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3

AC systems are hermetically sealed, no way for water to intrude the system especially if the system has any charge at all. It could however damage the electrical part of the compressor (clutch magnet) or other parts of the AC electrical system like relays, wiring or switches.


1

It sounds a little odd but....it's possible The oil change has nothing to do with the AC compressor. So rule that out as a cause in your mind. The compressor could get damaged if underwater, it's possible. I will say I've driven my 4x4 truck through rivers where the water was going over the hood and my engine was almost completely submerged and did not ...


5

For the sake of having answers for questions, I agree with the comments, and believe this is just condensation coming from the air conditioner. You know how water collects on the outside of a cold glass when its warm outside? The same thing happens on the cold coil inside your AC system. Some cars just have a hole in the firewall that the water drains out ...


0

Yes its normal. Saw this bundle of water under the car. Frightened me initially. Its water due to condensation. Its nothing to worry.


0

It is not correct to assume that the problem is the blower motor before first checking Fuses The blower motor relay The blower motor resistor If all of these components are in working order then the next thing I would try would be the blower motor itself.


1

I suspect that you've filled the system correctly but that the additional stress places on the seals which were perhaps old, perished and slightly seeping have now, with the added pressure, failed completely and that the cloud you saw was the gas escaping at speed.


0

There is a product called BG Frig Fresh. It's made to eliminate mold and mildew from an AC. There is a drain under the car, spray in from there, or go backwards and tap a hole in the box under the dash. Then spray into the hole (where the heater core and evap hose meet).


2

I suggest using DampRid or similar desiccant. You essentially put a container, (usually supplied with the product) in the car in a inconspicuous spot. It pulls quite a bit of moisture from the air. This dries out the ducts and vents and will reduce mold build up. Don't put it in the vents. You put it under a seat, or in the truck depending on how your car ...


4

One trick that has worked well for me in preventing the musty smell is to turn the A/C off but leave the blower on about a minute or so before reaching your destination (if you are going to be parked for a while). It seems this allows accumulated moisture in the system to be removed before shutting the blower down.


6

You need to prevent the buildup of mildew in the system during the colder months, as that's what causes the smell. One trick I've heard is to make sure you run the A/C regularly (at least once every couple of weeks) during the cooler period, so that any spores get blown out of the ducts before they get a chance to settle and grow - a useful side effect is ...


5

There is no difference between brands of R134A, unless there is some additive in it which will be stated on the label. Some include leak sealer, never use this, ever. The only real difference is Price.


5

The A/C compressor in your car is like most (not all) A/C compressors every where else - they are single speed and don't have any adjustments. They are on or off. Changing the temperature knob or the fan speed will not decrease the load. The compressor is doing the same amount of work - you're just pushing less cool air around the cabin. At some point, ...


2

If the ECO mode is engaged on a Honda Civic the A/C won't be seriously cold. The Eco mode adjusts the A/C, the engine and transmission for maximum fuel economy. Disengage the ECO mode and A/C gets nice and chilly even at city speed. I own a 2012 Civic LX with 140,000km (87,000 miles) with no A/C issues whatsoever. The A/C system on a Honda Civic uses only ...


1

Sounds like a plenum (ventilation duct) fan bearing is slowly going bad based on the sound from underneath and behind the glove box.


0

Air conditioning cooling is calculated on the volume of air that needs cooling-A car interior is roughly about the size of an apartment bathroom . Most cars are about 1ton (12000Btu). SUV can range upwards of 20000 to 40000 Btu (1.5-3.0 ton). If you were have a 5 ton unit in your vehicle as one person claimed..passengers would have frostbite or be extremely ...


4

A/C systems that are run low on refrigerant fail faster than those that are kept full. This is because the refrigerant circulates to oil that lubricates the compressor. An un-lubricated compressor will wear out. So just after filling the oil will circulate normally but as the refrigerant level drops so will compressor lubrication. Also it is less than ideal ...


2

Personally, I recommend option #5.Refrigerant will cause frostbite in sufficient quantity. If you are unfamiliar with the principles of A/c you could damage the compressor. If you accidentally inhale you can be poisoned by it. You have to know which line to charge the system the vapor line or liquid line . If you do not know -Do not attempt it. Refrigerant ...


11

What issues can I run into trying to recharge my A/C refrigerant myself? The most common DIY problem is overfilling oil, under or overcharging refrigerant and installing the virus that are sealants. What equipment do I need to do it safely? Gloves and safety glasses. The PAG oil used is not good for humans and the gas can cause frostbite. ...



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