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My 2006 Jetta every so often will slow drastically down or sometimes totally stall when I try to accelerate, especially on hills. It also makes a loud vrooooom sound. The dial to the left of the speedometer (I think it's the RPM?) goes all the way to the right, but the car isn't moving. It usually happens for a couple seconds, then I'm able to accelerate out of it. A few mechanics have looked at it and claim nothing is wrong with it. One mechanic checked the transmission fluid and said there is enough fluid, but that it's dirty and that may be causing the problem. I'm not convinced that would cause this.

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The loud vrooom sound is you revving the engine, as evidenced by the tachometer (RPM) going all the way to the right. This isn't so great for the engine without a rev limiter. I would advise lifting your foot from the accelerator prior to the tachometer reaching above 6000 RPM to avoid potential engine damage. –  GreaseMonkey Oct 7 '13 at 14:00
    
@FriendlyGreasemonkey, you say "without a rev limiter," but this car certainly has a rev limiter. Nonetheless, good advice to let off the accelerator. –  mac Oct 7 '13 at 15:40
    
When you say "totally stall," you mean the engine stops running and you need to use the key to restart the car? –  mac Oct 7 '13 at 15:41
    
This is an automatic transmission, correct? –  Drake Clarris Oct 8 '13 at 15:07

1 Answer 1

This sounds like a bad transmission. There are a few things that can cause this in an automatic transmission (though I hate them and stick with manuals, so I'm no pro on the auto trans):

  • The Torque Converter is the 'fluid based automatic equivalent' of the clutch, and if this slips, just like a bad clutch, your engine will rev free (showing up in the tachometer) without you going anywhere. It also determines the 'stall point', the point under which the engine disconnects from the wheels.
  • The transmission will also contain multiple clutches / bands, and if one is slipping or sticking that could cause this issue as well
  • In theory, these pieces are all controlled electronically so your transmission computer/electronics system could be faulty, too; though I highly doubt it's that (unless the other two check out or you replace the transmission and have the same issues)
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