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1

According to this (rather old) article, Exide uses the following code: Forget the first two letters The next three are the letter month (C=March) and day (28) of the month Omit the letter K The last number is the year it was made (5=2005 ... more than likely, depending on the age of the batter - If it looks older, it could be 1995, but that would be way ...


1

5000btu a/c with a Honda eu2000i generator. Generator will run 8 to 9 hrs off 1gallon of gas. I work in the oilfield and sit in my truck all day. This is what I use. You can also run a phone charger and small radio with it.


2

It could also be the Crank Position Sensor. It is mounted on the flywheel cover and if it gets contaminated with dust from the clutch it can stop the engine from starting. It confuses the average guy as it looks like either a fuel or ignition problem. It is held in position with two bolts. Might be awkward to get to. Hope this helps.


0

Leaving your radio on so that you can hear it working with no key in the ignition is only possible on some cars. It's useful to be able to do this sometimes, but there is indeed a risk you will accidentally leave it on for a long period and eventually flatten the battery so you can't start it. With a healthy battery that would take weeks, but with an old ...


0

It depends. Some (most?) cars shut off the accessories automatically in "start" mode, however you still have a brief drain even then as you flip past "on" to "start". Does it matter? Most of the time no, it doesn't. It would only matter if your battery was already right on the edge. Reasons your battery might be borderline include old age and extreme ...


1

First thing you do is check the battery with a multi-meter (as mkaatman said). If the battery is good, it will have a reading well over 12.5vdc. If it is below this, put it on a charger and get it to 100%, which while sitting should be around 13.1vdc or more. I suspect the power level of the battery is going to be much lower than this and believe your ...


10

This step is a carryover from days gone by and is not needed in modern vehicles. Batteries from 50 or 60+ years ago were not as powerful or reliable as modern ones. Older batteries had difficulty handling the load of the starter motor alone. Engines cranked longer before starting and were cranking large displacement engines. Any added load from wiper, radio ...


0

In addition to the other suggestions about battery voltage and ignition switch, check that the exciter cable (typically the "thin" one) that goes to the starter motor has no breaks in it and is firmly connected. Check for obvious things like there are no blown fuses in the fuse box. One other suggestion is to check that you've not trapped any wiring under ...


4

It very much depends on how your radio is wired up. A typical car radio takes two feeds from the battery; switched live and memory live. Switched live is usually attached to the ignition switch and powers the radio up when the ignition is switched on. Memory live always takes a feed of power from the battery and is used to store things like the current ...


2

You should only use distilled water in to top off you battery. Anything else will contaminate the battery and cause it to fail prematurely. See here for more information


1

Put a multimeter on the battery or take it to an auto parts store and have it tested. If it's dead, charge it. If it's not dead, start tracing the power. A wire could have burnt up at a switch or perhaps there is a fuse that has died.


4

So a few things you can do: Ensure the tank is completely topped off. If carbureted (I believe your's is), turn off the pet cock, start the engine, and run it out of fuel. This will ensure your carburetor is nearly (if not completely) dry, which will allow it not to build up varnish from sitting fuel. Put fuel stabilizer in your fuel. I use Sta-Bil in your ...


2

Anything is possible, but small bumps and such shouldn't cause electrical problem like that. All we know now is that your battery is dead or disconnected. Pop the hood, and check to see the battery is still connected (i.e. the connections didn't come loose during a bump) Then you'll want to test it with a multimeter (if you have one), or just put the ...



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