in the model of RX-7 you are driving. As a matter of fact, my current RX-7 (1991, 220k miles) has this exact same issue. Based on your description, the noise is almost certainly coming from the transmission's input shaft bearing - not any part of the clutch assembly, or anything that would ...


3

Several suppliers sell a hub and bearing assembly. While more expensive it makes replacement a one trip job. There is no need to bring the assembly to a shop to have the hub removed and installed from the bearing. It does appear that once the rotor is removed you have access to the four bolts that retain the bearing to the knuckle. It will also require the ...


3

It is definitely not the same between a 4x4 and a 4x2 vehicle. The major difference between the two is that in a 4x4 application, there is the drive shaft which runs through the middle of the hub. You have to remove this in order to get to the bearing. 4wd is much more involved than a 2wd. Not knowing which year of vehicle you have, I cannot tell you exactly ...


3

Unfortunately there is no way to fix what ails your Ford here. You'll need to replace the spindle, hub, and I believe rotor as well (it appears the hub and rotor are one piece - is this correct?). There is no way to salvage this with out taking it to a machine shop, unless you have some mad machining skills (which I assume you don't, or you'd know the answer ...


3

The parking brake may not be releasing on that wheel. The parking brake cable may be damaged or rusted. Its also possible that the hydraulic cylinder in the brake caliper is stuck. Another possibility is the caliper pins which allow the caliper to stay centered over the rotor are corroded. You should inspect the parking brake cabling to ensure smooth ...


2

Noise from the strain of the power steering pump can cavitate (or 'reverberate' is probably more accurate) through lines and even to the steering wheel itself. Check fluid levels, and pump condition. If it all checks out it may just be normal. Typically bearings will not seize when they are already in motion. They can fail catastrophically, but it is ...


2

After a while, steering bearings can become filled with grit and grime, causing steering to feel not so smooth. Here are the steps to cleaning and greasing your steering bearings so that steering feels smooth and fluid again. Disassembly - In order to keep up with bolts, hand tighten bolts back in their respective receptor holes after removing components. ...


2

It depends on the size of the spindle and whether it is a straight spindle or not (more than likely it is straight). There are two common sizes for small trailers (I believe). It should be the A14 bearing set for the 1" spindle, or A6 set for the 1 1/4" spindle. If in the US, you should be able to pick these up from any of the major parts stores (AutoZone, ...


2

You lube the bearings until all the old grease is out. Can't really tell if 14oz is enough, but if using one of those fancy repackers, it might be. If replacing all together, just make sure there is enough grease in them. Some come pre-greased, but I would repack anyways. Can never really tell how long they been sitting in a parts room.


2

There are many very technical diagnostic methods involving chassis mics etc ... All the years I worked as a mechanic I just took the car to an open lot and made tight circles to the left and right to put a load onto one side at a time, you should hear the difference while under load like this and be able to determine which ones need replacement.


2

Sounds like the throwout bearing if you're hearing it mainly when you're operating the clutch pedal. Some vehicles do have an inspection port on the gearboxes bell housing, however in a lot of cases, removal of the gearbox and/or bell housing is required.


2

Throw out bearings (TOB) usually make noise when only when you press the clutch pedal. The reason for this is, it is the only time it is engaged and actually can make a noise. If you are hearing this particular noise at 2000-3000 rpm when you aren't actuating the clutch, this can be ruled out almost immediately. Input shaft bearing will make noise most of ...


1

I would not recommend packing either the cap or the space between the bearings. The external cap is only a dust cap and is not meant to hold back grease, just keep the dust out. The story is very similar with the inside seal. The seal is just to keep the dust out. If too much grease is put in, it may get displace and get passed the seals making a mess all ...


1

i went through that a lot every time bad bearing instillation either not aligned right or pressed in too tight. advice change your mechanic



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