New answers tagged

1

The best way to fix this is to use flared butt ended fittings, or to replace the line whole. The rubber, while it will hold, is still the weak link in the chain. Over time it will weaken and wear, and ultimately fail. Using the dual ended but joint like I have pictured below (or something like this), if installed correctly, will not fail any sooner than the ...


0

The correct terminology is "to park the car". This is what I've been taught on an automatic transmission: Come to a complete stop in "D". Put shifter into "N". Apply parking brake, release service brake to let the car rest completely on the parking brake. Put shifter into "P" (most cars do not need the service brake to be applied when going up into "P", ...


0

How to Stop a Car (Correct Way) 1.Press the brake pedal 2.Pull up hand brake 3.Move gear from "D" (or "R") to "P" 4.Release the brake pedal 5.Press the "press to start" button to stop the engine Why? You want the handbrake to hold the car stationary. You don't want to stress the Parking gear, it can fail without warning. Once in a while you'll want to test ...


-1

How would stop at traffic lights? Press the brake pedal Apply the parking brake Release the brake pedal All you're doing when stopping "completely" is adding to the end of this sequence: Put the transmission in "P" Push the button to stop the engine


4

You may not need do it one way or another, but the correct habit would be to stop and then Park the vehicle before turning it off. Why? Well, you're not doing any damage making the selection on the gearbox if the engine is running. You set the vehicle's controls appropraitely and the last thing you do is turn it off. Consider the opposite, do you put the ...


1

If the car is fully stopped then either way is fine. Neither will cause damage to your car. I however would recommend getting into the habit putting it into park first then cutting the engine because if you cut the engine first you may forget to put it in park later. If it is still in drive the car could potentially roll away.


4

You may not have a choice. On many "button cars" you cannot just kill the engine while the transmission is still in gear. This is a safety feature to prevent you from bumping it and turning off the engine on the highway by accident. You really don't need to change how you stopped the car from when you had keys, just push the button instead of turning the ...


0

Apart from the other answers, it does happen that transmissions are not fully rebuilt. There are degrees of cost/effort. It is very common for parts to be re-used. Planetary gears, solenoids are often re-used. "Steels"/clutch pack discs are replaced. The "hard parts" (gears) may add thousands to the cost but will reduce noise considerably.


0

A mechanic looked at it and determined the steering lock was the problem. He replaced it and it works now. I don't know what exactly was wrong and how a bad steering lock caused all that. I don't know what caused it. I remember the driver was fidgeting trying to get it started. Could trying to turn the key in a certain way do it? I remember this happened ...


4

I know that this is an old question, but I want to provide a brief answer. Amount of work that is necessary to fix anything inside the transmission is very close to the amount of work that is necessary to do the rebuild (on average). Your average Rebuild = replace friction plates, and replace rubber seals (sometimes they come only in a kit) + replace and ...


0

Could be the 3-4 upshift solenoid as well as the torque convertor clutch solenoid is bad? The upshift solenoid failing would explain why 4th doesn't stay engaged and if the torque remains engaged when downshifting could explain the low rpm. I would be interested about the 7 major problems -sounds like major money for mechanic... I would take it to a ...


0

http://transmissionrepairguy.com/transmission-solenoid/ There are 6 solenoids in a automatic transmission (from the transmission guy repair website) Torque convertor clutch solenoid, 2-3 upshift,3-2 downshift, 1-2 upshift, pressure control, Torque convertor clutch pulse width modulation solenoid valve. Transmission Solenoid: Function & Common ...


1

Brown fluid is common in higher mileage automatic transmissions, especially if they do not get regular fluid changes. Red ATF turns brown when it is worn out and the clutches in the transmission start slipping, creating friction and burning the fluid, turning it from red to brown. I don't think it is anyone's fault, its just time for a transmission ...


2

There's a lot of good answers and discussion about electrical issues and other complicated things, but to me it sounds like the steering lock is under tension and not allowing the key to turn all the way and start. If you sit in almost and car, turn it off and remove the key, and then turn the steering wheel until it clicks into the locked state. The ...


1

I don't think this is a battery problem, given the circumstances and the fact the radio and everything else still work - but it's possible repeated failed attempts to start the car while diagnosing the real problem might flatten the battery, giving you a battery problem on top of the original problem... I'd suggest getting a couple of things as a ...


2

I suspect the problem relates to a low battery. Actually turning the start motor is the most intensive process that the battery does. If it's low on change you can get the situation where other things will work but the starter won't turn. Your best course of action is to use a set of jump leads or use a charger to top up the battery and see what happens. ...


1

Shifting into neutral CANNOT, and DOES NOT allow for more controllable nor more efficient braking. Torque converters "Lock-Up" when the car is being Driven by the engine. NOT upon deceleration. When the brake pedal is depressed enough to cause the "Brake-Lights" to illuminate, the torque converter is taken OUT of the equation. Also, if operating properly, ...


1

You should leave the downshifting to the transmission. Sounds like you're doing it wrong anyway. The abrupt "jerk" that you speak of means you're going Too Fast for the gear you've selected. Of course if you're towing a heavily loaded trailer, you could manually downshift to assist the cars brakes to avoid the possibility of overheating them. But the engine ...


7

Basically, yes. Automatics don't have a clutch per se, but you're causing additional wear and tear on the internals. Basically you're reversing the power flow -- instead of the engine driving the wheels, you're driving the engine with the wheels. Obviously this occurs normally when you decelerate, but by downshifting you're increasing the amount of force ...


0

These Honda transmissions are prone to failure. Which is unfortunate. I have the same car and the transmission failed at about 130,000 miles. You can check the transmission fluid. With the engine off and the car on a level surface remove the transmission dipstick, clean and put it back in and then pull it out. Now you should see the level at the upper mark. ...


4

While the others has stated why you might want to use one of the lower gears, they aren't explaining what happens when you actually use the lower gears. On most vehicles with automatic transmissions, when you put the vehicle into "2", the transmission goes into second gear. You don't start in first gear, then shift up to second, it starts in 2nd gear. This ...


7

Two additional uses alongside engine braking controlling downhill descents: Low gear, high revs uphill on loose ground like sand If you need to go up a steep hill on loose terrain like a sandy dirty track, dune or fine gravel, you need to build up momentum before hitting the incline and you need to put your foot down and get high revs for the speed you're ...


6

The only time I've ever felt the need to use anything other than 'D' in an automatic is when towing or climbing a steep grade. That's not to say I don't play around like it's a stick shift sometimes, but as you said, it's not necessary. The other day, I had to pull a damaged car (one wheel was locked up) across an apt complex. I put the tow car in 1 in ...


12

To go down hill By setting L (or 1 or 2), the gear will stay low and you will be able to use engine brake, instead of using brakes all the way down the hill and suffering from fading. The transmission will not necessarily pick a lower gear when going downhill, although they will pick a low gear if you are going uphill. Never brake the car for an extended ...


3

This has nothing to do with the transmission. Ford uses idle strategy in their software, to reset this disconnect the battery for 15 minutes, connect back and start the car in park, do not touch anything but the key when starting, let idle for 20 minutes on its own and do not touch brake pedal or anything else during this idle re-learn period. If this ...



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