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You've done SOME damage, but probably not a great deal of damage. You've shortened your battery life somewhat by contributing to its sulfation. Some irreversible sulfation is inevitable in lead-acid batteries. Some is reversible, some is not. The deeper a (lead-acid) battery is discharged, the greater the amount of irreversible sulfation. Part of the ...


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Generally batteries that are damaged from excessive discharge will be protected by a discharge monitoring circuit that prevents discharge beyond a certain point, however these circuits themselves draw a small amount of power, which means that even with such a circuit, a battery could be damaged if left undercharged for an extended period of time (weeks, not ...


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Leaving the headlamps on for a couple of hours will not do any signicant damage to a car battery. Re-charging the battery overnight would normally put it back to fully charged. 'Smart' alternators used on todays vehicle will also charge your battery. When discharging, the plates of the battery become sulphated. Charging the battery removes this sulphation. ...


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It depends on how deeply-discharged the battery was. If the battery is high enough capacity two hours may not harm it. Starter batteries (used to start automobiles) are designed differently from deep-discharge (or "marine") batteries. (For traditional flooded acid batteries) starter batteries are designed to provide lots of current to turn an engine, and ...


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If you got a low point discharge, your battery is damaged. Some chemical processes can not be reconverted from that point. If you drive around for some time, your battery will get warm and have a little bit more charge then cold. That could be enough to start the car once again. You don't loose anything if you try to charge you battery. Maybe you are lucky. ...


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Check your battery across its posts, do not use any wiring or its clamp. Post to post with a voltmeter will tell you if you have power in the battery. Then with the red lead connected to the positive post, check for voltage on the vehicles negative cable clamp at the battery. Red lead connected still, check for voltage at the negative cable earthing end, and ...


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20 minutes is not enough to load your battery. If you could start your car after you driven a bit, your alternator is ok. You could try to load you battery, but it could be, that it reached a low point discharge. If so, only new one will help. Also if the battery is more then 5 years old, just change it. Old batteries lose more and more power at the time.


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It could simply be the battery needs a complete charge, or it could be the battery or a parasitic draw. You need to have the battery tested to start. You can see my post here on how to test a battery, or most auto parts stores will do it for you.


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If you have started the engine and you are getting 13-14.5V, the alternator is working and your problem would be most likely battery. Your local auto-parts store will usually have a heavy discharge battery tester to prove or disprove the servicibility of the battery before laying out money to replace it. In passing you should not assume the cables are OK but ...


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P1404 is the error code for the EGR valve (exhaust gas recirculation). From the symptoms you describe, however, I'd suspect you have a short circuit somewhere - you need to locate this before you can fix it - the best way of doing this is with a multimeter and a wiring diagram for the car (which you should find in a workshop manual). Charge the battery and ...



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