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10

This step is a carryover from days gone by and is not needed in modern vehicles. Batteries from 50 or 60+ years ago were not as powerful or reliable as modern ones. Older batteries had difficulty handling the load of the starter motor alone. Engines cranked longer before starting and were cranking large displacement engines. Any added load from wiper, radio ...


9

The starter circuit should only draw whatever current it needs so the excess shouldn't cause any problem.


6

With the description you give, I'd say you connected them backwards with about a 99%+ assurance. Large amounts of sparks followed by heat are both VERY BAD SIGNS (as you soon figured out) and almost always mean you have the jumpers on backwards. Never trust what the covers on the battery says. Check what the battery says to be sure. If there is no way to see ...


6

I don't know the actual justification, but to me it makes sense to always attach positive first because it is easy to accidentally touch the lead to something else while installing. If the negative lead were already attached, then touching the positive lead to just about anything on the car that is metal would short out the battery.


6

The amp count tells you the maximum amount of current that the equipment can supply. Eg. Your car needs 600 amps to start: The 1000 amp jumper can handle it. Your car needs 1200 amps: The 1000 amp jumper can't do it. You'll have to find a bigger one. Be aware that this does not apply to voltage. If you have a 6V battery and you connect it to a 12V ...


5

If you got a low point discharge, your battery is damaged. Some chemical processes can not be reconverted from that point. If you drive around for some time, your battery will get warm and have a little bit more charge then cold. That could be enough to start the car once again. You don't loose anything if you try to charge you battery. Maybe you are lucky. ...


5

No, you do not need to disconnect the battery from the vehicle before applying a battery tender. Ensure, however, that you disconnect the battery tender from the vehicle before you go to start it. If you don't, some tenders will self destruct.


5

The cranking amps required to start an engine are not the same as the cranking amp rating of a battery. I don't know the amps required to start your car's engine, but if it is less than 400 amps, then it will work. Higher cranking amps in a battery yields additional benefits. The battery can be used for more starts because less capacity is used on each ...


4

Modern vehicles have 'smart' alternators and your vehicle is MY2013 and should not be too troubled by your indicated use. For your peace of mind have you considered a solar panel plugged into your cigarette/power outlet socket? These are widely available from auto accessory shops and are quite inexpensive.


4

Depending on what you mean by "periodic", a 10 mile drive should be enough to recharge a battery if done, for instance, on a weekly basis. There is more to worry about than just the battery, though. Whenever you run your vehicle, you need to completely warm up the car (through driving). This allows for the conditioning of seals, allows gaskests not to dry ...


4

Yes for the most part an AGM is a drop in replacement for your standard Lead Acid Battery. The charging voltages are almost identical. You are correct that they have a lower internal resistance and can be charged at a much faster rate. This shouldn't cause a problem on the majority of vehicles as the wiring in the car is designed to handle the maximum rated ...


4

The idea isn't to replace the amperage of the battery, but to boost (add to) what charge is available from your battery. The lower amperage output is fairly typical. For this reason and for the simple reason that these devices are made to be portable. If it had the same amperage as the battery in your car, it would weight about the same amount. Since your ...


4

Corrosion on the terminals is due to hydrogen gas being released from the acid in the battery. It mixes with other things in the atmosphere under the hood and produces the corrosion you see on the terminals. Generally, if the corrosion is occurring on the negative terminal, your system is probably undercharging. If on the positive side, it is probably ...


4

The story is a bit rambling, but it sounds like your son's car has a serious electrical problem. 3 batteries behaving well for a long time, and all having problems at once is not a coincidence. Take one of your batteries to a garage (or, better, a battery shop) and have them charge and test it. It is possible to damage a car battery by overloading or ...


4

It says right on the webpage: Conventional all-wheel drive cars employ complex mechanical linkages to distribute power from a single engine to all four wheels. This sacrifices efficiency in favor of all weather traction. In contrast, each Model S motor is lighter, smaller and more efficient than its rear wheel drive counterpart, providing both improved ...


4

If your starter motor is working 8 times out of 10 then you probably need to replace it. It very likely has developed a dead spot on the armature. If the armature is positioned so that the brushes land on a dead spot, it won't start. Brushes are the electrical connection between the power source and the moving armature. The picture below shows how these ...


4

There are two things I'd look at as the problem. First and most likely is the solenoid on the starter is almost shot. The solenoid has a large copper washer which is pressed into the two posts (one from the battery connection and the other going to the starter motor). When this wears out, you'll get a clicking sound (almost a dead thud) as the Bendix is ...


4

The question really is what the voltage was just before the jump start. A jump start is nothing more than get the engine running from another battery. If the engine runs again, the alternator/dynamo will charge the partly depleted battery again. Nobody can tell how long you need to drive to get the battery fully loaded again, as this depends on the state of ...


4

Almost any amount of load you put on the battery is going to drop the voltage. How much depends on the capacity of the battery as well as the health. It would appear that 12.32V would put the battery into the 60% charge according to most of the State of Charge charts. State of charge charts are referring to open circuit voltage (without any load on the ...


4

How old is the battery (if it has a date stamped on it)? If it is over five years old, I'd replace it as a maintenance item. Remember too, a healthy battery should actually be over 13vdc at rest and fully charged. If your battery was only reading 12vdc, this is an indication of a weak battery to me. It may have a bad cell and accumulate what I call a surface ...


4

So a few things you can do: Ensure the tank is completely topped off. If carbureted (I believe your's is), turn off the pet cock, start the engine, and run it out of fuel. This will ensure your carburetor is nearly (if not completely) dry, which will allow it not to build up varnish from sitting fuel. Put fuel stabilizer in your fuel. I use Sta-Bil in your ...


4

It very much depends on how your radio is wired up. A typical car radio takes two feeds from the battery; switched live and memory live. Switched live is usually attached to the ignition switch and powers the radio up when the ignition is switched on. Memory live always takes a feed of power from the battery and is used to store things like the current ...


3

One way round your problem would be too have a second battery, together with diode pack and wiring to charge it independantly. If your intention is too camp out in remote areas, you really dont want to saddle the vehicles system with any loads. Alternatively a generator for your machine. A continuous 6amp load overnight is quite a high demand on a regular ...


3

Exide is simply a battery manufacturer. The Max, Matrix, and Express are just marketing names for some of their battery lines. The best battery to get is one that fits your car, and will last an appropriate length of time for the cost. If your battery is not being properly recharged, it's also possible that your alternator is bad, or is going bad. Both the ...


3

75 - 100 milliamp This is standard across most modern cars.


3

Yes, a reset could work, if the problem is that the ECU is used to the previous driver's driving style and his style was vastly different to your's. But it could also just be the way you drive. Do you drive more like Morgan Freeman or Vin Diesel? These cars are quite heavy on the juice in city driving. With mine, I get about 7.5l/100km on the highway going ...


3

There are three common causes for this: User error, as pointed by Regina Fault in the electrical wiring of the car Failing battery Since it took forever to charge it back up I believe the third issue applies. For the first, the solution is to pay attention when leaving the car: check lights, radio/music player, any consumers plugged into the ...


3

First try this: Park the car and disconnect the battery. Wait (and sleep). Next morning: Reconnect the battery. If it is dead then you got a problem with the battery. If not you have something which drains it overnight. Which leads to the next step: Finding out which part causes the drain. To do this either disconnect some of the fuses during the ...


3

Depends on make and model. Some cars come with cigarette/accessory power outlets that are keyed, some come with outlets that are always on, and some have both. Keyed outlets switch on and off with the ignition switch position. That switch powers a relay that turns on power for most accessories. An always on outlet is a straight (fused) connection to the ...



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