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6

I don't know the actual justification, but to me it makes sense to always attach positive first because it is easy to accidentally touch the lead to something else while installing. If the negative lead were already attached, then touching the positive lead to just about anything on the car that is metal would short out the battery.


3

We talked about charging a lead-acid car battery inside an apartment a while back: What precautions are needed when charging a car battery in an apartment? My answer to that question described the reasons why I thought that was a terrible idea. In your case, you've put sealed NiCd batteries inside a moderately airtight box. While the NiCd batteries are ...


1

Frozen batteries can pose a significant hazard. As @Paul has stated the freezing point varies with the state of charge and battery type. A frozen battery can explode with considerable force spraying acid and shrapnel quite a distance. The explosion is caused by the expansion of the gas from charging. The gas is trapped by the ice and unable to vent. The ...


2

Conventional lead acid batteries produce hydrogen gas as a byproduct of the charging process. This gas tends to collect in and around the battery. As you are aware making the final connection can generate a substantial spark. By making the frame connection the point where the spark occurs it is far enough from the hydrogen gas to avoid an explosion.


0

The problem turned out to be the alternator.


2

First of all, eliminate everything else of the final things you pulled prior to assuming it's the solenoid on the starter, but I think you are onto it with the starter. You would have all of these symptoms with a starter motor which is engaged all the time. I'd suggest you are going to end up replacing the starter anyway ... the drive to the mechanic if only ...


4

It says right on the webpage: Conventional all-wheel drive cars employ complex mechanical linkages to distribute power from a single engine to all four wheels. This sacrifices efficiency in favor of all weather traction. In contrast, each Model S motor is lighter, smaller and more efficient than its rear wheel drive counterpart, providing both improved ...


1

If your car's battery has been removed a few times there is a chance that the terminals and/or wires have become loose or damaged. Loose connections could reduce the voltage that is getting to your starter. With a lower voltage getting to the starter motor there may not be enough power to start the car. You may want to go through each connection point ...


0

Paul explained the safety reasons, but not the usage issue. Deep draining a regular battery will kill it, as would over charging or over volting. The smaller batteries in your boosters too. So will letting them sit for too long, batteries do have a shelf life. Leaving the black ground cable connected will not do anything bad. Leaving it fully connected ...


4

The story is a bit rambling, but it sounds like your son's car has a serious electrical problem. 3 batteries behaving well for a long time, and all having problems at once is not a coincidence. Take one of your batteries to a garage (or, better, a battery shop) and have them charge and test it. It is possible to damage a car battery by overloading or ...


2

When the starter motor clicks but doesn't start the engine, that means it is not receiving enough power. If you get no click at all, then it's receiving almost no power at all. There are three possible causes: your battery is flat. your battery is no good. there is a bad connection somewhere between the battery and the starter motor. Or, alternatively, ...


1

I'm sure the people reading this just want a very simple answer and as I've always been told, the answer is 2000 RPM's. If your car was dead and you just received a boost the most acceptable answer for most vehicles is 2000 RPM. While you're driving and come to a red light, put the car in neutral and keep it around 1500 RPM. If you drive for at least 30 mins ...


0

I'll pipe in and suggest that the issue may be your alternator. Your battery is typically used to start the car, after which the alternator kicks in to provide your car's electrical needs and re-charge your battery. When the alternator goes bad, you drain your battery as you drive (lighting spark plugs, playing radio, etc). Then, when you go to start your ...


2

It sounds like the starter motor isn't getting enough power, and you've just had work done on it. Check all the wires between the battery and the starter motor for a loose connection. Or as Paulster2 said you might just need to buy a new battery.


2

If you have the ability to do so, I would get the battery checked. This seems to me to be the likely cause of your issue. A parts store should be able to check it for you. It sounds as though there is what is called a "surface charge". This condition usually stems from having a weak cell or two in the battery.


2

It sounds as though it is one or two things going on here. First of all, did you check the serpentine belt which drives the alternator? Is it still on there and looking ready to do its thing? If that is still there, it could very well be the alternator itself. I've had alternators which have completely froze up. From your description, this could very well ...



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