Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

27

According to 2010 Prius Emergency Response Guide (page 10): Being electronic, the gearshift selector and the park systems depend on the low voltage 12 Volt auxiliary battery for power. If the 12 Volt auxiliary battery is discharged or disconnected, the vehicle cannot be started and cannot be shifted out of park. The auxiliary battery is located in the ...


23

The reason that an automatic doesn't stall out while "in gear" and at a stop, while a manual transmission does, is that automatic transmissions use a hydraulic torque converter to connect the engine to the transmission, while manual transmissions use a friction clutch. These two systems do a similar job in a very different way. A torque converter uses fluid ...


15

In addition to what Patrick said, D3, or whatever else it's called in various makes and models, is also useful for those times when you're climbing a hill and the transmission keeps shifting back and forth between gears. There may also be times, such as when driving on very slippery surfaces, when a gear shift could cause the car to lose traction. In such a ...


14

This is analagous to down shifting in a manual. This is a lower gear for the transmission which means the engine revolves at a higher rate producing more back pressure at the same speed as a higher gear. When going down a hill, if you downshift that will reduce the demands on the braking system, due to the back pressure. You will often see truck drivers ...


13

It is important to note that revving the engine on an automatic transmission car while holding the car stationary with the brakes causes premature transmission wear and early failure. This action causes the fluid to overheat. It also damages the torque converter and driveshaft or cv joints. If you look at advertisements for performance torque converters ...


12

This is one of those things which are easier said than done. To start with, let me show you a picture of a four speed transmission which has been blown apart: All of those hundreds of parts go through the front end of the transmission. If a single part is bad (which it usually is not the case), you have to pull all of this apart in order to diagnose and ...


9

If you haven't run the car yet then just drain out the reservoir. If you have run the car then some of the fluid might have started to circulate through the cooling system. If so, flush your coolant. A small amount should not affect the car's ability to stay cool. So this is not that critical, but you definitely don't want to let your engine overheat.


9

To put it bluntly, they had to implement a fuzzy logic analog computer based on hydraulics rather than a digital computer based on binary states: As usual, How Stuff Works has a reasonable introduction to the basic concepts with enough vocabulary to kick off more detailed research if you're really interested. That link will take you directly to the ...


8

You can add more fluid, but it's best to do it slowly. Your transmission has a lot of gears and tunnels and holes for transmission fluid to go, and it's important to get the fluid down in there in order to get an accurate reading on the dipstick. After adding fluid, take another ride out on the freeway for a few minutes and make sure you go through all of ...


8

Take a scrap of paper towel, touch it lightly to the top of the dipstick, and then slowly swipe it down the dipstick. You'll clearly see when it touches fluid even if the fluid is light, and you can then determine where the fluid level is on the stick.


8

Here are the exact instructions from the owner’s manual: Operations are the same except the item number three: If you cannot shift the selector lever out of “P” position to other positions even though the brake pedal is depressed, use the shift lock override button as follows: Turn the ignition key to “LOCK” position. Make sure the parking ...


8

For general driving, you can leave the car in drive. It doesn't damage the transmission leaving it in drive while stationary at the lights - although you don't want to be doing silly things like revving the engine while holding the brakes on. In an automatic car, you don't really use neutral. It is a step on the way to selecting Park, which means that the ...


7

I don't think it will make a difference on gas mileage either way. Anytime the engine is running the front pump on the transmission is being turned by the torque converter and is lubricating the transmission which is also circulating fluid through the transmission cooler. I don't see how it could cause premature failure of the transmission. Technically you ...


7

The weight of your vehicle is putting strain on your parking pawl. Apply your parking brake BEFORE putting the car in park. If the problem persists either your brakes are worn out/ maladjusted or your parking brake cables are stretched.


7

The main purpose of neutral on an automatic is for towing or pushing the car. Obviously you can't push it with the transmission in park, and if you tow it with the transmission in gear or in park and the drive wheels are in contact with the ground, you'll ruin your transmission or your tires or both. I'm sure there are some other uses too, but they're ...


