Hot answers tagged

33

Yes. One of your brake pads on the caliper side of the brakes had been worn so far down it popped out of place. Now you are stopping using the caliper piston against the brake rotor. You will now have to not only get the brake pads and rotors replaced, but the caliper as well. If you cannot fix this yourself, you should get the vehicle towed to a repair shop....


17

Use the jumper battery to start the engine, then disconnect it and leave the engine running (with no current drain such as lights, heater fan, radio, etc). The car should charge its own battery to 80% charge in about two hours (assuming the battery and alternator are in good condition; the battery may be damaged by being uncharged for so long, but I've never ...


12

Lead acid type batteries, such as this, like to be charged very slowly. Under 5 amps for many hours would be best. During fast charging the internals overheat and electrolyte can boil. Best to charge slowly if time allows. This type battery has its worst damage happen when it is stored discharged. The chemistry in this state is more acidic. This acid ...


11

It sounds like the brake pads have either completely worn through or otherwise failed, your car is not safe to drive at all. In this case you will certainly need new pads on both sides and possibly new rotors (disks) if they have been scored by metal/metal contact. Depending on exactly what has failed the calipers and pistons may be ok but they need to ...


10

From personal experience, I'd replaced ALOT of these working at the dealership. It wasn't just the accords either, it was quite a few Honda and Acuras that used the same design and power delivery system. The most common issues I saw out of probably close to 100+ failures of these was: Ground strap on the starter becoming corroded. Bad ground to engine ...


9

I had this same issue. The PCM and fuel pressure regulator is the correct fix. It is not cheap, but it does address the problem. If i recall, the issue has to do with ethanol having a lower boiling point than traditional gas. This causes it to vaporize on the fuel rail when the car's warm, but no long pumping gas because it's off. When you go to re-start ...


9

I suspect that the 15% oil is talking about oil life. Just make sure that you check the oil level and top it off appropriately before taking the trip. Change the oil a quickly as possible once the trip is done.


9

A @FredWilson says, you need to charge it slowly - either by driving it around or by using a trickle charger. If you can get a trickle charger with a 'maintenance mode', you can leave it permanently attached to the car and it will keep the battery topped up and stop it going flat in the first place. If possible, I'd also recommend finding someone you trust ...


8

Figured out it (thanks to a shove in the right direction by @mikes): It's the remote engine start accessory's antenna. I didn't think of it when I was asked if I had "add-ons" because it's an official Honda accessory (that I can't do without!) installed by the dealer before taking delivery. Specifically, see this exploded diagram part #4: I went back ...


7

Distributor, it's what provides the electrical energy to the spark plugs at the correct time.


7

If the screw was just screwed into fibreglass, then a simple fibreglass patch is all you need. Cover the hole, and then once it has set, drill a pilot hole and fit the new screw. Alternatively you could use a couple of washers and a bolt, rather than a screw. Because this is not a high load, and is hidden in normal use, you don't need anything that clever ...


7

More than likely the bulbs have gone out (died) which services the needles which has gone dark. To replace these you'll need to dismantle the dash, which really isn't too hard (procedure found in this video). When you get the speedo cluster out, find the white plastic backing and remove it. Underneath of it, you should find the bulbs which need to be ...


6

You might be interested in this question: What are the audible symptoms of a failing starter motor? The diagnosis in that question and answer period was that I probably had an aging starter motor (correct).


6

If the light was shut off after pumping the foot brakes the issue was not the parking brake. The problem is in the regular braking system you use to stop the car, as such it needs immediate attention. It may have been caused by something as simple as low brake fluid level. If the level is low either the system has a leak or the brake pads are worn to the ...


6

The caliper should be fine once the brake line issue is repaired providing it didn't get hot enough to melt the seals. The pads may appear fine but I would replace them. Pads that got that hot mays have hairline cracks in them. The cracks could eventually cause pieces of the lining to flake off. The rotor is likely in need of replacement also. As far as ...


