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5

I've even been told that you have to get the alignment done when the tires are new so they will allow the wheels to sit evenly and that worn tires will invalidate the alignment process since the wheels would then be "aligned" to the wear pattern. This is not true; the tire wear pattern has no affect on the measurements or adjustments. If the ...


5

You can get an alignment at any time. It's often a good idea to get one when you get new tires, just so you don't mess them up if you have any alignment issues. However, you should also get one done if you have any kind of suspension work done (new shock absorbers, new tie rods, etc.) While you probably don't need to have one done if your tire wear is even, ...


2

I also have a Camry, mine is a 2000 LE, 4 cylinder. It has the shimmy issue when stopping. There are several possible causes for this: The front brake rotors have more run-out than they should. I don't remember what the spec is, but if this is the problem, they should be replaced rather than machined. If I had to guess it's 3 or 4 thousandths of an inch is ...


3

Short answer. Yes. Your vehicle could be pulling to the right for several reasons. It could be uneven tire wear (which would likely have been caused by an alignment issue), tire pressure (which you've checked), wheel damage (which you've checked) or misalignment. One thing you might try before going for an alignment is making sure that all four of your ...


3

You will have to replace one or both wheels to make sure you have matching sizes on both sides. Note that in many jurisdictions having non-matching tyres on an axle will fail safety/roadworthyness inspections (or side-of-the-road checks)


6

I'm afraid the only way to resolve this is to get matching width wheels plus matching sized tyres across the back axle. Even with the same sized tyres on different width wheels, the effective surface and sidewall profile shown to the road will be different. You may have success trying to find a second hand set of wheels cheaply or even buy an incomplete ...


2

It could be you have a bad tire. If the belts are not put onto the tire correctly, the tire comes out malformed and can cause vibrations. The easiest way to tell this is by rotating your tire front to rear on the problem side to see if the vibration changes. Ultimately, this is a dealer issue. All new vehicles come with what is called an "adjustment ...


0

I'd take it to a different garage if you don't trust the first one - and I wouldn't pay more than ~£5/wheel for balancing - but then I'd also never go to a garage that charged extra for it, the vast majority include it in the cost of fitting the new tyres. (I also refuse to go anywhere near one garage local to me after they charged me £2 extra for Nitrogen ...


8

One "at home" option is to use a manual wheel balancer like this model: These are normally used for people that want to balance their own trailer tires or for off-road vehicles, but in many cases you can do a good enough job to balance a car tire with one. Of course, once you pay $70-$90 USD for the device and buy a set of wheel weights and take the time ...


-2

No, you need a machine to balance wheels. If a wheel weight is off even a fraction of an inch it can throw off wheel balance. What you can do is rotate the tires and see if your problem moves to the rear.


6

Is it reasonable to expect that they should have noticed the torn LCA bushings and not done the alignment? It is reasonable to expect they should have noticed, but not unreasonable to realize everything will get noticed. I had my 72 Chevelle aligned once. The guy worked and worked on it trying to get the alignment right. Finally he kind of gave up and ...



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