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7

Are you talking about the in-cabin air filter, or the engine air filter? In either case, the answer is no. I mean you can do it, but the filter will not work like it is supposed to afterwards. The reason for this is they are made of paper. When you get them wet like you are suggesting, it destroys the element. As to the why you have to change them, once ...


6

You want to be getting as much cold air as possible, as colder air is denser and thus gives your engine more oxygen for a given volume (and thus more power/better efficiency) - that's why the filter in the picture is surrounded be shields, to prevent it drawing in warm air from the engine bay - I'd assume that area in front that filter is open to atmosphere ...


6

Normally the idea is to get more air into the engine using a less restrictive air filter. As an engine is basically an air pump, getting more oxygen and more fuel into the engine usually equals a bigger bang and thus hopefully more power. That said, in order to get a meaningful improvement using a performance air filter, the main restriction needs to be the ...


6

If it was just a normal paper filter it is fine. If it is a re-usable washable filter then then I would suggest a wash and oiling procedure according to the manufacturer instructions.


6

I've never experienced performance drops with good renewable filters. Most engines perform slightly better with a good filter in especially the low and high RPM ranges. A bad/cheap filter is not a good choice, some have too much oil (to catch the dust) and this clogs up the AFM until eventually your "check engine" warning light turns on. A cold/open air ...


5

Since its paper based, your ability to clean it is somewhat limited. Mechanically agitating it (i.e. with a brush) is iffy since you run the risk of damaging the filter element. You can try shooting compressed air from the opposite direction of the filter but that really only removes the larger chunks of dirt, and if you're not careful, can also damage the ...


5

Other possible sources: Vacuum Leak Other Ignition item (Plug Wires, Distributer, etc.) Really poor fuel Air Filter Blocked Exhaust Blockage I would start with the spark plugs. Take them out and see if they can give any indication as to the true problem. See this answer for more info (While you have them out, replace them if you need to). Then start ...


5

On my most recent car before my current car, I put in a K&N air filter. I believe I saw a minor improvement in horsepower, but it could also have been the placebo effect. As to your questions: You can save money with a K&N as long as the following are true: You clean/oil the filter at the recommended intervals You don't live in an excessively ...


4

Unless you're going to spend a lot of money on a cleanable K&N type filter, I'm not aware of any real benefits to upgraded air filters - it's basically a folded sheet of cardboard after all... What is worth it, however, is getting a better quality oil filter. Many cheaper oil filters miss out the anti-drain-down valve that is commonly found on OEM ...


4

If driving with multiple filters, your vehicle will lose performance. Your car will have a greater restriction in the intake system from having to pass through two separate elements. You would, however, have cleaner air coming into the system, but at a cost of the performance. You'll have to have more gas pedal to compensate which would cause other issues as ...


4

If you use more than one air filter, you will make it harder for the engine to suck air into the intake manifold, meaning you will lose power. Less restrictive filters will give you more performance, but will allow more dirt into the engine. If you use something like a cone filter (like in the second picture), you will have a change in sound, especially ...


4

The exact answer to this is - It Depends... The reason for this is that your existing ECU, whether it be on a bike or in a car, has a range of inputs and a range out outputs, and a mapping between them. As long as your inputs are within the ranges expected, it may well be able to cope with the changed architecture, however there are two common problems: ...


3

Jetting a carburator - short answer You will require two things, probably. A size larger mainjet An adjustable needle jet Your main jet sits in the floatbowl, it's number 11. Off idle and higher the main jet contributes more and more to air fuel mixture as you open the throttle to wide open where the main jet is 99% of your fuel delivery. The ...


3

Iwould say yes but only from the ecological point of view.Eliminating the solvents needed to clean the filter and the ease of replacement would be two strong points.


3

I agree with NoCarrier, you really have to tackle the source of the problem, which is ability to get a new filter. I'm iffy about recommending eBay, but this guy has a stellar rating, and seems to specialize in motorcycles. He has a listing for this filter with a quantity of 10+. Communicate with him and to see if this will work out for you, and consider ...


