Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Yes it can be easily done, but based on your scenario it's not necessary unless you want to sit for extended periods without running the engine. If you are going to leave the vehicle running for Air Conditioning for instance then you don't need to do anything it should work fine as equipped from the factory. Here are some things to consider If you still ...


9

The battery is bad. You need to get a replacement ... the one you bought may still be under warranty, though probably pro-rated at this point. More than likely, your current battery has a bad cell in it which doesn't accept the charge it is supposed to. Since batteries are built with multiple cells configured to work in series, one cell is all it takes to ...


6

I suppose it could damage the starter, but it's more likely that you're going to have issues with all the onboard electronics. Modern cars are full of mini computer systems that don't like improper voltage. With smoke coming out, something has certainly blown up, and the car needs a thorough going over by someone that's an automotive electrical expert.


6

Following on from Hillsons' answer, your best bet is to get a proper split-charge system with a leisure (aka traction) battery as the second battery. These are especially designed for powering equipment for long periods of time, with a different discharge pattern to suit prolonged low-level use, rather than a normal car battery which is designed for the ...


6

Most modern diesel engines (ie: engines after mid-80s) require some electricity to run because they are electronically controlled. This is due to computers controlling the fuel charge and monitoring of the engine itself. Without this, the diesel engine has no control. They also require electricity to power the primary fuel pump, to move the fuel from the ...


5

Yes, absolutely it can be done. Consider that this is common practice for boats and RVs. I myself added a second battery to my boat just to ensure I had enough juice for the stereo ( granted, if you kill the only boat battery you have, you can't just leave it parked in your driveway, you're stranded in a river or the ocean, a potentially dangerous situation ...


5

The Auxiliary Battery in your Prius is a VRLA battery, either Lead Calcium Battery, or AGM (Absorbed Glass Matt). I believe 2007 used the AGM. They are similar to a lead acid (Flooded Cell) but it doesn't have any liquid in it. They are more resistant to vibration and don't off gas when charging which makes them safe to be in the passenger compartment. ...


5

It will have to be fixed before you drive it very far. If the battery light is on the alternator is not charging, your not going to make it very far before the battery goes dead. Your local parts store will be able to test the alternator on the car, most if not all will do it for free. Based on the battery light I am confident it's the alternator, but ...


5

16 mA is very good, many manufactures say 50 - 75 mA is normal. You may have an intermittent parasitic draw. Something may be energizing at some point and drain the battery. One way to test this theory would be to disconnect the battery and let the car sit for 3 days. Hook the battery back up, if it cranks without a jump it's a parasitic draw, if it doesn't ...


4

Obviously the easy fix is replace the battery in your FOB then just hit unlock once you hook up the battery. But... If you are too lazy to replace your FOB battery. Try just putting the key in the ignition in the "ON" position then hooking up the battery. If that doesn't work then try cycling the key between off and on (not start) 5 times. If that doesn't ...


4

Definitely just insufficient current to run the starter motor. What happens (causing the flashing/clicking) is that when you turn the key, the starter relay/solenoid switches on, and the starter motor pulls all the available current, dropping the battery voltage extremely low. It can no longer power the relay, so the relay springs back and the load (starter ...


4

I'd like to preface my answer by saying that I think the OP has asked an interesting theoretical question that deserves a theoretical/hypothetical discussion. In no way should the following be taken as an indication that removing/installing batteries carries low risk of explosion. Take precautions when working around vehicle batteries. The risk of hydrogen ...


4

I wouldn't recommend it - Car betteries are designed for short bursts of high current (i.e. starting the engine), not prolonged discharge of that sort. If you want to use a car to power equipment, it is generally better to have a second 'leisure' battery fitted, with a split-charging system. Leisure batteries are designed for that kind of usage, and you ...


4

The battery is in the trunk next to the spare tire under the carpet. You will need a 10mm socket for the bolts on the terminals and a 13mm socket for the bolt on the strap that holds it in place. A socket extension or deep well sockets would be handy. Lift up the carpet. Remove the hydrogen vent tube from the left side of the battery. Undo the 10mm bolt ...


4

As batteries get older, they will gradually lose their ability to hold a charge over time - How old is the battery? The length of your journey sounds like enough to replace the charge used to start the car, assuming the alternator is working fine. Get a multimeter (aka volt/ohm/amp meter), and measure the voltage across the battery. It should be roughly ...


