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tl;dr: No. This sort of vehicle dynamics question best addressed by Racing Car Vehicle Dynamics What follows is a basic discussion at the high school physics level. As you will see from the reference text, high school physics is insufficient to statically model the complete vehicle system. A dynamic model is required to agree with easily obtainable ...


4

The ABS light can be triggered by metallic debris or dirt on the wheel sensor(s). The sensor tries to read the position of the nearby reluctor ring, but if it cannot then the ABS light will go on. It's also possible that one of the reluctor rings has broken or cracked, which would also cause an issue. I would check the sensors and rings first, before just ...


3

The newer the car the better ABS tends to be, but you can lock up even the best ones if you try hard. On sheet ice it is safer to disable your ABS entirely unless you have a system which is designed for these conditions. After seeing a bad crash where a long slide into a collision was caused by ABS not allowing any grip, I remove the fuse for ABS each ...


3

If you can get all 4 to lock at the same time then systems that detect differences between wheels won't activate. The system would have to be smart enough to detect exceptionally fast stopping of the wheels in order to work in that circumstance. My MR2 and Eclipse are definitely not that smart. Both are very capable of locking all 4 at the same time and ...


2

Preface I ended up doing a fair bit of thinking and research on this, so I figure I may as well write up what I found. Thanks all those who responded, particularly BobCross. In the end though, I wanted an answer that went beyond calling a car a mystery box on balloons - I asked this question because I actually want to understand it. Intro - Tires Given ...


2

The first step is to pull the ABS codes. That will give us a starting point for trouble shooting. This model supports flash codes, you will need to jump across terminal A and H of the ALDL connector (under the drivers side of the dash). It may take about 30 seconds before the ABS light starts flashing codes. Count the flashes to get the code, they ...


2

Turns out that there was a big pocket of air in the system. Sucking it out made everything return back to normal, thankfully. I also tried to replicate what happened in the first place by driving on some ice and getting the tires to lock up and activate the ABS. I did it a bunch of times and nothing bad happened. So hopefully it is fixed.


1

The ABS system is in effect an add-on to the vehicles brake system. You found this to be the case when you removed the fuse and normal braking was present. The ABS system has a module to control the sequence of solonoid operated valves which apply and release the brakes according to the performance of the ABS wheel sensors against a performance map stored in ...


1

There is not an industry wide problem with ABS brakes. The one problem that does arise is when an ABS system is 'opened' for any reason. Air can and will get into the system. The best way to bleed ABS brakes is with a pressure bleeder and a bi-directional scanner so that the ABS pump can be operated.This ensures the system accumalators are all bleed fully by ...


1

The ABS diagnostic port is under the hood, in the same assembly as the OBD port. I have never been able to get information from it, however. The best instructions I've been able to find did not work when I tried them. I asked a question about this previously, but so far it does not have an answer: Reading ABS diagnostic codes on a Volvo 940


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The first thing you should do is check for a blown fuse, it's very easy to blow a fuse when taking a battery out or installing a new battery. There is an ABS sensor near each of your four wheels, if one has gone bad or is disconnected, that will cause your ABS light to stay on. It's a 1992, so the garage may have to forego using any diagnostic readers and ...



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