Take the 2-minute tour ×
Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for mechanics and DIY enthusiast owners of cars, trucks, and motorcycles. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Volvo 940 wagon, 1994 made for the US. Last night the driver's window stopping rolling up when I hit the switch, but it does roll down. I pulled out the switch box, and tried connecting the driver's window wires to the other windows' switches on the drivers controls (it has a switch for each door on the drivers side), but it still won't go up (I didn't bother to test if it still went down).

One interesting thing, maybe a red herring, is if I connect the passenger windows wires to the drivers side switch it won't roll up either. This happens using that switch and the switch on the passenger door. If I connect the passenger wires to a rear window switch there is no issue.

I was hoping I could purchase a new switch, but the fact that switching the driver's wires to a different switch doesn't work makes me wonder if a new switch will work. Though the fact the switch doesn't work with the passenger door either gives me a little hope. Perhaps the switch for the driver's window is unique.

Any ideas on a cause and fix?

(I haven't been able to disassemble the housing for the switches, but have only removed the plastic that holds the wires in place. If I need to remove the switch, which I assume will be necessary, pointers on doing this will help.)

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

It's very likely the switch: I've had to disassemble and clean the contacts (using a small wire brush and spray contact-cleaner) the window switch on 4 of my Volvos that are of similar age.

That's just my experience, but it's definitely where I'd start.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Any tips on getting the switches out? I've got the housing with the four switches out, but I'm not seeing a way to get the individual switches out without breaking the plastic. –  Rob Mosher Aug 1 '12 at 19:38
    
Best I remember, all four switches are on a single frame/assembly. You'll remove the bottom ... --I think it's a phenolic/circuit board but it's been a while -- and then you'll be looking at the mechanism and contacts for all four switches. –  Bob Aug 1 '12 at 19:42
    
+1, if the motor were dead it wouldn't go down. Plus, a lot of manufacturers run full current through the switches, which induces corrosion. –  Nick Aug 8 '12 at 4:50
add comment

Before investing in new switches, you might consider testing the wiring as well. Run your own, known-good wires from the switches to the window motor (this will require removing the interior trim from the door), and see what happens.

While you have the door apart, you could also try lubricating the window mechanism. It might just be sticking.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.