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12

You could do this, but you would not want to. By running current through the surface of the boat, you will induce a voltage potential across it. This voltage potential will cause current to flow from one part of the boat, through the water, to another part of the boat. This will cause electrolytic corrosion, which you definitely don't want.


9

It wouldn't be the fuse which is causing the power drain, but the circuit the fuse is there to protect. (This is the reason why the copied area you have posted has 5 "Not Helpful" votes against it.) The fuse is only a conduit. It transmits electricity. When the circuit transmits too much electricity, the fuse heats up, then "pops", not allowing anymore ...


7

The battery will loose charge even if it has no loads connected. This happens due to the nature of the chemistry of lead acid type batteries. A fully charged battery will fully discharge in a few months. The older it is the faster it happens. Significant damage happens to a battery that is discharged while a charged battery has much less damage. The ...


5

Unless you give the make and model of your battery, it's not possible to give you specifics. However, most of the info should be printed on the label, and you can also generally go to the battery manufacturer's web site and look at the actual specs. Most car batteries are "12V" (not really exact, and also depending on remaining charge and current draw) but ...


4

First the disclaimer: I don't know much about motorcycles – really all I know about motorcycles is inferred from cars and bicycles. But I do know a fair amount about electrical systems. That said… TL;DR – the headlight may have put your system out of balance by enough that your battery can't make up for the additional load and the alternator is always ...


4

You could do what you are suggesting, but to what end? It seems to me you'd have a much greater chance for something to go wrong. Here are a few things to think about: If you are running your trolling motor off of both, there is the distinct possibility you'll drain both batteries and then you'd be stranded. Keeping them independent will help ensure this ...


4

The batteries are manufactured in India. The company which produces them is called Mindtrac. The reason you don't know much about them is they received seed capital in 2000 from JPMorgan as a startup. They produce tires, batteries, and some other stuff. They are supposed to be ISO 14001 certified, so apparently they worry about the environment, which is a ...


4

Common things that can shut a car down after starting: bad or disconnected idle air control valve (hold the accelerator down after starting, see if it keeps the engine alive) bad or disconnected mass airflow sensor bad ignition switch blocked fuel filter (test your fuel pressure) weak fuel pump (test your fuel pressure with the engine off but the key at ...


4

Just like with a car. Remove the negative battery cable. Get your multimeter, set it to DCA (DC Amps). Use 10A mode if its available. Connect it between the negative post and the cable. Reading should be < 50ma. If its over this, start pulling fuses until you see what makes it drop. When you find what is causing the draw, find out why it is not ...


4

You mention, "no draining electrics," can you say more about how you determined this? It's important because "a self-draining battery" requires something that is causing a load on the battery – especially since you have a relatively new battery. On newer cars, there is a risk that disconnecting the battery may cause problems with your radio or other on-...


3

Any car jump starter device will do, such as http://www.walmart.com/ip/Schumacher-Instant-Power-500-Peak-Amp-Jump-Starter/13005748 Cheaper, simpler, and more reliable than playing with stuff you find around the house.


3

What can drain your battery is Alarm system, Radio (memory), Remote control key (radio signal receiver), ECU, Clock... Can't imagine anything else. Even if you have all of this, they shouldn't drain a battery in one week. Only thing you can do is to get a Ampere Meter and stick it in that faulty fuse to see what it drains. The fuse can not drain anything, ...


3

How long does it take to charge a battery? Ideally assuming 100% percent efficiency a 10 A battery charger would charge a 50 A/h (Ampere/hour) battery in about 5 hours. Hours of charge = Ampere-Hour rating/charge rate ....ideally In reality due the fact that when a battery is charging the charge rate is not constant. As a battery over time becomes ...


3

Firstly, please add more information: What is to make and model of you bike? What are the exact modifications you've done (with spec of the components)? Now, when you say "under full load" I assume that you mean with all optional electrical system on and at full settings (like with the high beam on). If that's what you mean, then your horn will function ...


