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12

tl;dr: No. This sort of vehicle dynamics question best addressed by Racing Car Vehicle Dynamics What follows is a basic discussion at the high school physics level. As you will see from the reference text, high school physics is insufficient to statically model the complete vehicle system. A dynamic model is required to agree with easily obtainable ...


10

Normal Sounds The sound you are hearing is the ABS releasing pressure within the system to allow the wheels to continue to rotate and not lock up when you apply the brakes in low friction conditions. As the snow builds up and you encounter low friction driving conditions due to snow and ice the ABS will kick in more frequently because you are encountering ...


6

Sounds to me like the technician didn't burnish (or seat) the brake pads. Anytime you replace the brakes pads you should make several hard stops (not enough to activate the ABS) from 35 and then 55 mph. This seats the pads to the rotors, and eliminates the spongy feeling.


4

Turns out that there was a big pocket of air in the system. Sucking it out made everything return back to normal, thankfully. I also tried to replicate what happened in the first place by driving on some ice and getting the tires to lock up and activate the ABS. I did it a bunch of times and nothing bad happened. So hopefully it is fixed.


4

The newer the car the better ABS tends to be, but you can lock up even the best ones if you try hard. On sheet ice it is safer to disable your ABS entirely unless you have a system which is designed for these conditions. After seeing a bad crash where a long slide into a collision was caused by ABS not allowing any grip, I remove the fuse for ABS each ...


4

If you can get all 4 to lock at the same time then systems that detect differences between wheels won't activate. The system would have to be smart enough to detect exceptionally fast stopping of the wheels in order to work in that circumstance. My MR2 and Eclipse are definitely not that smart. Both are very capable of locking all 4 at the same time and ...


4

The ABS light can be triggered by metallic debris or dirt on the wheel sensor(s). The sensor tries to read the position of the nearby reluctor ring, but if it cannot then the ABS light will go on. It's also possible that one of the reluctor rings has broken or cracked, which would also cause an issue. I would check the sensors and rings first, before just ...


4

ABS (should) allow for the best stopping traction you can get (in a perfect world) on the road surface regardless of road conditions. That said, you see some caveats in the mix there. I'll try to explain. I say should allow for the best. All ABS systems are not created equal. Some work better than others (though I'm not going to break those out). ABS ...


4

It appears that as soon as the vehicle detects a wheel has locked up, the ABS goes into failure mode. This would suggest to me that you may have a fault in the abs module. If it was a wheel bearing or sensor that was at fault, I would expect occasional false activation of the ABS and also normal activation where the pedal judders. It looks instead like ...


4

The ABS light is an indicator of an error caught by the ECU. It usually is an error for a defective ABS sensor or a related brake issue. It's difficult to tell what exactly it is without reading the error code. Some specific problem might be fixed by reprogramming the ABS module, others won't. Depends on the issue and the year of your 528i. Once you get the ...


3

A problem with the anti-lock braking system will not have caused the issue you are describing. What you are describing can be attributed to about one of two things (or a combination of the two): Driver inexperience in a rear-wheel drive vehicle. Since the vehicle is rear-wheel drive, it will want to kick out faster than a front wheel drive vehicle will. ...


3

You are right to assume that error codes 41/42 are due to a lack of signal coming from the rear right wheel speed sensor. I recently had to address a couple of bad ones on my E39 BMW; the signal wire(s) may be brittle or cut so that signal transmission is no longer possible. I wouldn't worry too much about error code 95 at this point in time. The CAN bus is ...


3

It could be noted that the heads of the sensors get stuck with metal flakes from the brakes wearing down. That has caused a few BMW's we have had through my shop to throw those codes, we cleaned the sensor first and reset the codes as an option for customers. Its an option if you can't get the sensors in a timely fashion.


3

Seems like a bad brake caliper piston. When they start to go bad they tend to "stick". Sticking means that the piston inside the caliper is not freely sliding in and out when pressing against the brake pads. The sound you hear could be the caliper freeing itself from the stuck position. The springs sound could also be related because your car uses metal ...


3

It sounds it could be one of two things: Easier fix - PIT-5171 - Debris is preventing the speed sensors from reporting correctly. To diagnose this problem, remove the fuse for the ABS/TCS system and see if the problem persists. If that eliminates the problem, reconnect the fuse and clean the speed sensors with a toothbrush and an electronics cleaner. ...


