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I have a craftsman riding lawnmower. It has a manual gear that I have to push up to get the blade to start. There is a physical heavy gauge wire going from this gear to something below that snapped in half. So what is this called, can I fix it myself, and how do you fix it?

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This question appears to be off-topic because it is about repairing equipment which I assume is not on topic here. –  xiaohouzi79 Jun 27 '13 at 6:39
    
FYI, since this is gathering close votes, I asked about migrating it to Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair. Will let you know what I hear. –  Niall C. Jul 6 '13 at 17:06
    
These questions are welcome here, see this meta post for more info –  Larry Jul 13 '13 at 17:16
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migrated from gardening.stackexchange.com Jul 12 '13 at 22:41

This question came from our site for gardeners and landscapers.

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There was a simple cable that rusted and snapped from the "clutch" assembly. I put clutch in quotes because this just starts the blade.

You cannot really just replace the metal cable because it is closed on both ends and has a mechanism on one side that it needs to be outside of... So a $3 fix turned to $27 because I had to buy the whole assembly. I did try to put my own metal chord and cap (and I was 98% sure it wouldn't work but it was free because I had the stuff) and the tension snapped the cap off like a twig.

This seems to be a very very common problem because for my model at a local sears parts center they only had 5-6 parts in stock and about 10 of the clutch assembly... So their design flaw is their profit.

The fix was simple. Take out the gas tank (2 screws), take out the assembly that moves the blade into gear (4 screws next to steering wheel), put the top part into the matching parts of the blade gear assembly, and then route it through one hole and then put the spring on the bolt and clip it. Always good to take a pictures but this was a pretty easy fix.

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You visit http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/index.action and type in your model number. You select the schematic that contains your broken part and order a new one. While viewing the schematic, you could be able to decide if you're capable of doing the repair.

I'm assuming since you're considering the fix, that you have access to a variety of tools and not just a simple, 20 piece, car-trunk variety socket and ratchet set. You could possibly need torx sockets, allen head sockets, large 1/2 inch drive sockets... its hard to say for sure.

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Thanks for your help Randy but even with limited repair skills I already did everything in your answer - which doesn't answer any of my questions. –  DMoore Jun 24 '13 at 5:32
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Your question "What is this called" can be answered by a list of parts on partsdirect. "can I fix it myself?" How can anyone know that? "How do I fix it?", we don't even know what it is. Moreover, this is more of a mechanical question than a gardening question. If this sort of question is allowed, I should ask what the broken do-hickey on my craftsman snowblower is. My advice is sound to anyone looking to fix their mower. It shouldn't be down voted. –  Randy Jun 24 '13 at 6:27
    
I thought I gave a pretty good description of what it is - if you don't know what it is then ask me a question to help figure it out. I think a person who works on riding lawn mowers would probably understand what this part is. –  DMoore Jun 24 '13 at 16:21
    
I work on mowers. I fix lots of small engines including mowers, atvs, whatever. I'm the go-to guy on forums.atvconnection.com for suzuki quadsport engines and have over 5000 posts there. That said, there are 1000s of different craftsman mowers in existence and there is simply no way to identify "something below that is snapped in half" from such little info. You said you viewed the schematics, then you should know the name of the thing which is broken in half. –  Randy Jun 25 '13 at 1:49
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