Hot answers tagged

17

Issues involving steering wheel vibrations problems usually are most noticeable at one or two narrow speed ranges (5-10mph and 60-70mph), and will decrease significantly, and in some cases, even disappear outside of these ranges. The amount of vibration caused by worn tires will often be seen over a broader speed range if the tire is worn more. The severity ...


9

An alignment does not require removing the wheels. The equipment is attached to the wheels while they are in place. I often wondered about the shops that will do a free brake inspection but then charge $20 for tire rotation.


8

I'm living in a country where we need proper winter tires during that season so I have to switch between tires sets twice a year. Each switch I rotate the tires (rotation depends if the tires are direction or not) and mark the position on the one I remove for the next season to make sure to rotate them. Tire rotation is recommended (by Transport Canada and ...


8

One "at home" option is to use a manual wheel balancer like this model: These are normally used for people that want to balance their own trailer tires or for off-road vehicles, but in many cases you can do a good enough job to balance a car tire with one. Of course, once you pay $70-$90 USD for the device and buy a set of wheel weights and take the time ...


7

First of all, that is the job of the shop where you did the alignment, not just the wheels they should also check if the steering is aligned with the position of the wheel (they are entitled to do so). Solution: You can definitely take it to the station back and show them the problem; there is a good chance that the engineer might have forgotten to do ...


6

The only thing I see of any real concern here would be the left rear toe - it's off enough to possibly cause some tire wear. However, since it can't be adjusted, your best bet is to just rotate the tires regularly (every other oil change is a good rule of thumb) and keep an eye out for wear. You didn't say which Nissan you're driving, but I'm assuming it's ...


6

It is not normal for the front end to go out of alignment when getting the front rotors turned, but it would not be unheard of. Any time you mess with the front end of the vehicle you run the risk of needing an alignment. This is not something you should expect to be done, though. Something which may be happening is you may have a caliper which is dragging,...


6

When you say OBD i'm assuming you mean generic data. The answer is outright NO. OBD generic data has no parameters that the alignment can be gleamed from. If the car has a steering wheel angle sensor then maybe you could tell if something is wrong. This data would be available in manufacturer specific. If the angle has been off for a long time at high ...


6

Is it reasonable to expect that they should have noticed the torn LCA bushings and not done the alignment? It is reasonable to expect they should have noticed, but not unreasonable to realize everything will get noticed. I had my 72 Chevelle aligned once. The guy worked and worked on it trying to get the alignment right. Finally he kind of gave up and said ...


6

I'm afraid the only way to resolve this is to get matching width wheels plus matching sized tyres across the back axle. Even with the same sized tyres on different width wheels, the effective surface and sidewall profile shown to the road will be different. You may have success trying to find a second hand set of wheels cheaply or even buy an incomplete ...


5

You can get "in the ballpark" counting threads (if that's what you are referring to), but the computerized way is vastly more efficient. It can be done more precisely with levels, protractors, measuring tape, string, etc. If you buy a couple specialty tools (like a caster/camber gauge) it gets a little easier. HotRod.com has a decent article. In brief: ...


5

Unidirectional tires should NOT be cross rotated. "Uni" implies one, as in one direction (nothing to do with singing). Radials in general should not be cross rotated. They start behaving as you have discribed, with the noise and all. With all this said, I don't believe your tires are unidirectional, but again, once radials have been driven for a period of ...


5

Rear solid axles on trucks especially with leaf springs are not adjustable. To cause enough misalignment for one wheel to rub something must be damaged. I would start by looking at the center bolt of the leaf springs. The bolt ties all the leafs together in the center and is used as an alignment pin with the pad on the rear axle. Everything is held together ...


5

Negative camber contributes to stability. The more negative camber there is, within limits, the less a car will wander at high speed. The downside of too much negative camber is tire wear. In a production vehicle camber is usually between -0.75 to -3 degrees. Just enough to give stability on the highway without too much tire wear. Toe contribute the most ...


5

You can get an alignment at any time. It's often a good idea to get one when you get new tires, just so you don't mess them up if you have any alignment issues. However, you should also get one done if you have any kind of suspension work done (new shock absorbers, new tie rods, etc.) While you probably don't need to have one done if your tire wear is even, ...


