New answers tagged

0

I know this is an old thread, and my answer doesnt actually pertain to the specific question, but i think it can help anyways. If you are having issues with the car not starting sometimes, you should look at the alternator pulley, and/or all the other pulleys in conjunction with the belts around the alternator. If you see that the top of each "v groove" in ...


1

The sound you are hearing is most likely the bearings going (gone) bad in the alternator. As @resident_heretic suggested, removing the belt and checking the alternator by hand is a good suggestion. You can also isolate the sound by using an automotive stethoscope (can be bought at Harbor Freight for $5). Even if you don't have that, you can isolate the ...


0

Judging by noise alone.... Could be a belt tensioner pulley or the alternator fan (the little metal thing on the front of the alternator with fins) scraping on something. One way to test is to remove the belt and turn the alternator manually. It could also the belt itself. Hard to be sure just by sound alone.


3

The main thing your battery has to do it start the car, and act as a 'buffer' for the alternator. Starting the car is by far the highest load on the battery. Most car batteries are rated in Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) to determine how well they will turn the starter when it is cold out. The battery stores power, accessories draw power, the alternator feeds ...


1

After much messing about, research, cut hands and many a swear word I got it off. In the UK (where I'm from) something was recommended to me on another forum called Plus Gas. It's a penetration fluid, like WD40, but better. It's thicker and stays around much longer than WD40. I sprayed this on the hinge of the bracket and started to pull it back and forth. ...


2

This test is rudimentary, but efficient. Testing the battery voltage with the car off tells you the current state of the battery (can it hold a charge) Testing the battery voltage with the car on tells you the state of the alternator (can it recharge the battery) Measuring the battery draw while you are starting the car tells you the current state of the ...


2

It depends what tools you have available and whether you are replacing the alternator. I would probably resort to using my air hacksaw to cut through the bolt just inside each end of the bracket. This will release the alternator. The alternator should be reusable, maybe just needing a washer or two to make up the space cut by the hacksaw. Of course you ...


2

Sounds to me more an alternator problem: I ran with a problem like that precisely this year, and was the alternator brushes being dirty making a poor electrical contact inside the alternator. That will make the alternator not provide enough juice. My experience is that regulators "work or won't work". Also check the alternator belt. Under load or sudden ...


1

You need a 65 Amps, 125 mm Stator Diameter, 12 V alternator. The exact one is mentioned in the link: VW Rabbit 1.6 Non AC alternator


2

It appears the following are rebuilt replacements for your alternator: WPS/Power Select PN: 14970N Pure Energy PN: 14778 Remy PN: 14918 The difference (it appears) between the AC to non-AC unit is the Amperage output: AC=90A; non-AC=65A. You will probably want to get a replacement alternator which has the capacitor (externally connected part as you've ...


4

Common things that can shut a car down after starting: bad or disconnected idle air control valve (hold the accelerator down after starting, see if it keeps the engine alive) bad or disconnected mass airflow sensor bad ignition switch blocked fuel filter (test your fuel pressure) weak fuel pump (test your fuel pressure with the engine off but the key at ...


1

There's a 10ga fusible link on the cable from the alternator to starter. This needs to be replaced with a new cable or you can generally buy a new fusible link and crimp or solder it in place. As to the why when a always hot cable shorts to ground it's basically a circuit with no load to limit the amount of amps. One of three things happen, a fuse blows if ...


1

This sounds more like a brush problem to me. The diode test information sounds like they are fine. If the brushes are worn and not making solid contact with the armature the alternator cannot produce the amperage needed.


4

First the disclaimer: I don't know much about motorcycles – really all I know about motorcycles is inferred from cars and bicycles. But I do know a fair amount about electrical systems. That said… TL;DR – the headlight may have put your system out of balance by enough that your battery can't make up for the additional load and the alternator is always ...


3

Firstly, please add more information: What is to make and model of you bike? What are the exact modifications you've done (with spec of the components)? Now, when you say "under full load" I assume that you mean with all optional electrical system on and at full settings (like with the high beam on). If that's what you mean, then your horn will function ...


1

I have seen vehicles with multiple alternators, such as BASS competitions. I can hook up 2 alternators to my car but have seen 10 to 15 alternators hooked up to the subwoofer competition trucks. There would have to be enough power to run a small 5kbtu rv ac unit through your sunroof (with a custom painted fiberglass roof scoop to cover the whole unit ...


0

Have the charging system load tested and make sure the battery is fully charged 12.5v or better. I'd avoid disconnecting parts or pulling fuses until you can identify the source of the draw. There are too many computers and circuits that stay active when you turn off the ignition. If you have a multimeter voltage drop test the fuses by placing the leads ...


1

I would try using a multimeter that can measure DC current to see which circuits are drawing power with the ignition off. The radio should draw some, and the alarm (if your car has one) and whatever circuit handles the remote door locks, but other than that there shouldn't be anything drawing any power. Make sure there aren't any lights or anything that aren'...


0

This is the kind of question that is hard to answer, there are so many possibilities and they depend on the amount and type of sludge and the specific alternator and the phase of the moon and how long the sludge has been there and on and on. If the source who suggested cleaning it seems credible, then your odds are better… It is possible that the alternator ...


1

One option might be to change alternators to one with a higher output, the battery really should only be there to handle starting and intermittent loads (like your horn). The bulk of the electrical load should be handled by the alternator. Another question I'd ask is how much are you loosing by running the headlight on DC (which I think you're converting ...


0

It seems like bad diodes in the rectifier could force the voltage regulator to run the alternator at a higher duty cycle than normal at idle which would create extra drag on the engine, especially if the electrical load is high enough to cause the alternator to be close to full fielded in order to get enough output through the remaining good diodes.


0

Well, it seems that part of the reason the voltage didn't match is because I was using a very cheap multimeter. I got a good Uni-T meter and with the engine off my cheap meter was showing 12.92v and the Uni-T was showing 12.74v. This was after I'd been driving around a bit, so I'm sure there was still a bit of surface charge. I checked again later and can ...


2

No, it's not free. It's just that compared to everything else going on in the car, the power to charge your phone is insignificant. You could ask a similar question: "where does the power come from to drive the speakers when I turn up the volume on the car stereo?". In both cases, the answer is: all other things being equal, the extra power comes from the ...


4

Your premise is backwards. Max output and sufficient output aren't the same thing. Your own numbers show that alternators provide sufficient output to keep the battery fully charged at idle. If they didn't, cars couldn't idle for very long as the battery would drain down. As indicated in the other answers to this question, the faster the alternator spins, ...


0

You will need to have your battery load tested. Autozone or similar performs this service at no charge. Assuming that you have driven the vehicle for some length of time, the new alternator should have charged your battery sufficiently- or perhaps not- that is why it should be tested.


6

If an alternator could provide its full output capacity at idle, what would it output at red line? Output amperage is proportional to rotational speed of the alternator. Via gearing, an alternator could be made to spin faster at idle and produce its full amperage. However, at high RPM it would then be exceeding the speed at which it's designed to ...


18

Cost is the main reason. An alternator that can provide full charging current would be far larger requiring bigger rotor and stator windings. This would make it more expensive and heavier. The manufacturers are using the fact that you only spend a small amount of time idling compared to driving to their advantage. Most cars are designed to cruise at ...



Top 50 recent answers are included