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1

You could be driving it incorrectly. An automatic transmission will switch at lower or higher RPM's depending on how hard you're pressing the gas pedal. A gas pedal is actually an air pedal. It forces more air conduction by opening the throttle body, located between your intake manifold and air filter(or cold air intake). If you suddenly push the gas pedal ...


1

If your 2006 Civic is anything like mine, there is a section in your owner's manual entitled "Towing a trailer" which should answer your first question. In mine it says to use D on level roads and D3 in hilly terrain. It would be wise to read that section carefully and completely as it contains many essential safety instructions. In particular, in mine ...


1

Time and time again when improvements are introduced, even minor changes to a vehicles spec, the ultimate end today is fuel consumption. Lower fuel consumption means lower emmissions. When you have a vehicle with say 7 speeds, you will find the engine RPM at 70 MPH on the motorway is down to around 1500 RPM. This slower engine speed allows the engine ...


1

There are two main reasons auto manufacturers have started putting more gears into their cars: acceleration and gas mileage. The main purpose of it is to keep the engine in its torque band. This is the area where the engine is working at its most efficient (improved gas mileage) and since it doesn't have to build back up to its torque band after a shift ...


2

For a car that has 4, 5, 6 and 7 gear options, if all else is the same, then your top speed will be the same; all that would change would be your acceleration: In each gear you have a range where power is at it's highest. Below this gear speed your power is low (have you ever tried to accelerate in 5th from stationary?) And above it you hit the speed ...


0

The problem could be as Allan stated with a bad solenoid, but could also be a mechanical problem with the shifter itself. If you are pressing the button (after pressing the brakes) to shift and it does not allow you to rotate the gear shifter from park, the rod from the button to the latching mechanism or the latching mechanism itself may be fouled. A fix ...


2

Under the centre console trim, surrounding the gearlever, you will find a a solonoid that engages a pin into the gearlever linkage. Release or remove this to release the gearlever. You will then need to determine the exact fault of this detent and repair it to ensure future safe starting. Possible faulty solonoid.


4

Bottom Line Up Front: Basically there is no difference. You will break either type by doing what you describe. To answer your question of why you shouldn't do neutral drops in an automatic transmission ... consider this: Internally, the transmission is made up of bands, planetary gears, clutches, steels, sprag units, servos, and at least one pump to move ...


4

Please note that I'm using descriptive terms in this answer; there is a lot more to the mechanics than I will cover. tl;dr: Yes. You certainly can damage the vehicle by shifting from N (neutral) into D (drive) when the engine is revving (not idle). In A Nutshell By dumping the clutch in a manual, a gear is already engaged and you are connecting the ...


0

This is traction control working, doing what it's supposed to do. On snow, however, it can be usually best to deactivate it, as most cars can do. It will help when getting out of the snow from stationary (if you have manual gear control, at least), but when on the move and uphill, you actually want to be able to control your wheelspin freely. If the engine ...


1

Ford have from time to time have controlled engine revs in instances like you describe. Doing so protects the CVT transmission from damage. For a while they also controlled the engine speed from idle whilst stationary, to a max of around 2500-3000rpm, across thier automatics.


6

It is quite possible that the traction control is limiting the engine power. The control module is monitoring the wheel rpm, vehicle movement and the engine rpm. If it detects wheel speed beyond the set parameters it slows the engine speed until traction is achieved. You may see a flashing light on the dash. Typically it is a triangle with an "S" shaped ...


13

There's nothing wrong with the vehicle, from what you've described. It sounds like it's doing exactly what it's supposed to. I'm not sure you understand how to get out of a slide (or snow), which admittedly isn't particularly uncommon. "Gunning it" won't help, because your wheels are more likely to spin, which just tends to dig you deeper into the snow. ...



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