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9

An alignment does not require removing the wheels. The equipment is attached to the wheels while they are in place. I often wondered about the shops that will do a free brake inspection but then charge $20 for tire rotation.


7

Issues involving steering wheel vibrations problems usually are most noticeable at one or two narrow speed ranges (5-10mph and 60-70mph), and will decrease significantly, and in some cases, even disappear outside of these ranges. The amount of vibration caused by worn tires will often be seen over a broader speed range if the tire is worn more. The severity ...


7

I'm living in a country where we need proper winter tires during that season so I have to switch between tires sets twice a year. Each switch I rotate the tires (rotation depends if the tires are direction or not) and mark the position on the one I remove for the next season to make sure to rotate them. Tire rotation is recommended (by Transport Canada and ...


6

The only thing I see of any real concern here would be the left rear toe - it's off enough to possibly cause some tire wear. However, since it can't be adjusted, your best bet is to just rotate the tires regularly (every other oil change is a good rule of thumb) and keep an eye out for wear. You didn't say which Nissan you're driving, but I'm assuming it's ...


4

You can get "in the ballpark" counting threads (if that's what you are referring to), but the computerized way is vastly more efficient. It can be done more precisely with levels, protractors, measuring tape, string, etc. If you buy a couple specialty tools (like a caster/camber gauge) it gets a little easier. HotRod.com has a decent article. In brief: ...


3

The vibration at speed is very unlikely to be the alignment. I would suggest getting your tires balanced. The most likely cause is that one is slightly out - perhaps a tire-weight fell off, or the wrong weight was put on last time you changed tires. - Bad alignment will eat your tyres faster than good alignment, but if all the shops you have been to say ...


3

The alignment goes out after a hit due to bending of components. There are three main things that are looked at during an alignment, and a couple of secondary measurements. I will only discuss the main three, which are camber, caster, and toe. The toe and camber are usually the ones that are adjusted when you get your alignment, as the caster is normally set ...


2

You basically have 3 measurements in the front, and 2 in the back that are normally adjustable unless you have a solid axle (You don't). The front caster is adjusted at the strut mount, the front/rear camber and toe normally utilize rods to adjust. The toe utilizes the tie rods in the front that are attached to your steering box, and the rear usually uses a ...


2

With respect to your original question: What is a damper? A damper (AKA strut or shock absorber) is "a mechanical device designed to dissipate kinetic energy." In it's automotive use, it works with the springs to absorb the impact of bumps and rough spots in the road before those impacts bother your car and the passengers therein. In answering a ...


2

The combination of that much camber plus that much toe will cause it to wear more quickly, but there's not much you can do about it without getting extreme in swapping parts. Keep rotating those tires so you don't burn out just the one and don't worry about it too much as I expect it would cost a lot more money to fix than you'll spend in extra tire costs. ...


2

If all you are doing is changing the boots (and not removing the tie rod ends), then no, it probably isn't essential to have the alignment done. However, alignment changes over time as various things wear and get damaged by the roads, potholes etc, so I'd get it done anyway. It is also worth making sure that the grit hasn't worked its way into the balljoint ...


2

If you think the alignment is off, take it back to the shop and have them double check it for you. They could have made a mistake ... it does and can happen. They should have given you an alignment report which would give you the before/after shot of what the alignment looked like. Make sure all of these numbers are in the green. If they didn't give you an ...


2

To answer your question, there aren't any alignment adjustments possible at the rear of the Honda Fit. Here is the reason why: This picture shows the front and rear suspension on your vehicle. It shows it to be made as a torsion suspension. At the front of the torsion bar are two pivot points which locates the suspension, then there is a spring and and ...


2

You can check the rear toe in exactly the same way you check the front toe -- using the same string setup, parallel to the car's centerline, measure the distance from the string to the leading and trailing edges of the wheel. One thing to be careful of is that the rear tread (a.k.a. track) may be different than the front. When you're lining up your string, ...


2

You may possibly have a bad tire or wheel, or a badly worn tie rod end or ball joint or suspension bushing, or a cracked suspension control arm, or a binding brake pad/shoe. Generally, alignment issues in the absence of worn or damaged parts will result in very consistent steering anomalies... with the exception of severe toe-in/toe-out issues, which may ...


