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6

First thing I'd check is that it's got the AWD driveline - there should be a driveshaft from the gearbox in the front connecting to a diff at the rear "axle", plus driveshafts from each rear wheel to the diff. If that's missing, well, there's your problem... Assuming it has an AWD driveline, my suspicion would be that the center diff that is supposed to ...


4

Does anyone have a definitive answer as to which option I should choose? I do: you need matching tires. That said, it's your car and you have to make the decision. I'd tend to replace all four. @Paulster2 also makes a good point that you could shave down a new one to match. Let's start by looking at one of the most useful paragraphs from the ...


4

Different outer tire diameters creates a different rate of rotation for each wheel. Depending on the design of the differential, maintaining higher speeds for a lengths of time with great enough differences in rotational speeds can create too much heat, which I imagine leads to break down of the lubrication and damage to the differential. It would be wise ...


4

This is something I've commonly heard said, usually by tire salesmen, but I do not buy. The difference in speed of the rotating tires between 6/32" is very small and likely less than many other factors such as alignment and tire inflation differences. The differentials are meant to handle small differences between the different tires rotation speeds and ...


4

See Is it OK to replace only 2 tires on an AWD car?. If you call different Audi dealers you're likely to get differing answers regarding how much tread depth difference is OK for the all-wheel-drive system. Nonetheless, I would advocate calling to get specific recommendations for your vehicle, as some all-wheel drive systems are more sensitive to ...


3

"It depends"... I've historically opted to replace all 4 just to be safe (on my AWD with 3 LSD beast, on the RWD open diff I replace 1 at a time if needed :-) ). In theory a small difference won't blow up the transfer case or the diffs (there's always at least a TINY difference anyways). Normal wear with a normal rotation obviously doesn't violate the ...


2

You can check the rear toe in exactly the same way you check the front toe -- using the same string setup, parallel to the car's centerline, measure the distance from the string to the leading and trailing edges of the wheel. One thing to be careful of is that the rear tread (a.k.a. track) may be different than the front. When you're lining up your string, ...


2

The general consensus on this is that it depends where you are intending to go - you want something that is common in the local area so that parts are readily available. The two standard choices are Land Rover (either Defender or Discovery) or Toyota (LandCruiser or Hilux) - Land Rovers tend to be more common in Africa, Toyotas are more common in Asia. Both ...


2

The first step is to pull the ABS codes. That will give us a starting point for trouble shooting. This model supports flash codes, you will need to jump across terminal A and H of the ALDL connector (under the drivers side of the dash). It may take about 30 seconds before the ABS light starts flashing codes. Count the flashes to get the code, they ...


2

It matters, but how much it matters varies from vehicle to vehicle. TireRack has an article about this topic -> Matching Tires on Four-Wheel Drive and All-Wheel Drive Vehicles Here is the Manufacture Specific info from the end of the article: Here are recommendations from some of the manufactures that Tire Rack currently serves for matching the tires ...


2

I've heard it many times, but never seen any proof. See the question and my answer to this post. I have never read about it in any of the Factory Service Manuals I have been through, so I shelve it up as false. I think the idea is that new fluid, with all the fresh detergents, shock dirt and debris loose and cause problems. Again, never seen it happen.


2

Just as a note, awd systems I worked on in the past had a limit of 1 inch difference in circumference of any tire to avoid abnormal wear of the transfer case. And I did see several cases where the chain the case was already stretched with a bad jerking on take off, and new tires fixed the symptom although of course the underlying cause remained.


1

FWIW, I've driven an AWD Volvo XC90 several times before and that was my experience as well. If that's normal, then it's the worst AWD system I've ever driven. Had terrible torque steer under hard acceleration, and front wheelspin was a major issue on loose surfaces. Didn't think much about it (even though it was new when I first drove it, and continued ...



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