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18

I really think that it's more of a naming convention issue but there is a marked difference between 4x4 and AWD. In 4x4 all the wheels are "guaranteed" power. Power is sent from the engine to the transfer case and then the transfer case sends it to the front axle and rear axle. The reason I put guaranteed in quotes is because there is such a thing as full ...


11

My first thoughts, given the car is question, would be to check to see if there is a performance version of the car which features four wheel drive. For road use, if you have over 300bhp going through the front wheels, things can get difficult. A friend of mind had a 320bhp Seat Leon Cupra (Front wheel drive) and sold it to buy an Audi S3 (same basic ...


10

One of the things the other answers neglected to mention and is probably the key point between AWD and 4x4 is that AWD transfer cases will almost always be a single speed differential. The 4x4 will almost always have 4-wheel high and 4-wheel low ranges and be selectable. This provides more torque if the driver deems the situation to need it. 4x4 may also ...


8

They likely do hold some liability, since they should have known that an AWD should have matching tire diameters across all tires. They may argue that you hold some responsibility since the Impreza owners manual makes this pretty clear: . You must install four tires that are of the same size, circumference, construction, manufacturer, brand (tread ...


5

Before you start, I'd have a good read of the rules applying to it - I seem to remember that Germany is very strict on heavily modified cars, so you might well find there are restrictions on what you can do to it - modifying the monocoque (chassis/bodyshell) to allow the fitment of a propshaft and rear drive axle might well be restricted, or involve huge ...


4

Jerking and thumping when shifting through gears is an indication that you have bad either: bad engine mounts bad transmission mounts bad differential mounts bad axles a combination or all of the above Shifting into neutral does relieve the "tension", as you put it, but you need to care care of these issues. They can end up being costly.


4

4WD has the best traction in off road conditions, which is mainly what most larger vehicles are used for. As well as this, 4WD offers better fuel economy which is generally more favorable in a larger vehicle as these will already have a greater fuel consumption due to their added weight. You are correct about AWD being at least as good in conditions such as ...


3

It's unlikely that 2WD will save you a lot more fuel than AWD but it will save you more than zero. 2WD will definitely save you fuel over the 4WD Lock setting. The reality is that, no matter what setting you use, the engine still has to move the same mass of metal down the road. I.e., maximum efficiency is bounded. That said, in 2WD mode, you are avoiding ...


3

Short answer. Yes. Your vehicle could be pulling to the right for several reasons. It could be uneven tire wear (which would likely have been caused by an alignment issue), tire pressure (which you've checked), wheel damage (which you've checked) or misalignment. One thing you might try before going for an alignment is making sure that all four of your ...


3

This is pieced together from articles about this and the talk we had from a Tesla rep at the car leasing company I work for. The improved range of the dual motor setup arises from the front and rear gearboxes (one per motor, nothing interlinking them) having different ratios. Electric motors have a rpm range in which they operate most efficiently, having ...


1

I am not an expert but I read in an article somewhere when Tesla introduced the P85D that the dual-motor version is more efficient at putting power to the wheels since it can use all four wheels instead of just the rear wheels. This even offsets the increased weight of the dual-motor setup and translates to a 2% increase in range.


1

Look, I agree with the tyre rack article to a certain extent. But let's all use a little common sense. Using their example (as I do) in rotating my full size spare on my Wrangler. Even when I swap out at every tyre rotation the act of not using 1 tyre for that set of 5000 miles creates a tyre circumference difference of about 1/8" of an inch. So by there ...



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