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The electric power steering pump in our 2006 Ford Focus 1.8 TDCi 5 Door Hatchback (this is a UK car) has failed and I plan to replace this myself. The part in question looks like this:

enter image description here

According to the local Ford garage, when this part is replaced they have to read some data from a control unit on the broken pump then copy it to the new "blank pump". The chap on the phone euphemistically called it a "suck and blow" part.

This sounded quite unlikely, and has the smell of making the job sound more complex than it actually is thus ensuring Ford get my business.

Upon making further enquiries elsewhere, I am told that the pump is not in fact re-programmed in any way, but that the "re-programming" is simply to reset the fault light in the engine management system once the part is replaced.

Can anyone shed any light on the real truth of the matter here?

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Not familiar with this part in particular, but it is a common theme with Ford. –  Drake Clarris Dec 19 '12 at 16:15
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If replacing the power steering pump triggers a fault code, all you need is one of these to reset it:

http://www.amazon.com/Autel-MaxiScan-MS509-Scanner-vehicles/dp/B0056VHZD8/ref=sr_1_2?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1355944663&sr=1-2&keywords=EOBD+reader

Someone can feel free to come along and prove me wrong here because I'm not 100% sure how things are across the pond, but claiming that you need to program a pump is a tall tail if you ask me, I think the chap was trying to trick you into parting with your hard earned cash.

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We asked another Ford dealer and he confirmed that the other dealer's story was embellished hogwash. The only so called "programming" that goes on is indeed just to reset the fault status in the engine management system. –  Kev Dec 28 '12 at 23:36
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