New answers tagged

-1

On my son's 2005 Altima he was having to jump start it frequently. The battery tested good. The local mechanic said the alternator was bad so I replaced it with a rebuilt from AutoZone. Charge light never came on.Same problem, every day or so a jump start was required. Thinking the battery may be testing good but actually be bad I replaced it with the ...


1

I think there may be one or two things happening here (but this is more of a gut check than anything): The serpentine belt is worn out, causing the battery not to charge the battery correctly. Usually if the belt is getting worn out, it will cause a chirping sound when it slips, but if the belt is worn and glazed, it could be slipping without you even ...


3

There'd be no way to tell for sure if something was frying them, but would suggest to you this would be highly unlikely. It is completely within reason for the rebuilt alternator to have gone bad ... that's why they have a warranty. Yes, it's a PITB to take on and off, but at least it didn't cost you anymore than an extra trip to the store.


3

This sounds like a regulator fault. I sell these alternators daily, and we cannot get the regulator as a spare part (well, not here in NZ, anyway). The alternator has a feedback terminal to the ECU. If it does it again, give the alternator connector a clean and see if it goes away. If it does, the issue is a loose connection. If it doesn't, then the issue ...


2

In my experience batteries that are not regularly charged will be dead after about 3 months. A car battery after sitting idle for a year most likely not accept a charge. Time to replace the battery.


2

Since the car sat for a year, it is likely the battery is dead. If the battery terminals are corroded, they could also be preventing the alternator from charging the battery. I would try starting the car with a known good battery, and/or taking the dead battery to a parts store to be tested, as you may still be able to recharge and use it. Next time you park ...


1

Recheck the wires that connect the battery and the alternator. Do you get power anywhere else in the car? Lights? When you turn the key? Your new battery could be bad. If so, you could try jumping the car, and it should keep running if the alternator is good. If it starts but doesnt keep running when you disconnect everything, then alternator is bad. If it ...


1

You could have bent the shaft. That would cause it to shake and add drag.


0

The bearings inside could be going bad and cause some load,but normally there would be some squeaking or grinding sounds. There could be some mechanical load produced by a large electrical load on the alternator too.


3

As I commented in your very similar question about alternator voltage, where you are measuring voltage and where the ECU does are two different locations. Voltage drop test all the main battery cables and wiring.


2

I'm concerned about leaving the inverter on when the car is parked and draining the battery. How hard would it be to wire the inverter so that it is only enabled when the engine is running, or at least when the accessories are on? For a 500 W inverter you should use a relay rated at 50A minimum (see resident_heretic's calculations). The schematic should be ...


3

With inverters you also have to take into consideration the efficiency of the inverter itself when calculating power requirement. For example: 12V outlet is rated at about 10A or 120W. Inverter is 87% efficient. 120W * .87 = 104.4 W =Max size of inverter to use is 100W You can use a battery isolator -check at places that sell equipment for RV's. A ...


3

There is a long bolt underneath that the alternator pivots on to adjust drive belt tension. If you are sure you have this out, the alternator is simply cocked on the mounting ears and jammed. It may take some wiggling and gentle persuasion.


2

Different year same engine. Your image Loosen the idler pulley nut. And per the posted image loosen the adjuster to remove the belt. You don't have to remove the AC compressor to R&R the alternator on the 1.8. You can remove the fan shroud to access the lower bolt on the alternator and pull the alternator through the top.


5

Try to get hold of a workshop manual; failing that, a Chiltons or Haynes manual for that car. I've just checked the Haynes, and it does show the Alternator replacement in some detail. A couple of major hints; firstly, you get much better access going in through the passenger wheel-well. Take the wheel off, and the plastic shield between the wheel-well and ...


4

Based off this diagram, the adjusting bolt is not present in the pictures you provided: It looks like your Sentra has air-conditioning, which means that your belt tensioning mechanism sits above the power steering pump (leftmost belt-driven component).


0

Yes the tensioner is to the left of the alternator - in the pictures above. Slightly loosen the main bolt on the tensioner - not too much. This will allow you to loosen the adjustment rod BEHIND the tensioner, which creates slack and loosens the belt. You should be able to see it - it will look like a threaded rod. Probably a good time to replace the belt ...



Top 50 recent answers are included