New answers tagged

1

No, you didn't break the laws of physics. In fact, you confirmed them. If you "refilled" the refrigerant in the system from cans without pulling a very strong vacuum, you still have regular air in the system, and it will not cool. You are also subjecting the internal components to moisture, and that's bad. AC refrigeration emptying and refilling is not a ...


1

If the "gauge gets back to zero" at any time, on either the low or high side, you have a leak. Perhaps a very large one. The gauge should never read zero, unless ALL the refrgerant has leaked out. When you discharged the high side, are you certain the schrader valve core in the port re-seated? Or that debris hasn't ended up under the conical seal, ...


2

Depends on what you consider easy. It's possible to fill your system and then spray the entire ac system down with soapy water to watch for air bubbles escaping from the lines, but this is a tedious task. There are cans of refrigerant with uv dye placed in them also, so what you can do is fill your system with one of the uv dye cans and then drive around for ...


3

A few corrections. (1) moisture in the system does NOT cause the suction line to frost up on the outside. Quite the opposite. Moisture in the system will freeze at the orifice tube or Tx valve and block the flow of refrigerant. No refrigerant flow, no cooling. But that will let the ice inside the orifice/valve melt, and it will cool again, then freeze ...


2

My 2008 Civic developed same symptoms. I am pretty certain it is the compressor clutch. I examined the compressor and noticed that the clutch on the front was rusty. Not scaley but brown. I downed the clutch assembly with WD 40. Worked. Maybe a short term fix but I'm not hot for the time being. If you try this don't spray on the belt nor the alternator fan.


0

The fact that the clutch engages as it should, does not mean your compressor is working properly. All the clutch does is apply torque from the belt to the shaft of the compressor. For the compressor to work the rest of it must be functioning and actually increasing the pressure of the refrigerant. Speaking of which, Freon is R12, which has been illegal to ...


1

A simple solution You can achieve similar results by opening all doors for about ~1 minute before entering your car. All hot air inside the car will be replaced with probably still warm air from the outside. If there's no wind, you can turn on the ventilation addtionally. One minute of ventilation usually won't hurt the car battery too much. Plus, it get's ...


1

The AC system is separated into two halves, High side and Low side. When the engine is running and the AC compressor is engaged, the compressor pulls refrigerant (not Freon) from the low side and pushes it into the high side. On the other side, the system is separated into high side and low side by either the orifice tube or thermal expansion valve (TXV) ...


1

I already commented on an answer to your other question: http://mechanics.stackexchange.com/a/31965/6794 The bottomline is: There's no sense in trying to compare A/C systems in different vehicle types. If a workshop is out for a quick buck, they will happily evacuate and refill your A/C refrigerant, whether it's needed or not. (I regularly hear the sales ...


3

Apart from the limited amount of power obtainable from a panel being less than that required to operate anything more than a fan, there are perhaps two other reasons Current solar panels are flat and rigid. Fitting one into the roof of a car may spoil its styling, or its aerodynamics, or both. By adding a panel you are increasing the weight of the car, ...


3

The Lancia Thesis, introduced back in 2001, had this system. Basically the glass in the sunroof was actually a solar panel which was used to power the A/C fan when the car was parked in direct sunlight. The more intense the sunshine, the more power for the fans, the cooler the cabin would become. This system was one of a number of things on the Lancia ...


7

You have a great idea! And it IS being done. Certain models of the Toyota Prius feature an optional solar roof that powers interior fans that automatically engage when the interior gets too warm. The hybrid batteries are not even used at all: the fans run strictly on solar power! Cool (literally). Image Source: resilience.org


3

The problem you have is efficiency. Solar panel efficiency runs about 10-20%, depending on the type used. Air conditioners range in efficiency, about 30% efficiency is a good working figure. What this means is that it takes 3.3 times the energy to cool your car for every unit of heat you remove. Solar panel efficiency means you need about 6.6 times the ...


11

If you would like to do that by the use of solar panels, the problem is power. A typical car AC probably uses somewhere between 1000 and 3000 watts. A square meter of typical photovoltaic cells generates roughly 150W of power. Even if you covered the entire car with solar panels, they wouldn't be sufficient to power the AC completely under perfect ...


36

Welcome to the wonderful and wacky world of thermodynamics. A volume of air has heat. For example a gallon of air needs a certain amount of cooling to drop from 87 degrees to 42 degrees. An AC evaporator can absorb heat at a constant maximum rate. When the blower is on low and lets say flowing one gallon of air a second, the evaporator is able to drop ...


6

Yes there is oil in the system to keep the compressor lubricated. It is carried throughout the system in the refrigerant. It is usually added in when the system is charged.


2

Two areas of concern: 1). It's possible you've got too much refrigerant in there and it's messing up the pressure bad. What makes me think that is the ten minute delay. I believe that as air passes through the condenser the refrigant cools down and the pressure reduces enough to allow clutch engagement. The only way to know for sure is to conduct a ...


3

From your description, its the front seal of the Air Conditioning (AC) compressor that is leaking. And its not really clear on what causes that to leak, except excess shaft / internal bearing wear. With that said, you could evacuate the system, pull the compressor, remove the A/C clutch, remove the seal and re-install a new one, but my guess it would be ...


7

Set these test conditions: Engine set to 1800 rpm Recirulation air direction on Fan speed on low Windows up Temp set to max cold Air outlet to dash vents Vehicle in the shade Run for at least ten minutes, longer on a hot day. It can take much longer on in hot weather or if the vehicle is parked in the sun. Measure at least 3 inches into the center dash ...


1

The A/C compressor has a clutch that engages when the A/C needs to run. It could be that the clutch/compressor is bad. You can verify this by looking at the end of the A/C compressor: within the pully wheel there is a disc that moves independently of the pully. I believe it should rotate most of the time when the system is cooling.


1

could be the high pressure sensor of your a/c when turned on the pressure in your a/c system builds up towards a couple of bar and then the sensor kicks in, because the pressure is too high. is your airco fan spinning? when stationary the fan should be starting after a minute or so. had the same problem on my golf mk4


4

The squirrel cage has broken fin(s), or the motor bearing has gone (most likely on a '99), or the case has distorted -- all of which allow the unit to vibrate or slightly rub on a part of the case. If you remove the glovebox and plastic the kick panel underneath it, you can press various places on the housing and case to see if the noise changes... if it ...


5

I checked ALLDATA. The A/C switch grounds the AC SELECT input at the Powertarain Control Module (PCM). The high (normally closed) and low (normally open) pressure switches in series (may be the same housing) ground the AC REQUEST input at the PCM. With those two inputs, the PCM sinks the AC RELAY output. This should engage the AC compressor clutch. I ...


2

I found the problem. Apparently it was a long piece of paper carried into fan assembly by a mouse. After running for a while paper must be choking the fan and thus stopping the air flow. Thanks everybody.


2

I don't know the devices used for this job, but due to the negative sign, the pressure seems to be relative, i.e. difference to ambient pressure. (When the device is disconnected and doesn't run, the gauge should show a pressure of zero, too) The absolute air pressure at altitude is shown in this plot: (Sorry for the odd values, but I'm used to SI units.....


0

Probably a small leak at a hose fitting or something similar. I think the easiest way to check would be to fill with nitrogen and check for leaks with soapy water sprayed on all joints and connections.


0

That's a classic Ford problem. I doubt it's an object, but perhaps dirt, leaves, or deteriorating foam surround door seals. Try and twist the fluted knob with the actuator off. If the blend door resists, you are going to have to isolate the restriction in travel. People have soaked the area with WD-40 or similar with some success, but I don't recommend ...


1

It sounds like normal operation of the compressor for the a/c. It is run by a belt from the engine. It is normal for it to cycle on and off while the a/c is on or while the defrost is on. As long as it doesn't sound harsh or like it is switching off and on very frequently (every 3-5 seconds), then it is probably ok.


0

I think that it would be best to replace it, they are not expensive for aftermarket parts. A good used one would be better than patching it. For best results, you will need to pull a good vacuum on the system to eliminate any air or moisture in the system before charging. It would be best to have it done professionally to minimize release of refrigerant ...


1

If there is a seperate fuse or relay for the compressor, then you could remove either. There should be an electrical connector near the compressor that could be unplugged, or you could cut the belt if there is nothing else driven by that belt.



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