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5

Another way is to jack up (and support) the car, then attempt to shake the wheel. Hold it at top and bottom and try and shake it vertically, then repeat horizontally. There should be very little, if any, play in it. As Dude318is says, a grainy feeling when rotating is another way to tell.


5

Easy way to check is remove each wheel, and rotate the disc. If you can remove the disc as well to get closer to the hub that would be even better. If the bearing rotates but not smoothly (i.e. having a sandy/grainy feeling) then that is likely the culprit. This is how I was able to track down a worn rear wheel bearing on my car.


5

Rubber tubing is a cheap alternative to a stethoscope. You can buy a couple feet of it for a couple dollars at any hardware store, just be careful where you point it. Thank Click & Clack for that, it worked for me.


4

Use an auto repair stethescope or even a long socket extension as a substitute to listen to each pulley when you start the car. If it's truly a bearing issue you'll hear it right away when you find the affected part.


3

Unfortunately there is no way to fix what ails your Ford here. You'll need to replace the spindle, hub, and I believe rotor as well (it appears the hub and rotor are one piece - is this correct?). There is no way to salvage this with out taking it to a machine shop, unless you have some mad machining skills (which I assume you don't, or you'd know the answer ...


3

Several suppliers sell a hub and bearing assembly. While more expensive it makes replacement a one trip job. There is no need to bring the assembly to a shop to have the hub removed and installed from the bearing. It does appear that once the rotor is removed you have access to the four bolts that retain the bearing to the knuckle. It will also require the ...


3

It is definitely not the same between a 4x4 and a 4x2 vehicle. The major difference between the two is that in a 4x4 application, there is the drive shaft which runs through the middle of the hub. You have to remove this in order to get to the bearing. 4wd is much more involved than a 2wd. Not knowing which year of vehicle you have, I cannot tell you exactly ...


3

Since when a wheel bearing goes bad you can feel it more than you can hear it, and there usually isn't any deflection in the wheel itself until the bearing is pretty much shot, the way I usually check for the bad bearing is with an automotive stethoscope: What I do is this: Put the car up on jack stands Take the wheel off of the car (if you need to ...


3

The parking brake may not be releasing on that wheel. The parking brake cable may be damaged or rusted. Its also possible that the hydraulic cylinder in the brake caliper is stuck. Another possibility is the caliper pins which allow the caliper to stay centered over the rotor are corroded. You should inspect the parking brake cabling to ensure smooth ...


2

It depends on the size of the spindle and whether it is a straight spindle or not (more than likely it is straight). There are two common sizes for small trailers (I believe). It should be the A14 bearing set for the 1" spindle, or A6 set for the 1 1/4" spindle. If in the US, you should be able to pick these up from any of the major parts stores (AutoZone, ...


2

You lube the bearings until all the old grease is out. Can't really tell if 14oz is enough, but if using one of those fancy repackers, it might be. If replacing all together, just make sure there is enough grease in them. Some come pre-greased, but I would repack anyways. Can never really tell how long they been sitting in a parts room.


2

To identify a worn bearing, raise your car, run it, and put a scope etc. on the hub. The weight of the front end will produce different noise, with the car in the air. Jack it up, Use a screwdriver, and have a friend spin the wheel, while you listen on the hub. If its bad you'll hear it.


2

Noise from the strain of the power steering pump can cavitate (or 'reverberate' is probably more accurate) through lines and even to the steering wheel itself. Check fluid levels, and pump condition. If it all checks out it may just be normal. Typically bearings will not seize when they are already in motion. They can fail catastrophically, but it is ...


2

If the noise is only happening when the clutch is engaged (pedal out), it's not the throw out bearing. You'd only hear the noise when you push on the pedal. This is because the only time the throw out bearing is being used is when you are pushing the pedal down. It won't contact the clutch fingers any other time, and therefor cannot make noise with the ...


1

It turned out that my lug nuts came loose and the wheel wobbling back and forth sounded like a bad wheel bearing. I know I tightened everything up when I was done. It's possible that the wheel or the rotor wasn't seeded correctly though and loosened up once I started driving. It should have been the first thing that I checked.


1

You should not need any more grease than what it takes to pack the bearing itself. Packing the entire wheel hub assembly is not only a waste, it's also not wise. When you go to change bearings or repack them in the future, you'll need to clean all of that old grease out. This is not a good idea. As an aside, I pack new bearings which may or may not have been ...


1

If you're greasing bearings, the rule of thumb you can fall back on is to apply as much grease as you would apply frosting on a cupcake (don't be silly, you know exactly what I mean). Excess grease will be expelled while you're tightening the retainer nut anyway.


1

After a while, steering bearings can become filled with grit and grime, causing steering to feel not so smooth. Here are the steps to cleaning and greasing your steering bearings so that steering feels smooth and fluid again. Disassembly - In order to keep up with bolts, hand tighten bolts back in their respective receptor holes after removing components. ...


1

If it only happens at certain speeds, you may also have a problem with a worn wheel bearing. They tend to whine like a fishwife at certain speeds. But also have a look at your brakes. While a wheel bearing certainly is annoying, it doesn't hurt the ears.


1

Are you sure about the location of the sound? It might be a loose or worn power steering belt that is slipping when the power steering pump is put under load.



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