Hot answers tagged

7

Repeated clicking is a result of not enough power making it to the starter. Your battery either has a bad connection, or is too weak to turn the starter motor. Battery Connection Your problem may be entirely due to a bad connection. Starters draw a lot of amps, and batteries are weaker in cold temperatures. I'd start by fully exposing the terminals. You ...


7

The fastest, cheapest and easiest solution is to add a battery disconnect switch to the car. After placing the ignition switch into acc mode the open the hood and disconnect the switch. When you arrive at your destination, open the hood and reconnect the switch. This costs under $20. It also eliminates the need to run anything or calculate anything. Many ...


6

This could be caused by multiple things, the most likely case would be a bad battery in need of replacement. However before coming to that conclusion there are a few things which can be checked. Make sure your battery terminals are in good working order and are not grounding out any where make sure they are insulated and not cracked and touching metal. ...


6

Yes its possible to start a car with Ultra capacitors.These caps dont appear to have a cycle life like the traditional lead acid battery does .The ability of these caps to provide starting current is very good .There are a couple of snags :The caps at present are more pricey than the best lead acid batteries.The caps are strung in series to get the nominal ...


6

I recommend you carry out the following steps: Have the starter relay tested. From the description provided (old starter was clicking) this may actually be fine but it is so easy to verify that it works it would be silly to not rule this out as the source of the problem. After locating the starter relay, have someone turn the key in the ignition to start ...


5

The battery should simply be recharged. Draining a regular automotive battery is not good to do on a regular basis, but doing it once isn't going to have a noticeable ill effect. Giving the battery a full charge would help it, and it's more than most people would do. Most will just jump start the car, and hope for the best from alternator charging. That ...


5

There are a number of ways to go about purchasing a new battery for the vehicle. Easiest way would be to find the part number and see if any of the local parts stores have the same part number or can cross reference that number to the batteries they sell. For example an: LM40CP - Manufactured by Exide is equivalent to an NS40ZMF - Manufactured by ...


5

tl;dr: You are doing a better job than most, and as a result reducing your chemical footprint further will largely require being more proactive about safe chemical disposal than most people are willing to be. Having said that, there are a few things to consider. Reduce the amount of waste that you generate where possible. The best thing I can suggest for ...


5

If you have a volt meter that you can connect to the battery you will be able to check the alternator. Before starting the engine, check the battery voltage, it will probably be a little over 12v. Now start the engine and turn on your headlights to draw some power. If the alternator is working, the battery voltage should now be between 13.8 and 14.4 ...


5

You may have a bad stator As @paulster2 stated, you should have your battery tested. You could have a lead plate the broke free inside the batter and grounding out that cel to another cel. Your voltage test could be an indicator that it is not your battery though. Here is a method you can use to test your stator. Testing Your Stator There are three ...


4

They are right. Its not a problem yet. There are no signs that battery fluid is escaping through the post. Keep an eye on it, though. :)


4

A car battery's power will drop with temperature. It would be my first port of call. Since the car ran fine when you had it jumpstarted with the help of your friend, I would have the battery tested to make sure that it can deliver sufficient juice to the starter.


4

adding a diode would probably be counterproductive as it will cause an extra voltage drop, I'd look into fitting a relay such that the socket was not connected during engine start.


4

All batteries have a self discharge rate. This comes form the inherent nature of their chemistry. Lead acid batteries are one of the worst offenders when it comes to their self discharge rate. The estimates are all different but between 5% and 20% of capacity discharge a month is the general consensus. Because the discharge rate is a function of current ...


4

To answer the title question, no. I've worked in several automotive retail outlets and have never seen an automotive battery not precharged. They may exist, but it would be an odd sight to see. Automotive batteries are very frequently purchased and installed in the same transaction. The batteries in which you need to put in the electrolyte, you also need to ...


4

Since the drain is very repeatable, connecting an ammeter in series with the battery and disconnecting each fuse in turn is a good idea as @jphil1618 suggested. You could find that the problem is associated with multiple fuses, for example it could be the fuel pump that is running (I know you would hear the pump) and while pulling the fuel pump fuse will ...


