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11

The problem is you are over taxing the power strip. You need to power your compressor directly from the wall socket, or on an extension cord which can handle 15A or more (12 gauge or better below 50' length). Your compressor is rated at 14A, which usually means running Amps. When it first starts it will draw more amperage. When the tank is empty, it draws ...


6

The power of your compressor is given by P = V x I = 12 x 30 = 360 W. This sounds about right. It sounds as though your compressor is badly made and that the pressure switch is not adequate for the job. You could try to modify like this. Figure 1. Relay control of compressor motor. Rewire the unit as shown. Use a 12 V relay rated for > 40 A. Your ...


3

No, you didn't break the laws of physics. In fact, you confirmed them. If you "refilled" the refrigerant in the system from cans without pulling a very strong vacuum, you still have regular air in the system, and it will not cool. You are also subjecting the internal components to moisture, and that's bad. AC refrigeration emptying and refilling is not a ...


3

If the "gauge gets back to zero" at any time, on either the low or high side, you have a leak. Perhaps a very large one. The gauge should never read zero, unless ALL the refrgerant has leaked out. When you discharged the high side, are you certain the schrader valve core in the port re-seated? Or that debris hasn't ended up under the conical seal, ...


2

You can confirm that the air-conditioning system is working by using a pressure gauge to verify that both low-side and high-side pressures are in the expected range of operation (while the A/C is running and compressor clutch is engaged). The 2005 Legacy service manual says that a fully charged system should be 400 ± 30 g (0.88 ± 0.07 lb). The manual also ...



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