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27

This is a common problem for all air conditioners (in a car or not), and is caused by mildew growth. In cars it often happens when people run their A/C on the recirculation all of the time, or the drain gets clogged. The system doesn't dry out completely and mildew starts to grow. You should be concerned about your health, especially if you have allergies. ...


12

They are not even close in comparison. Your refrigerator is a small sealed unit that averages 488 BTU, the compressor speed is controlled to operate efficiently as possible, and is designed to operate in a controlled environment. According to electricity expert Michael Bluejay, the average refrigerator uses 488 BTUs per hour in normal use. Read more ...


10

The most likely cause is the a/c unit. What may have happened is that debris, pine needles,leaves etc may have plugged the drain allowing an excess amount of water to build up and then it relaesed. Run the a/c unit for awhile say 30 minutes. In a safe area like an empty parking lot make some abrubt turns at slow speeds. If you hear water sloshing under the ...


10

Not at all. You may be in some small way reducing the life of your starter, but this would be pretty negligible. When you start with the A/C switch on, you will be starting with the A/C Compressor clutch engaged, which means the starter must turn both the engine and the compressor; altogether a rather trivial amount of force in comparison to the force ...


9

Air Conditioners are run by a belt that is connected to the crankshaft. The engine turning causes the A/C Compressor to move. When your A/C is not turned on, a clutch disengages the A/C Compressor's internals from the pulley on the belt. This allows that belt to free spin, not adding load onto the engine. When the A/C is turned on, that clutch is engaged ...


7

As for the blower only working on max, that screams resistor pack. It's usually in the passenger foot well near the blower motor itself. Sounds like it's held in by two 8mm bolts in your case. Shouldn't be too terrible of a job, but you might want to avoid it if you've got back or neck problems. I usually put the seat back down as far as it will go and ...


6

Yes there is a problem with your cooling system. A car should now overheat in 85 degrees while parked. You will have to inspect your cooling system. Some things to check in order of most likely culprits: Your cooling fan. (Easy to check this one, once the car gets hot do you see the fan(s) on the back of the radiator turn on.) If your fluid low or do ...


6

I'm sure you could manage to measure the amount of energy wasted by your condenser fan, but I promise you it's statistically insignificant. If you're trying to save an amp or two or power, it would make more sense to make sure you don't have any lights on or that you're not carrying any heavy objects you don't need in your trunk. That said, the most ...


6

This is normal behavior. The A/C system is turned on to dehumidify the air, which causes the windshield to defog. Without it, your breath would freeze on the inside of the windshield and cause further issues. EDIT: Please note Bob Cross' comments below. I found instructions on the Honda Tech Forum which is supposed to give you full manual control over ...


6

It has to do with the type of compressor which is used. The system in a refrigerator/freezer has a completely closed unit, where the compressor is housed inside of the gas. Because of this, all the lines associated with it can be soldered shut with hard lines, etc. Because of this, a house refer/freezer will not cool as quickly, either. They work very well, ...


5

I assume that when you mentioned that the recharge only lasted for a month, that was until the a/c stopped working again? Usually a/c stops working when there is not enough pressure in the system due to it being low on refrigerant and given how long a non-leaking system normally lasts without a recharge, you've got a fairly substantial leak in a/c terms. ...


5

I got that exact same product! The hose didn't work very well. I ended up buying a separate hose for $15 or so, with brass fittings. Also, as Patrick said, a large amount of refrigerant solves a large refrigerant leak. And it won't solve it for long. So, I recommend either Go to the shop and get a leak test, and a refill if it's slow. Buy a quality hose ...


5

Basically you have an exhaust leak, it's dangerous (to you in the form of carbon monoxide) and should not be ignored. An easy way to check for the leak is to pull a vacuum line off the intake and suck a small amount (1 - 2oz) of transmission fluid into the intake via that vacuum line. Make sure the vehicle is outside, because it's going to smoke a lot. The ...


5

If you had the system repaired a ago I would bring it back. There is a chance that a component that was replaced is defective. There is also the possibility that you had a major leak that they found easily and now a small leak that may be more difficult to find. I would give the shop the benifit of trying to fix it for free before attempting anything by ...


5

It helps cool the air faster as it's taking the inside air (already partially cooled) and cooling it further rather than trying to cool the (often hotter) outside air. Obviously there's only a specific range where it works well. I've never noticed a fogging problem using it, but I only use it when it's of benefit...


