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1

I'm a little late to the game on this, but those fans are controlled by a radiator sensor and a fan timer unit. My first guess is that your radiator sensor (lower right side) is bad, but you would need to pull and test it.


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If no fuses are blown or it still doesn't work after changing them, there is likely permanent damage, take a look at this thread: http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=547692 As to liability they probably are liable, but proving that and then getting them to pay may be difficult.


2

Just because the battery shows > 12 volts, it does not reliably mean that the battery is not the issue. How old is the battery? If > 4 years, it's probably time to replace it. It sounds like your car is not putting out enough Cold Crank Amps (CCA). There are two things you should do to eliminate the battery being the issue: Put the battery on a load ...


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When you have your subs hooked up, have someone install a capacitor, a spare battery for your subs. Shouldn't be any extra cost. It just goes from the power to the amp.


1

The correct way to charge a battery is to apply a charging current of around 1.5-2 amps to a maximum electrolyte specific gravity, then to fully discharge the battery at a very low 1 or 2 amps, then to re-charge the battery at a low amperage again, then discharge at a very low amps again. This process should be repeated until the electrolyte specific gravity ...


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Battery manufacturers make batteries to international standards, one of which was selected by VW as the battery for your vehicle. The problem you describe is specific to your vehicle, so a battery manufacturer would not be able to solve the problem as you are suggesting without violating the standard or creating a problem for the owner of some other vehicle ...


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The Ford Focus EV has two high voltage battery packs, one is in the rear cargo area and the other is located underneath the vehicle. I don't know if that is considered floor integrated but it isn't too different from what Tesla is doing.


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In a word, no. Any of the cells might need water. All of them would need water (or electrolyte) if it were tipped over. Usually when one needs it they all need it, but no rhyme or reason to it.


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Batteries have what is called a surface charge, which is probably the reason yours tested 12.6V -- you should wait several hours at room temperature prior to testing the voltage of the battery to compare against the 12.6V/12.7V standard. The reason you had intermittent electrical issues might be related to the fact that battery was consuming a lot of power ...


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On older vehicles the alternator would give out a high rate until it became warm. This used to be known as its saturation point. The alternator output would then drop off to supply the demand put on it plus maybe a couple of amps. A later 'smart' alternator and its control system can carry out conductive tests while operating and will better re-charge the ...


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Only if Tesla leases them rights to use their patent on this. Tesla's patent was published on June 28, 2012, so I'm doubting there are any other vehicles with this same technology, at least using Tesla's patent. I did find a separate patent filing by Ferrari which covers the use of floor mounted batteries in their LeFerrari. I'm not sure how it truly ...


1

Electricity is always cheaper than petrol. Battery charges may be useful for seasonal equipment -- if you store certain equipment with lead-acid batteries during the winter without resorting to the native charging system of the equipment (lawn mower, for example), then doing trickle charging during the winter will help maintain the full charge capacity of ...


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While a normal battery should be around 13.1vdc fully charged, I wouldn't consider 12.5vdc too much to worry about. If you are having issues where the starter is dragging or just plain not getting the car started, then I'd worry about it. I doubt your battery is sulfated. If it is having problems starting your vehicle, then get a new battery, not a new ...


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With the engine running, measure the voltage across the battery. If the voltage exceeds 14.5V then you have an alternator regulator fault. The regulator may be available on its own, but because of age you may have too have some kind of alternator rebuild. An outside chance is that an alternator from a later or differant vehicle may have the same fitting ...



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