5

I've even been told that you have to get the alignment done when the tires are new so they will allow the wheels to sit evenly and that worn tires will invalidate the alignment process since the wheels would then be "aligned" to the wear pattern. This is not true; the tire wear pattern has no affect on the measurements or adjustments. If the ...


4

Your link is actually for toe plates and not the bar. I think either work very well, but I am preferential to the plates like what you have shown. It comes with identical tape measures and for the price I don't think you can beat it. Same with the camber gauge ... it would fit the bill quite nicely. The only other thing you'd need are the hand tools to do ...


4

This may not be a perfect answer, but here's what I know... I am assuming this vehicle has a solid rear axle. There should be a panhard or track bar that connects the axle to the frame to keep it in alignment. The fault with this bar, is it moves the axle to one side when the suspension is compressed, and the other side when the suspension is not ...


4

Any time something in the suspension is replaced or something adjustable is undone an a alignment is recommended. While theoretically there are lots of little tricks to get the alignment close, it will never be perfect without verification with an alignment check. The biggest problem is that the replacement part is never exactly the same as the original ...


3

The vibration at speed is very unlikely to be the alignment. I would suggest getting your tires balanced. The most likely cause is that one is slightly out - perhaps a tire-weight fell off, or the wrong weight was put on last time you changed tires. - Bad alignment will eat your tyres faster than good alignment, but if all the shops you have been to say ...


3

The alignment goes out after a hit due to bending of components. There are three main things that are looked at during an alignment, and a couple of secondary measurements. I will only discuss the main three, which are camber, caster, and toe. The toe and camber are usually the ones that are adjusted when you get your alignment, as the caster is normally set ...


3

You basically have 3 measurements in the front, and 2 in the back that are normally adjustable unless you have a solid axle (You don't). The front caster is adjusted at the strut mount, the front/rear camber and toe normally utilize rods to adjust. The toe utilizes the tie rods in the front that are attached to your steering box, and the rear usually uses a ...


3

Your suspension is bent up and is a big mess. Goto a mechanic and get an estimate before it flies apart and injures you or innocent bystanders. I can see a wheel shaking, off camber and out of alignment while you drive down the road. This is not trivial. Imagine only one of your front brakes working well and you have to panic stop for a crosswalk filled ...


3

No, total toe is what matters, as long as your steering wheel is straight when you are riding down the road. Basically when those readings were taken the steering wheel may not have been pointing straight ahead. If the tech didn't still have the steering wheel locked down and the steering wheel turned slightly it would cause those readings. Another possible ...


3

It is necessary that you get your vehicle aligned when doing any of the following: Any suspension work which might involve geometry (ie: bushings, ball joints, steering linkage, rack & pinion, etc.) Strut replacement Change of rims to different sizes (ie: non-standard, wider, taller, etc.) If the vehicle is pulling (see NOTE #1 below) to one side or ...


3

You will have to replace one or both wheels to make sure you have matching sizes on both sides. Note that in many jurisdictions having non-matching tyres on an axle will fail safety/roadworthyness inspections (or side-of-the-road checks)


3

Short answer. Yes. Your vehicle could be pulling to the right for several reasons. It could be uneven tire wear (which would likely have been caused by an alignment issue), tire pressure (which you've checked), wheel damage (which you've checked) or misalignment. One thing you might try before going for an alignment is making sure that all four of your ...


3

Yes, tire squealing under high brake loads is usually worn out tires, but may also have something to do with the tire compound, tire inflation and road temperature.


3

You would want to use a dial indicator and a pair of vblocks In order to understand the amount of run-out you may have on your axle you will want to be able to measure the amount of run-out and you have on the axle. You could roll it back and forth on a flat surface to get a general idea if the axle is bent but ultimately, to fully understand the issue ...


2

With respect to your original question: What is a damper? A damper (AKA strut or shock absorber) is "a mechanical device designed to dissipate kinetic energy." In it's automotive use, it works with the springs to absorb the impact of bumps and rough spots in the road before those impacts bother your car and the passengers therein. In answering a ...



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