5

Short answer it's not a DIY project. There are many things that need to be checked, specialized equipment, and a mistake can cost you a lot of money. It's against the law to work on AC without a licence in some areas, so check local laws and regulations. There are many reasons the AC is not cooling and a little low on refrigerant is one of them. Topping ...


5

There are several things that can keep the compressor from engaging the heater-A/C mode control switch the low pressure cycling clutch switch high pressure cut-off switch compressor clutch relay Powertrain Control Module (PCM). One of the most common problems is a low refrigerant charge, the low pressure switch prevents the AC clutch from engaging when ...


5

Unless the compressor is on a belt by itself, you don't want to remove the belt. Water pumps, alternators and power steering are nice things to have. An A/C delete/bypass pulley for your application would be a way to go, but it will involve pulling the compressor. Probably the easiest thing to do is locate the appropriate relay and pull it. If it's the ...


4

This product solves one main problem(symptom), low freon. The issue with this is that most cases of a car that have low freon is caused by a leak somewhere in the system. If your car suddenly stopped blowing cold air, then this will most likely not fix your problem. Your problem is probably one of two things: A/C Compressor died Large freon leak I ...


4

That sounds like condensation from moisture that's already in the system. It's not harmful but that slight smell could be the beginnings of mildew. You might want to dry out the system. The best way that I've heard of is to run the air through the recirculator with the heater on, trying the defrost, floor and vent settings. If you run hot dry air through ...


4

The blend air doors on the Windstar are vacuum controlled. The default position is defrost (windshield vents), meaning that if you loose vacuum supply it changes to defrost position. Look for a vacuum hose going through the firewall and trace it to where it hooks up to the intake manifold. It goes through a one way check valve and it teed into a vacuum ...


4

I would check the freon level, but it sounds like the compressor. In my truck when the A/C compressor started to go out that exact thing happened, the air would blow out warm and humid. The easiest thing to check first is to ensure that the A/C condenser fan is working. It is in front of the motor, it blows air across the smaller radiator that cools the ...


4

I have observed this - kind of like an acrid or "vinegar" smell. You can help prevent this by turning OFF the air conditioner a couple/few minutes prior to turning off the auto. As others said, it is caused by growth of biological bacteria/fungal and turning off early helps dry the system and assists in prevention as it reduces the moisture retained in the ...


4

If it were mine and I could get by with one to two charges a season (3 - 4 months) I wouldn't do anything but that, and I can fix it myself. Once it gets worse than that I would fix it. Get another shop to check it out, play dumb as if you don't already know. Because evaporator leaks can sometimes be tricky to diagnosis. Once more than one shop agrees it's ...


4

The compressor is a considerable load on your engine. In order to stop the engine from bogging the A/C usually has a way of raising the idle by letting more air past the throttle body. This function is where I think your problem lies. This can be a separate solenoid specific to the A/C system with a (fairly hefty) vacuum line to both before and after the ...


4

As stated in the comments, the legality depends on your location, as well as type of refrigerant used in the system. R-12 is only available to professionals, where as R-134a is available at your parts store. If for some reason that R-134a is not available in your area, that would be a good indication that it is illegal there. This is alot harder to answer ...


4

If it was never converted to use R134a instead of R12, you're not just going to be able to charge it up yourself, since something that old probably came from the factory with R12 refrigerant. You need a license to buy R12 in the United States, and it's not cheap. Since your system is compromised and needs attention anyway, you might as well do the R134a ...


4

You can visually verify if the compressor is running by watching the clutch engage and disengage with the climate controls set to A/C. If it's engaging and immediately dis-engaging on a warm day, the system is probably low on freon. If it's not coming on at all, you'll want to check the relay and the wiring. The relay is in the box on the driver's fender ...


4

It's best to repair it now if you can. Moisture is the enemy of an AC system and the moisture in the air is enough to cause a problem. This can cause corrosion on the inside of the components in the AC system. Causing you problems down the road. You also need a functioning AC system for the defroster to operate effectively. The AC compressor is run to ...


3

The only real problem I see is damage to the compressor. The system has oil in it that keeps the part lubricated, and leaks sometimes allow for oil to escape. If you are recharging, and not planing on repairing, ask where the oil level indicator is. Ensuring that the system has oil is the key, because as the freon escapes air replaces it, so you are always ...



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