3

Sounds like a dead alternator. I had that same issue years ago with an '89 VW fox. The reason that everything was slowly shutting down is because you driving on the battery alone. As the battery was getting drained the voltage was falling below the affected component operating threshold voltage and they would begin to cut out. The process would take about ...


3

The main thing your battery has to do it start the car, and act as a 'buffer' for the alternator. Starting the car is by far the highest load on the battery. Most car batteries are rated in Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) to determine how well they will turn the starter when it is cold out. The battery stores power, accessories draw power, the alternator feeds ...


2

So I think the easiest thing to do would be to get a 9 volt battery connector like this: and some alligator clips with wires: and just plug in the battery, connect the clips to the 9v connector wires and to the ends of the car's battery connectors then disconnect the the car battery and install the new one. You could probably get it all for a few ...


2

Sounds to me more an alternator problem: I ran with a problem like that precisely this year, and was the alternator brushes being dirty making a poor electrical contact inside the alternator. That will make the alternator not provide enough juice. My experience is that regulators "work or won't work". Also check the alternator belt. Under load or sudden ...


2

The list for why the car did not start is long. Instead lets hit some basics. First to successfully bump start a modern car the battery cannot be completely flat. (that is less than 8v or so but depends on car) This is because the alternator needs some electricity to excite it to generate power. The car may not have enough power to turn over the starter ...


2

A "standard" battery will deliver 12.6 volts when fully charged. When charging (e.g. when the engine is running and the alternator is charging the voltage will rise to around 14.2 volts (there is a normal range from around 13.5 to 14.5 volts – don't be to picky about the actual voltage while charging unless you have specific specs). Different batteries will ...


2

This test is rudimentary, but efficient. Testing the battery voltage with the car off tells you the current state of the battery (can it hold a charge) Testing the battery voltage with the car on tells you the state of the alternator (can it recharge the battery) Measuring the battery draw while you are starting the car tells you the current state of the ...


2

So, the real question here isn't "can my battery do it," but "can my alternator do it?" All of the normal running load of your car should be supplied by the alternator. The battery is there to start the engine and to provide for high short term loads (e.g., the horn or maybe lights at idle). You can think of the battery as storage for electrical power, it ...


1

First of all, I realize your goal is to charge the car battery, but note that the typical approach is to just start the car (you need to output a few hundred amps for a short amount of time to start a car). Secondly, assuming your alternator functions properly, you don't need to charge the car battery, you just need to get the engine started. The alternator ...


1

Three things: The currents involved will need thicker gauge cables or they will melt. For about the same cost of tinkering with all this stuff, buy yourself a battery charger. If you don't have an electrical socket near where you usually park, either get a proper extension cord or learn how to disconnect and remove a car battery, charge it in your home. ...


1

The "Depress clutch to start" gadget should be dealing only with a starter motor relay. Everything else should be working anyway, so if your "Bump-Start" was at low speed and 1st gear, then yea, it was a faulty "Bump-start". Normally it should be done at 2nd or even 3rd gear on diesel engines because of very high compression..


1

A dead battery or a weak/dead alternator are the usual suspects with these symptoms. Here's what you should do: Get yourself a $15 multimeter (WalMart has them). Set it to "VDC20" and put the leads on your battery terminals. A healthy battery will read 12.4V or higher, anything less than 11.8V will be insufficient to start the car. If you are reading less ...


1

One option might be to change alternators to one with a higher output, the battery really should only be there to handle starting and intermittent loads (like your horn). The bulk of the electrical load should be handled by the alternator. Another question I'd ask is how much are you loosing by running the headlight on DC (which I think you're converting ...


1

I would try using a multimeter that can measure DC current to see which circuits are drawing power with the ignition off. The radio should draw some, and the alarm (if your car has one) and whatever circuit handles the remote door locks, but other than that there shouldn't be anything drawing any power. Make sure there aren't any lights or anything that aren'...



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