7

The first thing to check is the shifter linkage. If it uses a cable the cable my be frayed on the inside of the casing causing the friction. You may also have some other part of the linkage binding up, but my money is on the cable itself. It doesn't seem likely that it would be an internal transmission problem.


7

There's nothing wrong with the vehicle, from what you've described. It sounds like it's doing exactly what it's supposed to. I'm not sure you understand how to get out of a slide (or snow), which admittedly isn't particularly uncommon. "Gunning it" won't help, because your wheels are more likely to spin, which just tends to dig you deeper into the snow. ...


6

Think of it this way. If you need to brake so incredibly hard that you're worried the automatic transmission is getting in the way, you're better off worrying about things besides whether or not you're in neutral. You're probably about to crash or lose control, so train yourself to concentrate on steering, or making sure you're arms are out of the way of ...


5

Short answer for Transmissions, Yes. DEXRON®-VI licensed fluids are fully backward compatible and can be used in all applications covered by earlier GM ATF specifications." "DEXRON®-VI replaces DEXRON®-III and DEXRON®-III-H in all applications except power steering and manual transmissions All DEXRON-III licenses expired at the ...


5

Being in Neutral or Drive should have negligible to no effect on the distance the vehicle travels when the accelerator is not pressed because the torque converter disengages the engine below predetermined RPM levels. However, if you somehow were to push just a little too hard and sent the transmission into Reverse instead of stopping in Neutral, you would ...


5

A lot of newer cars are smart about shifting (they have electronic solenoids to control the hydraulics). I can put my 2001 Nissan Pathfinder in reverse at 50 MPH, and it's smart enough to not engage, it goes into neutral. However, at speeds below its cutoff point (I've done it at about 15 MPH and regretted it), you can put a lot of stress on the drivetrain ...


5

putting brakes on while waiting on a red light while your gear is in D can damage the braking system? In general, no, you're fine. I think you've conflated several issues that can lead to issues (if not actual problems): If you were sitting at a light in drive (D) with your left foot on the brakes hard and your right foot flooring the ...


5

They will probably work out to be the same. An automatic transmission is inherently more complicated which means more can go wrong and usually does (more so than manuals). The increased complexity also makes them more expensive, heavier, less fuel efficient etc. A manual transmission is less complicated which means there is less that can go wrong. Through ...


5

What you are describing is a normal condition. The drive axle is connected to the Drive Pinion Gear which is meshed with both Differential pinion gears. As you turn the wheel both of the differential pinion gears rotate around the other drive pinion gear since it's being held by the other wheel on the ground. This turns the Carrier which is attached to the ...


5

It is quite possible that the traction control is limiting the engine power. The control module is monitoring the wheel rpm, vehicle movement and the engine rpm. If it detects wheel speed beyond the set parameters it slows the engine speed until traction is achieved. You may see a flashing light on the dash. Typically it is a triangle with an "S" shaped ...


4

That sounds pretty strange to me. I'll admit I don't know a lot about automatic transmissions, but with a manual gearbox I would always drain all the fluid when changing it. As gearboxes wear, small metal filings accumulate, and one of the reasons for changing the oil is to get rid of these filings which, if left to build up unchecked, cause even more wear. ...


4

In most cars it's a major operation and quite expensive. There's usually body and mount modifications that need to be made. You'll need the new trans and all the controls. Some cars have a different ECU and wiring harness for each transmission. Possibly vacuum system modifications. Sometimes it even requires changing out drive/halfshafts, etc. What ...


4

Follow the vehicle's designated maintenance schedule. If it says you should change the automatic transmission fluid at a mileage near or below 120k, then change it. If not, then don't. The manual for your 2004 Pontiac Vibe states: Change automatic transaxle fluid every 60,000 miles (100 000 km) if the vehicle is mainly driven under one or more of ...


4

If "injector cleaning" products helped but only lasted for one tank, I would try spraying Seafoam directly in at the throttle plate rather than putting an additive in your fuel. This should be a lot more effective at cleaning the injectors. If that doesn't help, my best guess would be that the vibration is from unequal power from one or more of the ...


4

Most likely you have a bad 4th gear pressure switch. It seems to be a common problem. I had worked at a Honda dealer for 20 years, and replaced a lot of them.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible