Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

While the HVAC system paths will vary greatly between cars, try these first: If the items are metal or contain metal, use an extendable magnet to reach straight in, or if it is further in then use a magnet tied to a string or dental floss. You can use a long hook (used in dentistry) to reach in and hopefully loop the item, or again attach it to a ...


2

An air conditioning system is separated into two sides, high pressure side and low pressure side. There are service fittings on each side. If you think of the AC system as a hula hoop, the system is separated on one side by the compressor and on the other by the expansion valve. The high side has the condenser and the low side has the evaporator (the cold ...


1

The A/C system has a pressure sensor built in, so the A/C compressor wont run without refrigerant in the system. Therefore there is no problem driving the car.


1

Sounds like a decent plan of attack. The post-work actions should really be: leak test evacuate the system recharge with refrigerant


3

It depends on the vehicle, why it is being left, and how it is prepared before being left. If it's a vehicle that's in reasonably regular use, then I'd recommend making sure it's used at least once every week or so, and is driven far enough for the engine to get up to full operating temperature. Just starting it and letting it run is better than nothing ...


2

According to the 2000 CR-V service manual, under the pressure-test conditions (86 °C, 70 % RH): the low-side pressure should be around 43 psi (compared to 32 psi) the high-side pressure should be around 320 psi (compared to 150 psi) Possible scenarios It seems that there are one or two factors at play here: There is insufficient refrigerant in the ...


0

My brother had the same problem with he's 2012 Nissan sunny (versa) all those you mentioned is been done until I found out that the Temperature selector cable is loose so this means its stocked and its no longer select from heating or cooling so maybe yours is on heating still because the cable is loose it wont go back to cooling, it doesn't matter what's ...


0

Stopped by a mechanic on my way home from work. The popping sound is the compressor clutch. The reason it's making noise is that the friction material is getting worn down, so you're hearing metal on metal when it's slapping together. It sounds little bit like air escaping (the PFFFT sound described earlier) because it's slipping a bit without the friction ...


1

Think about the long-term health of the air-conditioning system also. If the AC is used for long enough sans cabin filter, the fan blower will get clogged up with dirt and dust much faster. This can lead to issues related to low air flow, such as lack of cooling, a frozen evaporator and a frozen expansion valve.


8

Typically it's just a pollen filter that's more for occupants comfort. In older cars you would very occasionally get a dead bumble bee through a vent but I'd say that six days unfiltered shouldn't cause much of a problem for you.


1

In addition to the suggested insufficient refrigerant or debris, it could also be a pressure safety sensor going bad. That can cause the compressor to cycle on and off even if you have a full charge. Keep that in the back of your mind if it's not the other things.


2

The source of the pffft sound is the AC system's expansion valve. It is normal to hear it when the AC engages/disengages; it doesn't indicate that the expansion valve has an issue per se. However, what is not normal is that the AC is cycling on and off so frequently. 6-7 seconds tells me that something is disengaging the compressor clutch. This could be ...


1

You said ... " When we first started noticing a problem with the air it would only work if we were driving fast like on the freeway." Is this still the case? When you turn on the a/c does the engine's fan engage as well? If not, the refrigerant is not properly cooling off in the condenser. If this is the case, it is simple and free to figure out if this ...


1

I have seen this on a VW Passat. The problem in that case was a malfunctioning condenser fan. In cooler weather ambient temperature and air flow provided sufficient cooling to keep the high-side pressure within limits. At higher temperatures, there was not enough cooling, and the pressure went high enough to trip the high-pressure switch, at which point ...


1

@Paulster2 is spot on. The AC clutch has to be engaged in order to set the correct baseline for high-side/low-side refigerant pressure. I will add one point here that is often overlooked. The ideal thing to do is find out the mass of refrigerant that is required to fully charge the system, because that is really what the whole system is designed for. Here ...



Top 50 recent answers are included