3

A quick search appears to indicate that this is a common issue on this particular model of Civic. The bolt does not want to come out all the way because the heat from the engine over time has liberated the plastic female housing that it threads into. To remove it you need to figure out a way to keep the plastic from spinning when the bolt is turned, as per ...


2

I have a Yamaha SZR bike, 4 year & I use to change it every 8000 KM. It has orange paper air filter. I use a method to clean air filter every 1500 KM & it really works if you do it carefully. It takes time. Put the air-filter for 3-4 hour in detergent solution in a bucket & you can see a huge amount of dirt & dust in the bottom of bucket. ...


2

Hold it up towards the sun .If you canot see the light shine through, replace it


2

I used to change mine at the factory recommended change interval (severe service, since my car sees lots of dirt roads). I believe that was 15k miles. It was always pretty dirty looking when removed, but no differences in performance or MPG noted due to replacement. Upsides to more frequent changes: - Cleaner air should mean more MPG and performance - Do ...


2

I usually change mine as part of any service, so generally twice a year. Obviously this will depend on how much you use the car and what sort of environment you're in - if you drive it a lot in dusty conditions you may well need to do it more often. As Gabriel says, its a cheap thing to replace, and a clogged filter will adversely affect your power and ...


2

I spent several weeks researching this issue not that many years ago. I read all sorts of claims and "proof" that a $50 air filter will improve your vehicle's acceleration, horsepower, torque, longevity, etc. There would always be something about the "proof" that seemed questionable. Then I read a most insightful comment. The insightful author pointed ...


2

Air filters are one of those things that can have real measurable effects. However, the measurements are often more hassle than normal people are willing to tolerate. tl;dr: I don't think you'd be able to detect a change in performance on a Prius. I recommend that you don't bother. Air filters have measurable properties that can be broadly lumped into: ...


2

You definitely should try and find a new filter and because the filter is paper based your options are limited cleaning wise. If you own an air compressor, try limiting the amount of air coming out to the closest lowest setting and blow air gently into the filter which might help clean it slightly, but eventually you won't be able to clean it properly any ...


2

There is no need to reprogram the ECU This is for a couple of reasons: The engine barely feels a difference Contrary to what the name implies, a "free-flowing" intake impacts the pressure at the valve inlet and not the volume of fresh inlet air per cycle. Here are the numbers to back it up: K&N provide detailed test data for the Yamaha R15, which ...


1

The last vehicle in the USA to use a carb was the Susuki Jimmy in 1993. Your air filter element is bonded together with petro-chemical adhesives, and a lot of filters have a petro-chemical treatment to enhance thier performance. Soaking the filter in petrol can only be detrimental to the filter. Your best bet is to change the filter to avoid any possibility ...


1

You need to contact the service station. I am using Access from last 1 year and facing no dificulties.


1

If cost is the issue, there may be cheaper ways to purchase an OEM air filter (eg online). However, personally I would consider even a $40 filter a cheap investment, considering it is protecting the engine from an expensive rebuild. You may be interested to read the following research about the reduced filtration provided by washable-type filters: - ...


1

Typically the main difference between a 'normal' stock filter over a high performance one is airflow. They are designed to retain the filtering capability, but have superior airflow (design, materials, shape of filter internals etc) to allow more oxygen to the engine, which means you can get superior burn and greater output power. So pros: Greater ...


1

Well, he's kind of right. You will get about 1BHP more from a good quality filter. But unless you're the princess who slept on the pea, you won't notice. What better quality filters DO have going for them is that they take longer to clog up. So they don't really GIVE you more power, they're better at PREVENTING power loss once you've driven a couple thousand ...


1

It depends if you're talking a drop in filter or a cone filter. In many cases, a cone filter which replaces the airbox can suck in warm air - decreasing performance. Some cone filter designs come with their own airbox/heat shielding, or are relocated to someplace else where it sucks in cold air. A drop in filter should not lose power per se, but make a few ...



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