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There was a > 30 fuse blown. Replaced that and tightened battery connectors. Also fuse under the steering wheel was blown. Fixed that, and I had headlights. Battery seems to be charging now. Check your fuses, I checked them and missed some blown ones.


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You don't need to worry about the desulfation circuit, although there are mixed reviews about how effective they are. However, AGMs are more sensitive to overcharging than a standard SLA (sealed lead-acid) batteries. Actually, it's not the main charging cycle that is harmful, but the float-charge cycle that is used to top them off. If you are getting a ...


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Take the battery somewhere it can be tested. It probably is only holding what is called a "surface charge". One cell may be bad in which will not charge correctly. When left to sit, even a small drain can cause it to lose its charge. I will bet the battery is the root cause if your issue, especially since you say the alternator is putting out good juice.


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I'd point you towards my previous answer to Adding a additional battery to car - You'll need to use deep-discharge leisure batteries rather than normal car batteries, and have them on a split-charge system so you don't drain the main battery while you're parked up. All the stuff you'll need will be available off-the-shelf from a decent 4x4/RV/Marine ...


1

If the battery symbol lights up that usually means "Check Alternator". You can confirm this by consulting your vehicle's owner's manual. It is possible for bad alternators to produce too much current. In such situations, most modern cars protect the battery with an overcharge-protection system that stops the current supply from the alternator. This kind of ...


4

I would think the alternator is the culprit, You can take your car down to an Advance Auto Parts, O'Reilly, Autozone (or the like) where they will test it for free. They can also check your battery, which may be the culprit, but I doubt it. It sounds like the internal regulator is going out (or you might have lost one or more diodes) on the alternator. ...


1

I use an ArkPak (made in Australia) that will house any battery up to 130amp/hrs. Can be charged in car/or via 240v adaptor or solar panels. Can be hard wired into car. Has inbuilt 150w inverter/pos. and neg. terminals/2x cigarette plugs type 12v ports/pure sine wave so you can run laptop/charge phone or camera. Decided advantage is that if not hard wired ...


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The battery is ready to use after you've put the acid in, and you can charge it on the bike, however, better practice would be to attach it to a charger to complete the first charge... Personally, I filled my battery with acid, and attached it to the battery charger WITHOUT putting the caps on the battery in order to allow the gas to escape. When completed, ...


0

I use a regulated solar panel connected to battery via alligator clips (battery cables disconnected) rather than cig. lighter plug where wiring could be suspect.Advantage is you can lock car in garage and affix panel outside.No theft concerns or fading paint


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Hi in my opinion you will be fine to use the battery with 80% charge, your bike will do the rest when you are out for a ride. Also it is a good idea to invest in one of the new SMART CHARGERS that are now on the market, these automatically top up the battery charge and are ideal for protecting your battery over the dormant winter period, when the battery is ...


2

While it is normally not required with a maintenance free battery yours may be a low maintenance type. Allowing the battery acid level to drop too low can cause the battery to overheat shortening its life. The small circles with the cross pattern on the top are caps. They can be removed and water can be added. It is best to use distilled water. If you don't ...


3

This battery type does not allow for easy checking and does not require it. If you had a battery with caps you could remove, then yes, you would use distilled water to top them off.


4

The reason behind tending it to bring it to 100% vs. just riding it up to 100% is to save wear and tear on the alternator or generator. They're really designed to maintain a battery/do light charging, not do a major charge. A secondary thing is that a severely discharged battery may vent a lot of hydrogen while charging and you'll need to monitor the cell ...


4

Those are definitely devices for holding hair in place. As for what purpose (if any) they were serving in your motorcycle, one can only guess!


3

My first thought is that they are a spacer or shim to prevent the battery from sliding back and forth in the battery box.



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