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10

FWD cars dont have a rear axle, the wheels are mounted independently, there may be some situations where there is a tube there, but it will not have an axle shaft.


6

The only thing I see of any real concern here would be the left rear toe - it's off enough to possibly cause some tire wear. However, since it can't be adjusted, your best bet is to just rotate the tires regularly (every other oil change is a good rule of thumb) and keep an eye out for wear. You didn't say which Nissan you're driving, but I'm assuming it's ...


5

I would apply a light coating of white lithium grease. It is thin enough that it it won't be wiped off the shaft sliding through the bearings. It also is resistant to getting washed off by rain or routine washing. The light coating of grease should keep the shaft from seizing in the bearings.


5

The wheels just ride independently on bearings, they aren't connected by an axle like in a RWD vehicle. I think you misunderstand the true purpose of a differential. A ring and pinion is necessary to take the rotation of the driveshaft and change it's rotational axis. That is, the driveshaft is spinning about an axis from front to back of the vehicle and ...


5

First, I have to compliment your stamina. I doubt I'd be able to keep swinging a mallet for two whole weeks. Soak the area in a good penetrating oil. I like Wurth's Rost Off, but there are many choices. Hit it with penetrating oil once or twice a day for a while. Give it a few whacks with a mallet, if it doesn't loosen up, hit it with more penetrating oil, ...


3

There are three things to check. First, check your u-joints to ensure they are in good shape. To do this, chock your tires, put it in neutral, and try to move the drive shaft ends at the yokes. There shouldn't be any play there. Second, you need to check your pinion angle. Basically, if you drew a line directly back from, and in line with the transmission ...


3

I don't believe remanufactured has a legal definition in most states. It is important that you know the company that rebuilds the part. If possible check their web site or literature for specifics. Most of the large reputable rebuilders will state what they replace, what they inspect and what they reuse. You want to understand what they did so you can ...


3

I can't speak to specifics for your ATV, but the basic process for removing an axle is: Take off the nut holding the axle in the wheel hub. I do this with a large socket wrench/breaker bar. Remove the lower ball joint from the lower control arm (see the bottom middle of your second photo). This can be difficult, and lots of the methods people suggest will ...


3

I always use brake cleaner for all metal parts, some of which could be related to actual brakes. It's good for for anything from gears to axles, bearing races, rotors.


3

If It remember correctly, it is usually the inside wheel - i.e. if the noise is louder on sharp right turns, it's the right hand joint and vice versa. The best way to tell is to jack up the car and support it on stands. Grasp the wheel in one hand and the driveshaft in the other, and try to rotate them in opposite directions. The worn one should feel ...


2

I'd get someone to stand outside the vehicle while you test it in a parking lot and see if they can hear which side it's coming from. Or you could strap a recording device on each side and compare the loudness. If you can't find the problem after doing that, I'd just let it go for a while until it gets worse. This would be bad advice if you want to fix the ...


2

I am a bit confused by your question, but I am going to attempt to guess... If your actual axle moved back: Put a block in the front to keep tires from rolling, lift the rear of the truck, place on jack stands, and use the jack(Assuming its on wheels) to maneuver the axle until aligned where you want it. The jack stands will keep the truck airborne, and then ...


2

The combination of that much camber plus that much toe will cause it to wear more quickly, but there's not much you can do about it without getting extreme in swapping parts. Keep rotating those tires so you don't burn out just the one and don't worry about it too much as I expect it would cost a lot more money to fix than you'll spend in extra tire costs. ...


2

They change the boot and make sure joints are within tolerances and maybe remove some rust and maybe spray or rust treat them. They are not new but recycled and or refurbished to a "new" like state.


1

I've got two strong suspicions. First is the pinion angle Paulster2 calls out - it's common with a shackle lift or SOA lift that the axle gets rolled so the rear driveshaft won't need replacing (too short with the lift). That's hellish on u-joints. if the transfer case end doesn't start with a CV joint, you simply cannot get away with an ordinary u-joint at ...


1

My preferred method is to remove the four bolts that hold the two A arms on (14 mm where the A arms attach to the frame) there will be plenty of play in the assembly to move it out of the way, give the axle a good yank and it will come out of the front differential, for the outside boot (I have never gotten one of them apart with out destroying it) I either ...


1

By all means yes. It is a good practice to grease the axle prior installation.


1

Found an interesting thread at allsentra.com. Some choice bits from one of the posts: Many Nissan Sentra rear axles are mismanufactured with a huge toe in. Nissan actively discourages/forbids delearships to put in shims to correct the rear alignment. Specific Nissan Sentra calibrated shims can be obtained from rockauto or NAPA. Look under ...


1

There is likely a seal that holds your gear oil in place on the shaft. Also, assuming you bought these online and installed yourself, did you verify them to be the same length and also that the shaft sat all the way into its seat? If it did not seat it could have wiggle room that allows it to slide in and out, instead of flex.


1

ih8mud.com forums is a great resource for land cruisers with an extremely loyal following - I own an 80 series and use it for reference and help for all kinds of maintenance.



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