4

Sounds to me like you are not making connection to the battery (maybe this is what you mean by "dead short"?). I would look at your contact points ... both sides of the battery, ground, and starter to ensure you are making good contact. If you have side posts (assuming you do), these have a tendency of not making complete contact even when tightened. Make ...


4

So is there any point of spending money to buy special cleaner or using coke or baking soda when it should be possible just to clean it with plain water? If you have to clean your battery terminals right now, you have to use the tools available to you. You're going to want to be mindful of these facts: The corrosion deposits can be obnoxious to ...


4

The reason behind tending it to bring it to 100% vs. just riding it up to 100% is to save wear and tear on the alternator or generator. They're really designed to maintain a battery/do light charging, not do a major charge. A secondary thing is that a severely discharged battery may vent a lot of hydrogen while charging and you'll need to monitor the cell ...


4

I would think the alternator is the culprit, You can take your car down to an Advance Auto Parts, O'Reilly, Autozone (or the like) where they will test it for free. They can also check your battery, which may be the culprit, but I doubt it. It sounds like the internal regulator is going out (or you might have lost one or more diodes) on the alternator. ...


3

My Volvo has a similar setup in the engine compartment. It's battery is in the trunk. Try checking where the spare tire would be. EDIT I found some helpful advice on changing the Cobalt's battery at yourcobalt.com. So, as we all know the battery for the Cobalt is located in the truck of the car. Its about a 20 minute deal to replace the battery. ...


3

Batteries give off the most hydrogen while charging or discharging so an idle disconnected battery probably isn't in danger of exploding. If you are connecting a battery to a vehicle the risk is pretty low because the battery shouldn't be producing hydrogen. If you are connecting jumpers to another vehicle's battery there is a higher risk because there could ...


3

Check and test the battery as it's likely to be the problem. If it tests okay and is fully charged, the next likely culprit will be the starter motor solenoid. Assuming the battery is all good, remove the starter motor and have the brushes checked/replaced by a local business who do electrical repairs.


3

First I would find out if it is drive by wire (electronic throttle), or cable. Since it's a 2002 I'm going to guess cable. Also, if it were electronic throttle, there are many redundancies and checks in the system and the dash would have the MIL lit. Since that doesn't apply, I'm pretty confident it's a cable throttle. So, check under the hood for a loose ...


3

I managed to pull over and change to the spare wheel in about 30 minutes (having never changed a tire before! Lesson learned!) Well done. It's not the world's most challenging job but you can hurt yourself if you're stressed (say after a blowout). Whilst driving after the jump start and while the battery was still very low on power, I noticed ...


3

A less than optimal battery and a functioning solenoid you would at least get the bendix to actuate. The less than optimal battery, would not supply enough power to have the starter actually rotate the engine. This is usually audiable with a quickly repeating clicking type noise and other times by one "click" [and usually the driver cussing and pounding on ...


3

Replace, the battery; your alternator and starter will both be subjected to higher stress if the battery is low. If you can't replace it immediately put a trickle charger on it when the vehicle is not in use. (The rare-use scenario you outlined would justify a trickle charger whether the battery is dying or not. But not all vehicles can be garaged, so ...


3

It sounds like your Passive Anti-Theft System (PATS) security system has locked you out, but I bet you figured that out already ;-) I found some instructions for resetting a Mercury Mountaineer, and would imagine it should work for your Montego as well. A symptom you should also be looking for is whether the flashing red light continues to blink at double ...


3

Any ground (earth) location will work. On my '06 Silverado, there are places to hook the jumpers which are away from the battery. You don't even hook the jumpers to the battery no matter which way you're going (whether jumping or being jumped). As long as you have a good ground location, you're golden. Given two vehicles with alternative connection points ...


3

This is absolutely the right way to go! I'm not sure about the model, I'm just talking about a battery tender in general. A lot of people who own performance vehicles or recreational vehicles (RV's) here in the States will put one on their vehicle over the winter if it is a summer only driver. The tender will do exactly what you want. It keeps the battery ...


2

To answer the actual question of "how to remove these fastener/screw things": Use a flat head screwdriver to pop out the inner, smaller circle thing. Once that is done, you can use your fingers to pick up the outer circle thing. Then grab hold of the entire air intake box and wiggle it free of the rubber sleeve/seal and the entire thing will come of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible