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I recently replaced the downstream O2 sensor in my Toyota Camry. Shortly thereafter, the check engine like came on again providing the following codes:

When it comes to making these types of repairs, I'm a novice but am interested in resolving these issues on my own if possible.

My two questions are:

  • Does anyone know if P1135 and P1155 are related?
  • If so, will replacing the O2 sensor resolve both codes?
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Can you tell us how this issue was resolved? I have a friend who's having P1135 on a 2002 Camry. –  R.. May 4 '13 at 2:50
    
It was indeed the air/fuel sensors. The thing is, you need to make sure that you get an AF sensor and not an O2 sensor. They are different and the former will clear the code, but the latter will not. –  Tom May 4 '13 at 17:44
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3 Answers

I have a 1st Generation (1995-1999) Toyota Avalon with a P1135 error also. I change the Denso Air Fuel Sensor P/N: 234-9007 and it solve the problem and the check engine light went away. I change it from the top instead of going under the car it was really easy. Hope this help like other have help me. Sensor Diagram

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P1135 Air/Fuel Sensor Heater Circuit Response (Bank 1 Sensor 1) is correct. I had the same code since 2010 until 2013. The day I changed O2 sensor 1 upstream for my 2001 Toyota Camry (4 cylinder, 2.2L) the code was cleaned, and then the engine light went away.

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Both codes look to be related.

P1135 Air/Fuel Sensor Heater Circuit Response (Bank 1 Sensor 1)

P1155 Air/Fuel Sensor Heater Circuit. (Bank 1 Sensor 2)

Source: http://www.engine-light-help.com

Replacing the sensor may fix the issue, but as pointed out in the answer to your previous question:

it is not always the sensor that goes bad. Sensors read the mixture and efficiency of your combustion, and can trigger a code if you are running rich/lean.

Source: http://mechanics.stackexchange.com/a/2880/1554

Some additional information:
http://www.justanswer.com/toyota/
http://wiki.answers.com

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