Take the 2-minute tour ×
Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for mechanics and DIY enthusiast owners of cars, trucks, and motorcycles. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a leaking pipe in the cooling system of my Mk Golf. It leaks about a litre in 5 miles. I'm not sure if it's worth trying Radweld with this rate of flow or if I should just try to find a replacement pipe.

The leaking pipe is the one which is oily at the right hand side of the shot, and wet in the centre. The leak is beneath the plastic clip.

enter image description here

Would you try Radweld with this amount of coolant loss? If not, what is this particular stretch of pipe called if I need to replace it? And why is there what appears to be a screw going through it? Is this standard for the clip?

share|improve this question
    
your link doesn't provide a photo - just a 'not found' page. But in any case, a litre in 5 miles is pretty far gone, so I would suggest you replace it! –  Rory Alsop Oct 12 '12 at 16:26
    
Sorry, forgot to set it to public. try again now! –  Miles Hayler Oct 12 '12 at 17:23
1  
Fixed the picture in the post –  Bob Cross Oct 14 '12 at 20:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

All sorted. As Timo said, there was loads of corrosion and Radweld wouldn't have stood a chance! The VAG part number is 037121065H. I initially got 037121065L but it didn't have a port for the heated inlet manifold!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the part number - thanks for leaving the answer for the next guy who has the exact same problem! –  Bob Cross Oct 14 '12 at 20:40
    
Good to hear you got it sorted! –  Timo Geusch Oct 14 '12 at 22:55

You can see the corrosion on the pipe around the clip - even if Radweld or similar is able to temporarily stop the leak, I doubt that it'll last very long. At the rate that it's leaking, there is bound to be a bunch of fairly sizeable holes corroded into the pipe. For that reason alone I would change out the pipe as soon as I could. If that breaks (worst case scenario) you're going to lose a lot of coolant very quickly and potentially cook the engine.

As to what the pipe is called, I couldn't find any online parts diagrams online during a quick search. Worst case I'd just take it to the dealer to get the part, it's going to be cheaper than a well cooked engine.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.