6

You need Spark, Fuel, and Compression for an engine to run. Since this engine was just reassembled, there is a lot to question. Spark - rotor position - beware of caps where the points are not "straight through" plug wires in the correct position timing - may need play with it a bit coil - ensure it is firing spark plug firing - use a jumper to connect ...


6

You need to check for leaks in the air intake A leaky air intake can explain hunting idle and I don't think spraying carb cleaner is always conclusive as some cracks can be really hard to see/detect. There are several ways to check this: block the air intake completely The easiest way to do this is disconnect the airbox and cover the piping before the ...


6

It sounds like the parking brake is siezed on, hence no resistance when pulling the lever. It looks like these cars use the same calliper to apply both the foot brake and the parking brake. A common fault with these designs is that the lever on the calliper that the parking brake cable connects to siezes and so the brake doesn't release. It is sometimes ...


6

From underneath the car, you may be able to get access to the starter motor. It is then possible to connect jump leads from a charged battery to the car by connecting the positive lead to the the large connector on the starter motor and the negative lead to a suitable place on the engine. Once you have power, you may be able to open the car as usual.


6

Spark? looks good enough to me. Jumps a 30kV gap looks blue enough to rule out a secondary issue. Great. MAP sensor voltage looks OK < .90v with the engine hot @ idle. Pretty much rules out a sticking valve or the valves being out of adjustment. Concur, and just about rules out engine pumping problems. That and the good compression test. ...


6

When you get a bunch of codes on a car, the best way to work through is to fix only the first code - in this case the P2195. The easiest check is to look for a disconnected cable - Rear A/F Sensor Sensor 1 Bank 1 (which is also a cause of P1172). If everything checks out good, the other cause of a P2195 points towards the MAF having some debris in it. From ...


6

High Pressure Air I would disconnect the hose from that sprayer from the motor that gives it the pressure to spray. I would go where there is high pressure air. In my case that would be my shop. I would have an air gun with a rubber tip. I would take that air gun with a rubber tip and push it tightly against the sprayer nozzle and use the high pressure ...


5

Some cars have a separate flasher relay for the Hazards - if that's the case then you might have a failure of the primary flasher relay? The signal initially not turning off suggests a possible failure of the switch though - It might be worth disconnecting the switch (there's usually a connection somewhere under the column) and testing it separately? I'm ...


5

I think it is most likely the wires, rotor cap, and/or coil. When the aforementioned parts get old and tired, then damp with increased humidity, they can leak electricity. This is most easily seen at night, because there will be a nice bright light show under the hood. If it doesn't happen to be raining and the car starts right up, you can test the theory ...


5

The oil pan is not a normal wear item, however being so low to the ground it is possible to damage it. As the oil pan is not removed for regular inspection, any decision made by the mechanic should be visible to photograph without tools or disassembly, either as physical damage or oil leaking. Have the mechanic put the vehicle on the lift and show to you ...


5

All cars have a tire information sticker somewhere in the driver door jam. The sticker will list the tire size and speed rating. The exact brand is not important and can't be easily traced either. I worked at a dealership for a few years and it was not uncommon for a single model of cars to come with three different tires on it. Choose the tire based on the ...


5

Turns out this particular issue wasn't due to me running the car out of battery (I believe) but actually to a blown fuse. I guess I had previously left the OBD II plugged in for awhile and apparently if anything else "on that circuit" is turned on it can blow the fuse, and my kids may have turned something on and voila, fuse blown. Another effect of having ...


5

They are typically on the same fuse. Charging outlet should be listed as a cigarette lighter.


5

Not difficult really, if you're handy with a screw driver. Hondas are usually pretty easy to pull the dash apart on, and this guide will help you with that. Then, it's just a case of installing your new stereo. Most "good" brands (like Alpine and so forth) will have adaptor plugs that can make it easy to go from your cars original stereo plug to the new ...


4

So the problem seems to go away if manage to get the car into gear and move, but not if you rev it? "fuel ressure regulator and PCM!?" Sounds like they haven't bothered with the slightest bit of diagnosis. It sounds like a fuel pump problem to me. An electrical fuel pump problem at that. I think you have a mechanical fuel regulator, so i wouldn't expect it ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible