Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Yes, you can remove it. Not knowing which engine you have in your vehicle, it's hard to tell you exactly what you'll need. Some engines, depending on the AC placement, will just require a shorter belt. Others will need a separate idler pulley which you put in place of the AC compressor. All it does it takes up the slack. Conversely, if you aren't too ...


0

If I'm understanding the question correctly, I don't think you have any major problems. The AC is going to drip water which has condensed on the evaporator core during use. This is completely normal. Since you can only cause this to happen with the AC on, I'd suggest you have one or two issues. This is directly related to the serpentine belt. Either the ...


2

If you have a complete donor car, it is by far easier to swap it out than to retrofit. If the donor car doesn't have an engine in it, level of difficulty goes up exponentially. This is due to not knowing where everything is/was/should be. Also, you'll be on an expedition in parts finding. You'd need to find the right AC compressor, lines, & pulleys which ...


2

If there is an Agila model with aircon, chances are most of the fittings are in place already (it's cheaper to have one common platform). It's quite a job actually though. Plus you'll need to install a new pulley belt. It's not impossible, but if you have the money and don't care about the learning experience, have someone else do it.


1

Since no pictures exist on the internet (that can be found) on where exactly the drain comes out at, hopefully this picture will help describe how you can help yourself figure this out: I found this video of a guy removing the AC box from an e46 330i. In the above circled area is the drain location on the AC box itself. This would correlate to the center ...


1

Water under the passenger side of the car is normal when running your A/C. The evaporator which is inside the car is located under the dash on the passenger side. When it cools the air, water condensates off of it, the water drips down into a catch basin, then goes through a tube which drains on that side of the car. What is not normal is that your A/C was ...


2

Short answer, ALL of the convienences mentioned above reduce the fuel economy of a car, any electircal system you use will affect the fuel economy,to understand why we must know how these systems are powerd exactly, its not as as you think. The battery operates when you start the car, the moment the car is started the , the power to run the electric ...


1

Because there are significantly more 6 cylinder engines in the E46 generation 3-series, I will make the assumption yours is a six cylinder variant. From experience, there isn't a huge number of differences between core components on things like AC between the 4-cylinder engines and 6-cylinder ones, but it's more likely things like the radiator and engine ...


0

You should be keying on it when the AC compressor is cycled on. Your 10PSI is way low no matter how you look at it. From the different videos I watched, I believe this one is probably about the best I've seen. It is quick and to the point. Basically, your AC pressure when the AC compressor is running should be between 25-45psi. This is going to vary by how ...


0

First thing to look for is remove the intake boot at the throttle body, and look at the throttle plate area. If there is black carbon around the throttle plate where it seats, clean it with carburetor cleaner. Put it back together and start the engine. It will be flooded so hold the throttle open until it starts and clears. The idle should start out being ...


0

In order to know if you want to put insulation on the pipeing, you need to understand a) the working of the AC (as Paluster2 explained) b) need to know which pipe you are talking about I believe you are talking about the return pipe from the evaporator to the compressor, because this is the pipe usually left uncovered or un-insulated as you mentioned. ...


5

I understand your concern, but you will not find a car coming from the manufacturer which has insulation around the piping. If you think about it, though, it makes sense and here are three reasons why you shouldn't worry about it: The cold side of the piping is after the evaporator, headed back to the compressor. Any loss here will not make a difference in ...


0

Yes ,You should insulate the piping of any air condition not only on your car but its a general rule that the piping from the compressor be insulated. This will not only prevent heat loss but this will also improve the life of the pipe itself. Will also prevent uneven coolant leaks in the future, even if it leaks with a proper insulation, the leak will be ...


0

This could be a case of ice formation near the expansion valve. After the compressor runs for a certain period of time, the freon flow would be choked and would resume after a while when the ice has melted away. Ice formation can occur if somehow moisture got introduced into the system. As an experiment to pin point the problem, you can have your AC blow ...



Top 50 recent answers are included