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5

The oil stuff is more than likely caused from what the intake pulls out of the crank case through the PCV. If you can get a hold of a couple cans of Seafoam, this should take care of the residue about as easy as you can do it without taking the engine apart. Use the rubber hose to the right of the photo to introduce it into your system. As an engine gets ...


4

tl;dr: your car will be more vulnerable to hydrolock. Don't use full throttle in deep puddles. In the rain, you should be fine in most situations. All that said, you'll still be able to ruin your car if you try hard enough. If you submerge a running car in water, it's going to damage the engine, cold-air intake or not. One of the worst possible ...


4

It sounds as though you did suck up some water and were on the verge of hydrolock, but didn't quite get there. I also doubt you have caused any damage to the engine, in fact, you may have inadvertently helped your engine (though I wouldn't suggest you do this again!!!). The extra sputtering may have been a case of the filter on your CAI getting soaked with ...


3

A quick search appears to indicate that this is a common issue on this particular model of Civic. The bolt does not want to come out all the way because the heat from the engine over time has liberated the plastic female housing that it threads into. To remove it you need to figure out a way to keep the plastic from spinning when the bolt is turned, as per ...


3

It doesn't sound like a fuel line problem ( though there's a small small chance it's a fuel pump ), it sounds like your engine isn't getting enough air on one end or the other. It might be a dirty air filter, or it might be a clogged cat or bad O2 sensor. Sometimes it's easy to tell if the cat is clogged, it will get extra hot and turn red and that's your ...


2

Typically it's to catch the blow-by. While the PCV system is designed to vent just air/fumes as Nick C mentions, as an engine wears it'll start to blow some liquid oil past. That's normally redirected to the intake so it'll burn off (as oppposed to just dripping it on the ground like the old cars used to). Car enthusiasts like to install catch cans (that ...


2

Most, if not all, internal combustion engines have a breather on the crank case, to allow fumes to escape from the oil pan. In a lot of cars (presumably including the RX-8), this is vented into the inlet manifold to prevent the fumes being released into the atmosphere. Installing a catch can in this breather can prevent atomised oil evaporating up the ...


2

Is the car running when you try to "get it stuck again by hand"? If not, remember that when the car is running with the throttle closed, there is vacuum being pulled against the throttle butteryfly by the running engine. Perhaps there's some play in the pivot or the assembly that allows the intake vacuum to pull the butterfly into a position where it ...


2

Try hydro shields. Other are nylon covers for your intake filters made by injen. It fixed the problem on my Audi tt


2

Two things come to mind here: First, cars are a sieve. There are more holes in them than you can shake a stick at. Lizards are very pliable creatures and can fit through any of these small openings if it fits their needs. Second, the lizard may have been in your car since the last time you were in your car. You never know.


1

It looks like that piece is before the carb on that bike. It acts as a resonator, helping to damping out noises from the intake without adding restriction. Plenty of cars have the same thing in the intake. Some cars have a similar device in the exhaust after the muffler. It is often just a short piece of pipe welded into the main exhaust pipe.


1

The P0507 code refers to: A P0507 DTC trouble code may be caused by one or more of the following: A vacuum leak Leaking air intake after the throttle body EGR valve leaking vacuum A faulty positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) valve Damaged/failed/dirty throttle body Failed EVAP system Failed IAC (idle air controller) or faulty IAC circuit Things to ...


1

Since the car started fine after the first try, there should be nothing to worry about. The thing to remember is: different car; different situation. If it continued not to want to start, then you'd have an issue.


1

HAHA! I had this EXACT problem happen on one of my motorbikes. Basically the velocity of the wind hits a perfect speed over either a crack in the intake pipe, or some other object, and it whistles. I'm not really sure why you would bother with cold air intakes. At best they only really provide the same level of gains as a better air filter. There are ...


1

For this type of intake manifold gasket, if there is absolutely no damage to the rubber it should be good for reuse. You will need to be very careful with it when taking it off of the engine. Make sure you clean it up and put a very light coat of clean oil on it before installation. Do not remove it from the intake manifold to do this, though, as you run the ...


1

Turns out it was the water pump. Jim at Watson Automotive in Thetford VT replaced it ($400) and it's not stalled or flooded since. In the question I left out one clue that Jim used — a belt was squeaking. He found that was from a leak of radiator fluid from the water pump. Jim theorizes that low coolant caused portions of the engine to get too ...


1

I wish I had a clue or had watched this video before I spent over $600 way back in 2003 when my MAF went bad in my 2000 Sentra. The video should speak for itself: http://youtu.be/vPT8rL0noYg



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