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I live in a hot, dry climate (Arizona, if anyone cares). It is very common in the summer for it to get over 110 F (That's 43 C for those of you metric buffs), usually having tens of days a year over that, as well as many more days over 100 F (38C).

What should I do differently as a result of living where I live in terms of car maintenance? Is there some particular things which might not do as well that I should keep an eye on?

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  • Tint your windows and put a Sunshade in the windshield when you park. The interior of your car will last longer and not fade out as quickly.

  • Keep your antifreeze at the correct concentration it raises the boiling point of water as well as lowering the freezing point

  • Keep the grill and radiator clean of bugs and other debris for maximum airflow, this will help your engine and your air conditioner.

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don't forget fuel - you don't want to skimp on the correct octane in hot weather. –  Bob Cross Mar 25 '11 at 19:37
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Keep a close eye on your hoses and seals. We've had some issues with hoses drying out (we are in the high desert in California) in cars that live outside.

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what Larry said, plus -

  • Keep your paint waxed/treated as the UV and heat/sun will burn the finish and the wax off faster. If you are in an area of the state where the wind blows, the sand will add to that as well.
  • Park in the shade as much as you can (have a garage or carport?).
  • Trend toward use of heavier motor oil (usually there is a listed range for a car in the owners manual), especially in the warmer months
  • Keep the battery well maintained - most sealed batteries are OK but there are still some not sealed ones out there - the low humidity will dry it out faster.
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