1

You can do a wheel alignment the old school way, string and rulers, etc. But your situation needs to also include the inspecting bushings and any moving part connected to each wheel. The wear on your tire leads me to thinking it is a suspension or steering issue. Make sure you check your suspension and steering for loose components both with the suspension ...


1

From your post it appears that you in fact got the alignment you paid for. Whether you authorized it is a matter of semantics. In many cases the majority of the labor involved with doing an alignment is getting the vehicle on the alignment rack and taking the measurements. I have never heard of anyone checking the alignment for free unless they are just ...


1

Price sounds reasonable to me. Alignment definitely has an issue on that left rear corner. I can't tell across the Internet if it really needs shims, but it doesn't seem unreasonable. Many cars have very limited adjustments on the rear. They're not supposed to move much back there. Any change there is typically due to damage (hitting a curb or even a ...


1

From personal experience, under-inflated tires cause drifting to either side. So check your tires' air pressure first. To find proper tire pressure, and other details, this website may help Tire pressure. Otherwise, you need to take it back.


1

Yes, it is reasonable to take it back. If you find a problem with a vehicle after having work done it is only right to take it back to where the work was carried out. One good reason is that if an item has been missed on the work they will be the first to know whats gone wrong. Secondly, you have already paid for the work to be done, another repair shop ...


1

Found these specs here: http://www.fixya.com/cars/t14840019-toe_in_specs_2005_cobalt It is an 2005 so it might not be perfectly the same as a 2008, but the specs have 0.20 as correct with a tolerance of 0.20 either direction. That makes me think you are right on spec and do not need an alignment. KEY: ± = plus or minus; C/t = Cross Tolerances; Toe T= ...


1

Damaged tires (internal belts) or excessively worn tires are usually the main problem if your tires have been balanced properly and you have good rims. I had to replace the king pins on my 4x4 and set the alignment and replace the tires because of the uneven severe wear that was caused by the worn out king pins. The severe wear of the tires caused major ...


1

Just FYI: a worn wheel bearing will make an irritating high-pitched whining noise. If you ignore that, it will start making a horrible grinding noise, accompanied by a slight vibration on the steering wheel. If you don't hear anything, it's probably not the bearing. What you can do: 1. Check for bald spots on the front wheels. 2. Have your shocks tested. Or ...


1

The adjustment screws should be located either on the top of the headlamp assembly, behind the headlamp assembly, or near the frame rail by the radiator support. Once you have adjusted the bulb, see if the dark area goes away. It could be connected with the alignment.


1

Found an interesting thread at allsentra.com. Some choice bits from one of the posts: Many Nissan Sentra rear axles are mismanufactured with a huge toe in. Nissan actively discourages/forbids delearships to put in shims to correct the rear alignment. Specific Nissan Sentra calibrated shims can be obtained from rockauto or NAPA. Look under ...


1

I'm guessing it's mostly due to wear on various joints that control the exact angle of the suspension. Doesn't take much wear on a joint all the way at the end of an arm to cause a measurable angular change on the other end. Obviously a severe curb hit will cause bending to knock the alignment out too... I've found that, barring curb hits, it's not much ...


1

Yep, put it back to standard height ;) IIRC E36s are twin-wishbone IRS at the back, unless you've got a compact which runs E30 rear suspension. I can't remember if the wishbones themselves are adjustable, I have a feeling that the standard ones aren't and you'd have to get aftermarket ones instead*. Depending how it is mounted, you may well find that you ...


1

I would say that, as a general rule, if you touch any of the major suspension parts (Ball Joints, Tie Rod ends, CV Boot or shaft) you should probably get the car re aligned. Worse case scenario, you can put it all back together, drive on it for a week and re check your tire wear. If your alignment is out of whack, you will know.


1

With the tie rod end, I suppose I could see an issue if the new tie rod end wasn't threaded onto the rod at the same location as the old one... Just threading the tie-rod the same number of turns as the old one will not always mean you have the same alignment as when you started. For most cars, there are many different tie-rod manufactures that make a ...



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