2

In order to replace all of the brake fluid in an ABS system I always use a pneumatic fluid excavation tool. Here is an image. Honestly, I use this regardless of ABS or not. It will create a vacuum at the caliper and the fluid will enter a waste container. If you use clear tubes you can see if it's pulling air out of the system as well. You continue ...


2

Factory service manuals are usually expensive and they assume you already know how to fix motorcycles and have a full set of tools and equipment. But they cover every part of the bike and have great drawings. Clymer and Haynes make DIY maintenance manuals for just about everything, including your bike. Try http://www.clymer.com/Book.aspx?bid=1233 Be sure to ...


2

The first step is to pull the ABS codes. That will give us a starting point for trouble shooting. This model supports flash codes, you will need to jump across terminal A and H of the ALDL connector (under the drivers side of the dash). It may take about 30 seconds before the ABS light starts flashing codes. Count the flashes to get the code, they ...


2

The ABS diagnostic port is under the hood, in the same assembly as the OBD port. I have never been able to get information from it, however. The best instructions I've been able to find did not work when I tried them. I asked a question about this previously, but so far it does not have an answer: Reading ABS diagnostic codes on a Volvo 940


2

The first thing you should do is check for a blown fuse, it's very easy to blow a fuse when taking a battery out or installing a new battery. There is an ABS sensor near each of your four wheels, if one has gone bad or is disconnected, that will cause your ABS light to stay on. It's a 1992, so the garage may have to forego using any diagnostic readers and ...


2

1) Since my ABS light isn't on on my dash, can I safely assume that it's fine as-is, or is this something that will likely come back to bite me later on? Yes. If the sensor was not picking up the signal, you won't see it at first (after the self diagnostics are done, that is). Once you start driving, the computer will notice the differential and then turn ...


2

Preface I ended up doing a fair bit of thinking and research on this, so I figure I may as well write up what I found. Thanks all those who responded, particularly BobCross. In the end though, I wanted an answer that went beyond calling a car a mystery box on balloons - I asked this question because I actually want to understand it. Intro - Tires Given ...


2

If there is enough of a variance in tire diameter, it could most definitely be the problem. If the front tires are registering one speed and the rear tires are registering another speed, the difference could be causing the ABS computer to have fits. The difference would need to be a bit though, but don't know exactly what the difference would be (is probably ...


2

To answer these questions: Is there any substance to these scientific sounding claims? Yes there is and there is not, these kits simply reduce the total pressure applied onto the brakes by the user and are exactly not "ABS" or Anti-Lock Brakes. Is there any supporting evidence proving/debunking the above? I cannot Give hard evidence but these rudimentary ...


2

My guess on how the system works is explained in the picture. in normal condition, the flow of the brake fluid is shown using the pink arrows. during the locking condition, the spike in hydraulic pressure pushes the spool valve against the spring force(green arrow) opening the chamber that stores some of the brake fluid, thus relieving the pressure at the ...


2

I don't think it's possible to recalibrate the systems for a different tire size, but it shouldn't be necessary for such a small change. Most emergency spare tires are smaller than the standard vehicle tires and they don't hurt anything. That said, be careful if your vehicle has a limited-slip differential or all-wheel drive, those can be damaged if you have ...


2

With the limited info available it sounds like the ABS pump running. I can't think of anything else that cycles that fast. Why it would be running at start up I haven't a clue. You could try pulling the ABS fuse and see if the noise stops.


2

There is a recall of your vehicle for the BCM (Body Control Module) which is a type of ECU. This effects your traction control and cruise control as well as brakes according to this NTSB recall link. Recall Link for Your Vehicle SUMMARY: General Motors LLC (GM) is recalling certain model year 2004-2012 Chevrolet Malibu vehicles manufactured May 16,...


2

Typically if the car you drive was available with ABS and you are able to locate a car otherwise identical to yours at a scrap yard then the cost will be considerably less than ordering the parts new. However, only if you have the tools available, somewhere to do the work and the skills needed would you be able to make the conversion economically viable. ...


2

More than likely the sound the car is making is the wheel bearing or the rotor hitting, torque spec for the front axle nut is 158 ft.lbs. The C1422 probably occurred from a low voltage situation and the sensor needs to be re-calibrated. C1413 is probably due to the axle nut being loose.



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