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44

This is a common problem for all air conditioners (in a car or not), and is caused by mildew growth. In cars it often happens when people run their A/C on the recirculation all of the time, or the drain gets clogged. The system doesn't dry out completely and mildew starts to grow. You should be concerned about your health, especially if you have allergies. ...


16

They are not even close in comparison. Your refrigerator is a small sealed unit that averages 488 BTU, the compressor speed is controlled to operate efficiently as possible, and is designed to operate in a controlled environment. According to electricity expert Michael Bluejay, the average refrigerator uses 488 BTUs per hour in normal use. Read more ...


13

The most likely cause is the a/c unit. What may have happened is that debris, pine needles,leaves etc may have plugged the drain allowing an excess amount of water to build up and then it relaesed. Run the a/c unit for awhile say 30 minutes. In a safe area like an empty parking lot make some abrubt turns at slow speeds. If you hear water sloshing under the ...


12

Not at all. You may be in some small way reducing the life of your starter, but this would be pretty negligible. When you start with the A/C switch on, you will be starting with the A/C Compressor clutch engaged, which means the starter must turn both the engine and the compressor; altogether a rather trivial amount of force in comparison to the force ...


12

I can't give you numbers or calculations without some work, but I can tell you than energy is never free. Cars have an A/C compressor that is mechanically driven by the engine because this is the easiest way to get the job done in a typical consumer car. An A/C compressor actually takes a huge amount of energy to operate. In fact a central A/C unit for a ...


11

Air Conditioners are run by a belt that is connected to the crankshaft. The engine turning causes the A/C Compressor to move. When your A/C is not turned on, a clutch disengages the A/C Compressor's internals from the pulley on the belt. This allows that belt to free spin, not adding load onto the engine. When the A/C is turned on, that clutch is engaged ...


11

Basically you have an exhaust leak, it's dangerous (to you in the form of carbon monoxide) and should not be ignored. An easy way to check for the leak is to pull a vacuum line off the intake and suck a small amount (1 - 2oz) of transmission fluid into the intake via that vacuum line. Make sure the vehicle is outside, because it's going to smoke a lot. The ...


11

What issues can I run into trying to recharge my A/C refrigerant myself? The most common DIY problem is overfilling oil, under or overcharging refrigerant and installing the virus that are sealants. What equipment do I need to do it safely? Gloves and safety glasses. The PAG oil used is not good for humans and the gas can cause frostbite. ...


10

This is normal behavior. The A/C system is turned on to dehumidify the air, which causes the windshield to defog. Without it, your breath would freeze on the inside of the windshield and cause further issues. EDIT: Please note Bob Cross' comments below. I found instructions on the Honda Tech Forum which is supposed to give you full manual control over ...


9

Exhaust inside a car is bad. It can come in through your vents, through the floor, or through the firewall. No matter where it's coming from, you should get it fixed because you can pass out from carbon monoxide, and if the engine keeps running after the crash it could kill you. It probably won't take too much to fix -- the hard part is finding the air ...


9

Well, Teslas (and presumably other all-electric cars) have A/C so it's not impossible, but A/C takes a fair amount of power. On the other hand, Teslas store a lot of energy. The A/C is something like 2.4kW which is about 8,000 BTU/h or about 3HP. So using an electric motor on a conventional car might give you a few more HP briefly, but the alternator has ...


9

Cabin filters on modern cars use something called activated carbon (or at least some of them do) which is basically two paper / cotton sheets either side of a fine layer of carbon particles. It looks to me as though your cabin filter has a hole in it and therefore is blowing carbon all over the inside of the cabin. I'd take it back to wherever installed ...


8

I assume that when you mentioned that the recharge only lasted for a month, that was until the a/c stopped working again? Usually a/c stops working when there is not enough pressure in the system due to it being low on refrigerant and given how long a non-leaking system normally lasts without a recharge, you've got a fairly substantial leak in a/c terms. ...


8

I'm sure you could manage to measure the amount of energy wasted by your condenser fan, but I promise you it's statistically insignificant. If you're trying to save an amp or two or power, it would make more sense to make sure you don't have any lights on or that you're not carrying any heavy objects you don't need in your trunk. That said, the most ...


8

Short answer it's not a DIY project. There are many things that need to be checked, specialized equipment, and a mistake can cost you a lot of money. It's against the law to work on AC without a licence in some areas, so check local laws and regulations. There are many reasons the AC is not cooling and a little low on refrigerant is one of them. Topping ...


