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6

Most modern diesel engines (ie: engines after mid-80s) require some electricity to run because they are electronically controlled. This is due to computers controlling the fuel charge and monitoring of the engine itself. Without this, the diesel engine has no control. They also require electricity to power the primary fuel pump, to move the fuel from the ...


6

You should not notice any difference. Here's why: 1 hp = 746 W. This means that 60 W is 0.08 hp. The worst possible scenario from a load perspective is at idle. Assuming the engine is outputting a measly 5 hp at idle, the extra load would work out to 1.6 % of this value. The change in fuel consumption is barely sensible.


6

With the description you give, I'd say you connected them backwards with about a 99%+ assurance. Large amounts of sparks followed by heat are both VERY BAD SIGNS (as you soon figured out) and almost always mean you have the jumpers on backwards. Never trust what the covers on the battery says. Check what the battery says to be sure. If there is no way to see ...


6

I don't know the actual justification, but to me it makes sense to always attach positive first because it is easy to accidentally touch the lead to something else while installing. If the negative lead were already attached, then touching the positive lead to just about anything on the car that is metal would short out the battery.


5

As Nick stated, try and get one of the same value. If one of the same value is not available, you can always go up in CCA/ah, but never go down. Vehicles are spec'ed with a certain battery because that is what it needs to operate the starter to get the engine going. With a lower CCA/ah, you run the risk of dragging the starter, which can cause it damage. The ...


5

I would think the alternator is the culprit, You can take your car down to an Advance Auto Parts, O'Reilly, Autozone (or the like) where they will test it for free. They can also check your battery, which may be the culprit, but I doubt it. It sounds like the internal regulator is going out (or you might have lost one or more diodes) on the alternator. ...


5

If you got a low point discharge, your battery is damaged. Some chemical processes can not be reconverted from that point. If you drive around for some time, your battery will get warm and have a little bit more charge then cold. That could be enough to start the car once again. You don't loose anything if you try to charge you battery. Maybe you are lucky. ...


5

No, you do not need to disconnect the battery from the vehicle before applying a battery tender. Ensure, however, that you disconnect the battery tender from the vehicle before you go to start it. If you don't, some tenders will self destruct.


4

The reason behind tending it to bring it to 100% vs. just riding it up to 100% is to save wear and tear on the alternator or generator. They're really designed to maintain a battery/do light charging, not do a major charge. A secondary thing is that a severely discharged battery may vent a lot of hydrogen while charging and you'll need to monitor the cell ...


4

Those are definitely devices for holding hair in place. As for what purpose (if any) they were serving in your motorcycle, one can only guess!


4

Modern vehicles have 'smart' alternators and your vehicle is MY2013 and should not be too troubled by your indicated use. For your peace of mind have you considered a solar panel plugged into your cigarette/power outlet socket? These are widely available from auto accessory shops and are quite inexpensive.


4

Depending on what you mean by "periodic", a 10 mile drive should be enough to recharge a battery if done, for instance, on a weekly basis. There is more to worry about than just the battery, though. Whenever you run your vehicle, you need to completely warm up the car (through driving). This allows for the conditioning of seals, allows gaskests not to dry ...


4

Yes for the most part an AGM is a drop in replacement for your standard Lead Acid Battery. The charging voltages are almost identical. You are correct that they have a lower internal resistance and can be charged at a much faster rate. This shouldn't cause a problem on the majority of vehicles as the wiring in the car is designed to handle the maximum rated ...


4

The cranking amps required to start an engine are not the same as the cranking amp rating of a battery. I don't know the amps required to start your car's engine, but if it is less than 400 amps, then it will work. Higher cranking amps in a battery yields additional benefits. The battery can be used for more starts because less capacity is used on each ...


4

The idea isn't to replace the amperage of the battery, but to boost (add to) what charge is available from your battery. The lower amperage output is fairly typical. For this reason and for the simple reason that these devices are made to be portable. If it had the same amperage as the battery in your car, it would weight about the same amount. Since your ...


4

The story is a bit rambling, but it sounds like your son's car has a serious electrical problem. 3 batteries behaving well for a long time, and all having problems at once is not a coincidence. Take one of your batteries to a garage (or, better, a battery shop) and have them charge and test it. It is possible to damage a car battery by overloading or ...


4

It says right on the webpage: Conventional all-wheel drive cars employ complex mechanical linkages to distribute power from a single engine to all four wheels. This sacrifices efficiency in favor of all weather traction. In contrast, each Model S motor is lighter, smaller and more efficient than its rear wheel drive counterpart, providing both improved ...


3

It should be 12 volt, and you should always charge at the lowest setting reasonable. In this case I would use the 2 amp setting, 6 amps won't hurt it necessarily but the faster you charge a battery the more you shorten it's life. Other than being smaller the isn't any difference in a car and motorcycle battery


3

It has been my experience that a battery has what I call a "rebound". After a large draw is put on it, such as the lights for a period of time, it loses some of it's peak power. Then when the draw is taken off and left to sit, it rebounds and regains some of its energy. This may have given you enough juice to get your car started. I don't have a scientific ...


3

You don't need to worry about the desulfation circuit, although there are mixed reviews about how effective they are. However, AGMs are more sensitive to overcharging than a standard SLA (sealed lead-acid) batteries. Actually, it's not the main charging cycle that is harmful, but the float-charge cycle that is used to top them off. If you are getting a ...


3

This battery type does not allow for easy checking and does not require it. If you had a battery with caps you could remove, then yes, you would use distilled water to top them off.


3

This is absolutely the right way to go! I'm not sure about the model, I'm just talking about a battery tender in general. A lot of people who own performance vehicles or recreational vehicles (RV's) here in the States will put one on their vehicle over the winter if it is a summer only driver. The tender will do exactly what you want. It keeps the battery ...


3

My first thought is that they are a spacer or shim to prevent the battery from sliding back and forth in the battery box.


3

It could simply be the battery needs a complete charge, or it could be the battery or a parasitic draw. You need to have the battery tested to start. You can see my post here on how to test a battery, or most auto parts stores will do it for you.


3

Yes, a reset could work, if the problem is that the ECU is used to the previous driver's driving style and his style was vastly different to your's. But it could also just be the way you drive. Do you drive more like Morgan Freeman or Vin Diesel? These cars are quite heavy on the juice in city driving. With mine, I get about 7.5l/100km on the highway going ...


3

Exide is simply a battery manufacturer. The Max, Matrix, and Express are just marketing names for some of their battery lines. The best battery to get is one that fits your car, and will last an appropriate length of time for the cost. If your battery is not being properly recharged, it's also possible that your alternator is bad, or is going bad. Both the ...


3

75 - 100 milliamp This is standard across most modern cars.


3

One way round your problem would be too have a second battery, together with diode pack and wiring to charge it independantly. If your intention is too camp out in remote areas, you really dont want to saddle the vehicles system with any loads. Alternatively a generator for your machine. A continuous 6amp load overnight is quite a high demand on a regular ...


3

There are three common causes for this: User error, as pointed by Regina Fault in the electrical wiring of the car Failing battery Since it took forever to charge it back up I believe the third issue applies. For the first, the solution is to pay attention when leaving the car: check lights, radio/music player, any consumers plugged into the ...


3

First try this: Park the car and disconnect the battery. Wait (and sleep). Next morning: Reconnect the battery. If it is dead then you got a problem with the battery. If not you have something which drains it overnight. Which leads to the next step: Finding out which part causes the drain. To do this either disconnect some of the fuses during the ...



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