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I've got a 1995 Subaru Legacy Outback. I'm trying to get the best price for a clutch replacement and am putting together a list of all the necessary parts and prices.

Can someone give me a list of parts that I should expect to pay for?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To replace the clutch technically you only need a new clutch. However most people will purchase a Clutch Kit that will usually contain

  1. Clutch
  2. Pressure Plate
  3. Thrust/ Release Bearing
  4. Pilot/Spigot Bearing
  5. Alignment Tool

The last 2 items are not always included in a clutch kit and they are not always necessary, although an alignment tool does make life a little easier (technically this is a tool and not a 'part').
Depending on your location, Ebay can be a pretty good resource for getting a price estimate on whatever clutch parts you are looking for – you don’t have to buy from there, but at least you can get an idea what sort of prices are appropriate.

It is usually recommended that you get the flywheel machined also, this is a service you can get from most transmission places. Depending on the condition of your flywheel you can skip this part, but as I said it is the recommended practice.


Something to be aware of is that it is a non-trivial job to replace a clutch. It involves separating the gearbox from the engine because the clutch sits between the two, in order to do this one of those two items has to be removed from the vehicle, usually it’s the gearbox. Because of the amount of effort required to remove and subsequently refit a gearbox it is often appropriate to do other maintenance at the same time that can only be done when the gearbox is removed or is much easier accomplished when the gearbox is removed.

If you are paying a mechanic to do a clutch replacement then the cost of labour will greatly outweigh the cost of parts.
This makes a clutch replacement a great DIY job for a home mechanic because while it’s a time consuming job, it’s not a highly technical job and can be done with a fairly basic set of tools – the most specialised of which is probably a torque wrench. But if you are going to attempt to do a clutch replacement yourself for the first time, be aware that it’s a lot more complex than just changing your oil and spark plugs. Do your research, get hold of a workshop manual for your vehicle, read the clutch replacement section thoroughly. Also get someone else to give you a hand as it can be a tough job to do on your own.

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I've only ever had the first three listed items in a clutch kit. Alignment tools aren't that expensive though, and as you say, they're a reusable tool. –  Nick C Mar 6 '12 at 11:46
    
So, looking at AutoZone, would this be the only thing I'd need to buy (other than the alignment tool)? –  Matt Love Mar 6 '12 at 13:07
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@MattLove - changing a clutch is not a trivial job, it involves A LOT of work. Most of the cost of having a clutch replaced is in the labour not in the parts. Now if he's charging you $900+ just for parts then either he's replacing a lot of other stuff as well (which is a possibility) or he's ripping you off. –  Scott Mar 7 '12 at 5:17
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I just edited the answer to add extra info about the amount of work required to do a clutch replacement. –  Scott Mar 7 '12 at 5:38
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@MattLove take a look at the question I just posted here. Hopefully someone will answer to give you a better idea of what's fair and what isn't. –  Scott Mar 8 '12 at 0:43
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You'll need the clutch itself, as well as an alignment tool for installing. This is usually packaged with the clutch, however. Other than that, you can expect to pay to have the flywheel "turned" as well. It is feasible that you would need to purchase/install a new pressure plate, and some might suggest you go ahead and do so, with a vehicle that has that many years on it. My suggestion would be check the price of the pressure plate and weigh it against the cost of potentially having to get back in to install a new one after doing the clutch repair.

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