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10

It doesn't take as many wires as you think, and they just add additional circuits to the clockspring. The clockspring was introduced with drivers side airbags to maintain a continuous electrical connection for the airbag while allowing the steering wheel to turn. The manufacture simply added a few additional circuits to accommodate steering wheel controls. ...


4

Many sites including Crutchfield have charts that will tell you what equipment fits in your car. You need to make sure that the radio will fit where the factory radio comes out, there are adapters that make installation very easy. You will need the correct electrical adapter so you can plug the aftermarket stereo into your existing wiring harness. You should ...


4

Because waveforms are only at the peak for a very short period of time, the most useful figure for amplifiers is RMS - which actually gives a realistic number for the power requirement. That said, you want a speaker to cope with peaks, as these are what will kill it. Generally subwoofers do give both figures, as they are fed the greatest power in your audio ...


4

The Aux port is simply an SPDIF (3.5mm headphone) port that turns your car stereo into an expensive set of speakers for your MP3 player. It doesn't do anything fancy like "communicating" with your device, aside from accepting incoming audio. I don't know anything about your specific car, but generally you switch your car's audio system to Aux-in mode when ...


3

So you want to keep the factory amp? I wouldn't suggest that. I'd recommend getting rid of the factory amp altogether, they're usually not the best, and it would be difficult - if not impossible - for them to work together. I google'd for a quick sanity check and I'll post a snippet from WikiAnswers: I wouldn't...first most after market amps require a ...


3

The difference is solely in size. A double-DIN gives you more space, but at the end of the day what you should be looking at is what will fit in your car, and this may be hidden behind fascia. My dash will only fit a double DIN, but because I have a single DIN sound system, I use the other half as a storage space.


3

I was looking for the same thing recently on a 94 Accord (different radio harness). Just looked around again to see if there's a solution on the 03-07 Honda radios and here are the results: On some units you can solder into the aux interface. Otherwise you can cheat the radio into using its CD/Nav/XM expansion plug as an aux input. This usually requires an ...


3

You can also get source sensing amplifiers, which will further make this simpler. If they detect signal from your smartphone, they'll turn on, if not, it'll turn off after some amount of delay. The next question is whether or not you can (or would want to) hook your smartphone or other source directly to an amplifier. It might work, it might not. There ...


3

What you need is a simple switch. Here's an example of one that you can order from DigiKey. Your radio will use two wires for powering itself, the ground (GND) and V+. The ground wire should be grounded, that is connected to negative (-) terminal of the battery. The V+ wire should be connected to one connector of the switch. Battery positive terminal (+) ...


3

As in your comment, typically they are one of the following: Have tabs that require you to use a flat tool (ie screwdriver) to pop them out Have small push in plastic pieces that surround a screw hole. Pop the plastic piece out, then unscrew the panel Hidden screws somewhere. You may find that you have to remove a surrounding panel via the screwdriver ...


3

For the best sound quality you want your speakers as high and as far forward as possible. This will result in the best imaging and staging possible. Which means that it sounds like a band is on stage infront of you and you can individually pick out where each instrument is coming from vocal, bass, drums, rhythm, lead, etc... The lower the frequency the less ...


2

Panels like that are usually removed after removing the head unit. I'm guessing from the picture that it is an aftermarket unit, so you should be able to get an appropriate removal tool (these vary according to the make of the head unit) from your local car accessories shop. Use the tool(s) to remove the head unit, and you'll find a metal cage behind it, ...


2

I am not sure why you say the FM transmitter didn't work well. I tried this transmitter and there were no troubles at all. FM Transmitter


2

If you're not terribly concerned about audio quality, get a cheap head unit off eBay or amazon that has an auxiliary input.. There are several some options under $25 on amazon. You'll likely need a wiring harness, as well, but it looks like that runs only about $2.85 on amazon for your vehicle.


2

Unfortunately the DIN standard is less and less supported, so it is becoming much harder - you may need to make your own mounting brackets. In terms of wiring, there are many standards for wiring pin-outs, however the vast majority require just a continuous and a switched 12v in and GND so you can either use an aftermarket adapter kit (mentioned by @Larry) ...