8

I understand your concern, but you will not find a car coming from the manufacturer which has insulation around the piping. If you think about it, though, it makes sense and here are three reasons why you shouldn't worry about it: The cold side of the piping is after the evaporator, headed back to the compressor. Any loss here will not make a difference in ...


8

Typically it's just a pollen filter that's more for occupants comfort. In older cars you would very occasionally get a dead bumble bee through a vent but I'd say that six days unfiltered shouldn't cause much of a problem for you.


8

The short answer to your question is no. As @JPhi1618 noted, the compressor is mechanically driven. Without the compressor you don't have any cooling. The AC runs by changing the state and pressure of a liquid, and compressing the liquid is a big part of that cycle. If you bolted an electric compressor onto the car you would have to find a way to switch ...


7

Yes there is a problem with your cooling system. A car should now overheat in 85 degrees while parked. You will have to inspect your cooling system. Some things to check in order of most likely culprits: Your cooling fan. (Easy to check this one, once the car gets hot do you see the fan(s) on the back of the radiator turn on.) If your fluid low or do ...


7

As for the blower only working on max, that screams resistor pack. It's usually in the passenger foot well near the blower motor itself. Sounds like it's held in by two 8mm bolts in your case. Shouldn't be too terrible of a job, but you might want to avoid it if you've got back or neck problems. I usually put the seat back down as far as it will go and ...


7

Sounds like the compressor is activating so you can rule out the Compressor Clutch and all associated electrical. Place the A/C on MAX A/C and the Blower Speed on MAX. Once this is done, go under the hood and you'll most likely notice that the Condesor Fans are not spinning as they should be. If this fan isn't working properly then the A/C will blow warm ...


7

This NIH (National Institutes of Health) Study monitoring CO inside the cabin of a vehicle during commutes over an extended period has some pretty interesting data. From the study the mean CO concentration was 9.8 ppm, with a standard deviation of 5.8 ppm Here is another study Here is another study that reflects older data ('80's and '90's) sampled ...


7

Cabin air filters will usually filter the air on either setting if located on the cabin side of the firewall. But even in recirculation mode, outside air will make its way in. Just be sure to replace it as frequently as your manual suggests. However, filters located under the hood at the air intake will not filter recirculated air. Edit: I decided to ...


7

For an A/C system to be functioning correctly, you need: In the cabin: something to exchange cold (an evaporator) something to move air over the evaporator (the fan) a working blend door that allows the user to select heat or cold In the engine compartment: something to exchange heat (a radiator) something to move air over the radiator (radiator fan) ...


6

I have observed this - kind of like an acrid or "vinegar" smell. You can help prevent this by turning OFF the air conditioner a couple/few minutes prior to turning off the auto. As others said, it is caused by growth of biological bacteria/fungal and turning off early helps dry the system and assists in prevention as it reduces the moisture retained in the ...


6

The blend air doors on the Windstar are vacuum controlled. The default position is defrost (windshield vents), meaning that if you loose vacuum supply it changes to defrost position. Look for a vacuum hose going through the firewall and trace it to where it hooks up to the intake manifold. It goes through a one way check valve and it teed into a vacuum ...


6

Since nobody even went to this realm, I thought it might be a good idea to answer. When driving the vehicle, the fans only provide as much air flow through the radiator as if you were moving ~35 mph (in most vehicles). Once you get past this speed, the fans are no longer a factor. Infact, in most cases, the air moving through the radiator is actually ...


6

There are several things that can keep the compressor from engaging the heater-A/C mode control switch the low pressure cycling clutch switch high pressure cut-off switch compressor clutch relay Powertrain Control Module (PCM). One of the most common problems is a low refrigerant charge, the low pressure switch prevents the AC clutch from engaging when ...


6

Unless the compressor is on a belt by itself, you don't want to remove the belt. Water pumps, alternators and power steering are nice things to have. An A/C delete/bypass pulley for your application would be a way to go, but it will involve pulling the compressor. Probably the easiest thing to do is locate the appropriate relay and pull it. If it's the ...


6

It has to do with the type of compressor which is used. The system in a refrigerator/freezer has a completely closed unit, where the compressor is housed inside of the gas. Because of this, all the lines associated with it can be soldered shut with hard lines, etc. Because of this, a house refer/freezer will not cool as quickly, either. They work very well, ...



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