3

Your Problem There are a few reasons that you might have your engine cut out. If you have any error codes (found by plugging in a scan tool to the OBDII port on your car), they would help dramatically in being able to narrow down the array of possible answers to your problem. If you do have a faulty connection, which I don't think you do, then a code ...


3

Disconnecting the battery messes up your radio, etc. Instead of a diode which causes a voltage drop you could put a 55 W lamp in series. It will limit the current to the battery but as the battery charges up the voltage drop across the bulb will reduce and the battery gets full alternator voltage. When cranking the motor home its battery voltage may drop to ...


3

Cars commonly multiplex their electrical systems. This means that multiple things are fed from the same fuse. The best way to identify what is on the fuse is to check the wiring diagrams. Once all the possible sources from the fuse have been identified the fault can be systematically narrowed down. First look at components that come on and off, this is the ...


3

1) From an electrical perspective, you always connect negative of charger to negative of battery. The closer the better (i.e. put the clips directly on the battery) to avoid losses and heating in the wiring of the car. To check for this put your voltmeter across the battery when you are charging, then put it across the output of the charger. Any difference ...


3

You have another issue The battery doesn't sound like to the core issue that you are experiencing. I propose that your stator or rectifier have gone bad thus you are experiencing a situation where you have to have your battery serviced. The motorcycle should be 'servicing your battery' and charging it as you ride the motorcycle. You will want to test ...


3

No, you can't. A car battery needs a lot of amps at ~12v, and most USB outlets are rated between .5A and 2A at 5v. Car batteries run in the hundreds of amps at 12v. Water hoses often make a good analogy for electricity. Think of amps as the width of the hose, and volts as the speed that the water is flowing at. Your smartphone powerbank is a hose the size ...


3

The car will be fine, that's just the noise the starter motor/solenoid makes when the battery is flat. The solenoid switches on the motor and engages the motor's gear with the flywheel, allowing it to turn the engine. There is a strong spring which pushes the solenoid back to its resting position after use. When the battery is very low it can't supply ...


3

A lot of times, I use a "water in a pipe" analogy when I think about electricity. In order to explain why the lights dim when you start the car, consider the following: your car, on average, uses a reasonable amount of electricity. This electricity can be considered equivalent to water flowing through a pipe, let's say a 2-inch pipe. When you turn your ...


3

On the starter there will be two connections. The smaller gauge wire (s terminal - blk/wht) will run from the starter to the neutral safety switch ( A/T only - right side of transmission) and then to the ignition switch. The larger gauge wire runs directly to the battery. On a M/T the wire runs straight to the ignition switch. The larger gauge wire will ...


3

That sounds like a loose connection at a specific wire. Car alternators have a control output to tell the instrument cluster or the ecu that the alternator is running and generating power. It there is voltage on that wire, the battery lamp is off and vice versa. In allmost all cars it's as simple as this. Most likely the wire on that terminal wasn't ...


2

As Paulster2 said, any bare metal should provide a good ground. Most common places to attach leads in your situation would be a lifting eye (if your engine has them), the body of the alternator is normally easy to attach to, or any metal part of the engine. Also make sure the metal you attach the lead to is capable of carrying enough current to start the ...


2

I took it to a main dealer and had the car diagnosed there. They replaced the battery and so far the car seems fine. I guess that battery test equipment can only test it to a certain degree - e.g. it can tell if a battery is definitely gone. In my case it was gone but undetectable by such equipment.


2

If your battery completely self-discharges in 4 weeks, you should consider changing it. A good battery stays in shape for at least a couple of months, even with the ground cable connected. If your battery is good, you should have your car checked. Drawing so much current as to empty the battery in 4 weeks is not normal, and may indicate a serious electrical ...


2

I took the care to the a mechanic and they said it was or could be two things: When the battery dies sometimes the internal computer\memory needs to be reset. The car's throttle body needed cleaning. So far it has not stalled after having both of these done (5 days now). Not sure which of the above actually of the above fixed the issue ... maybe both. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible