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5

On the 97 Sonoma the controls are electronic and send a signal to a vacuum switch block which will send vacuum to various valves. This is from a corvette but is similar. While the switches on the control panel can fail more commonly the vacuum lines, check valve or vacuum reservoir will fail first. Locate the vacuum source line and measure engine ...


1

The values seem awfully high on the low side. The high side is the output of the compressor to the condenser coil where the refrigerant is in liquid form. The low side pressures should be about a third of the high value. The low side is the line to the evaporator coil (inside the vehicle) which is vapor form. When the system is being charged it is from the ...


3

Heck yeah! Short answer: Replace the check valve. Long answer: There is a check valve between the vacuum reservoir and the rest of the system. What that does is help the vacuum reservoir hold more vacuum. Your engine won't have enough vacuum "force" to move the heating ventilation doors without the reservoir. The check valve is that little black and ...


0

with the car running, use an aerosol can of carb cleaner with the straw in it to spray around the vacuum lines and fittings. When you get to the leak point you will hear the rpm change. move slowly and use spurts.


2

I've been an auto technician for 28 years. I am factory trained by several manufactures and am ASE certified and I own my own auto repair business. My professional advise is this: Your automotive air conditioning system is a sealed system just like your homes refrigerator.It should only be repaired if it malfunctions.Just I tell my own wonderful customers, ...


9

Cabin filters on modern cars use something called activated carbon (or at least some of them do) which is basically two paper / cotton sheets either side of a fine layer of carbon particles. It looks to me as though your cabin filter has a hole in it and therefore is blowing carbon all over the inside of the cabin. I'd take it back to wherever installed ...


2

There is NO free lunch, you will need many batteries and a much better alternator. You could in fact attach a window mounted air conditioner like @Spehro Pefhany suggests. OR TEC Thermo Electric Cooling There are peltier elements that also generate a cooling effect compressor free. They are essentially a plate of ceramic postively charged, and one ...


6

Yes, this is possible. Several companies (VAG, BMW) have switched to AC units that are driven by electric motors. For BMW, this is part of their Efficient Dynamics strategy, where they'll switch the compressor on/off depending on engine load to optimize fuel consumption. When the weather's not too hot, you can run the compressor intermittently without the ...


9

Well, Teslas (and presumably other all-electric cars) have A/C so it's not impossible, but A/C takes a fair amount of power. On the other hand, Teslas store a lot of energy. The A/C is something like 2.4kW which is about 8,000 BTU/h or about 3HP. So using an electric motor on a conventional car might give you a few more HP briefly, but the alternator has ...


8

The short answer to your question is no. As @JPhi1618 noted, the compressor is mechanically driven. Without the compressor you don't have any cooling. The AC runs by changing the state and pressure of a liquid, and compressing the liquid is a big part of that cycle. If you bolted an electric compressor onto the car you would have to find a way to switch ...


12

I can't give you numbers or calculations without some work, but I can tell you than energy is never free. Cars have an A/C compressor that is mechanically driven by the engine because this is the easiest way to get the job done in a typical consumer car. An A/C compressor actually takes a huge amount of energy to operate. In fact a central A/C unit for a ...


2

A few things in addition to Paulster's answer If you want to completely remove the A/C compressor, go to a shop first and have them drain the refrigerant. Do not let it vent into the atmosphere. Even if the system is not working, there is likely a little bit left. You do not need to remove the compressor, leaving it will not hurt anything. Depending on ...


3

If you don't need the A/C, just leave everything where it's at. You may want to fix it in the future, so if everything is there, all you have to do is fix what's wrong and there you are. The pulley will spin freely, so no big deal there. If the refrigerant is all out of the system, it won't attempt to turn on. It's just a little bit of unused weight in the ...


4

You have mold in the A/C system. To fix it, do the following; Remove the cabin air filters. Buy new ones - they're pretty cheap. Even if you don't want to buy new ones, however, still remove them. Open all the car windows. Turn the engine on, and put your A/C on at full speed, with fresh air selected (not recirculation) Get a can of Lysol or Ozium. Spray ...


3

The air conditioner on this vehicle uses a vacuum powered HVAC controls. A leak anywhere in the vacuum system can cause this symptom. One way to test for leaks is to apply low pressure air (10psi) into the system and listen for leaks. Leaks at the vacuum reservoir are common. So is the line to the air recirculation valve because it is close to the passengers ...


4

I don't know about this car specifically but I've had a whole lot of time working as an air conditioning (AC) engineer at a Detroit based Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) The body control module (BCM) provides an interface for relays in the system, generally for things inside the passenger compartment of the vehicle. The Engine Control Module (ECM) ...


3

Those OBD-II PIDS are NOT part of the standard OBD-II spec - they are manufacturer specific and not governed under OBD-II That being said, I know for a fact that you can get this data if your car is a Daihatsu Copen as I have done it



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