2

Most aftermarket stereos should conform to the DIN standard (ISO 7736), which defines the height and width of the enclosure. As Larry says, you can then get adapters to fit these into those cars that don't conform to the same standard. I don't know if it's the same in the states, but most European cars I have come across have a DIN socket, but often ...


2

Something could be wrong with your iPhone connection wire/connectors, perhaps it has bad or missing ground line signal. When ground signal is missing the receiver plays the difference between the audio channels - and it often has the voice "ommited", as the voice is common in both channels and music slightly differs due to 3D positioning. Check your ...


2

For troubleshooting, here are some things to try: Adjust the balance on your stereo to see if you can hear the crackling more to the left or the right, or both. Similarly you can adjust the fade to front / rear to see if the crackling is more in the front or the back. Once you have determined which speaker is causing the crackling, turn the stereo volume ...


2

Can you say which version/year your Civic is? Recent Civics got an AUX IN (audio Auxiliary in) port where you can plug it in. This is normally on driver's side, bottom of the dash. Otherwise you'll have to buy an extension panel (I'm not sure this is the 'official name for it') which replaces your CD changer. What it does it, simply connects to the audio ...


2

Many amplifiers have low-level inputs using RCA style connections. You can use one of those with a RCA to 1/8" stereo jack for your phone. Switching it could be accomplished through a switch like you mentioned or hopefully there's an ignition-only wire that can be used on the amplifier. They typically have an ignition input just used to switch the power.


2

I've experienced the same first set of symptoms due to an aftermarket stereo installed in my car by the previous owner. One of the wires came loose and was shorting out against the metal in the center console. The circuit was fused, but it had a slow-blow fuse and eventually on a long drive (after a couple weeks of weird dimming lights and loss of power) ...


2

The only difference between single and double DIN is the size of the unit. However double DIN units often have added features like touch screens, dvd, and navigation features which require the extra space for mounting. Many double din units will use the same audio processors and DACs that the single din units of the same brand do, so they often have the ...


2

Door speakers should not suffer problems such as you describe. Mounting them is actually very straightforward, and if the doors already have space for speakers, I would definitely use them. I have fitted speakers in the parcel shelf in cars before, and it does provide some more depth and clarity to the sound, as the sound bounces off the rear windscreen and ...


2

Hatchback or not - it does not makes a lot of difference. I would go for doors and install speakers there. After all car manufacturer specifically designed so. When choosing the speakers make sure they fit depth-wise, some might have too big magnets on them. Having speakers in my doors for 16 years now - they work perfectly, no corrosion whatsoever. The ...


1

The wiring controlling the seatbelt warning lamp will be connected to the seatbelt stalk (i.e. the bit you plug the belt into). Depending on how this is fixed to the car it may indeed go through the seat. At its most simple, it is simply two contacts that are bridged by the belt buckle to close a circuit, and if that is the case then simply bridging the ...


1

I second mac’s reply. A couple things to keep in mind when buying an A2DP receiver: Make sure the receiver turns on automatically when you start the car. Look for a receiver that can pair with more than one phone, i.e. if you have a passenger that wants to play music from their device.


1

You need an A2DP receiver, these typically output to a 3.5mm male audio plug. A quick google search will yield many options. All require power of some sort. Some are rechargeable or can be charged by USB, which I would imagine would be best for your application. one option at newegg: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA07Y0AG5963


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I have not been able to find any good documentation online for the speaker sizes of a VW Polo. Your best bet is to do it the old fashioned way - take out the speakers and measure them. If you're going to replace the speakers then you have to take them out eventually anyways. There is a good article on eHow for measuring car speakers for replacement.


1

Searching found several options, but I am not sure if these are refering to the same radio you have. If you are not comfortable taking the radio apart there are repair services that will do it for you. How to fix your e36 dim radio display This site offers a DIY repair kit for the back-light if this is your radio They also offer a repair service if ...


1

Have you tried making sure that, for all your speakers in the car, the wire that hooks into the back of them could be loose and could be wiggling around when driving and causing it to go from bad to good connection which would cause the problem you're having. I had this same exact problem in my Honda Civic Also, have you made sure that all your speakers are ...



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