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1998 Dodge neon, it was like sitting in aeroplane and all light are going on and off, what could be the problem?

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Battery required depends on the car. True for all modern cars that I can think of, since the battery is in series with the electrical system to provide a "poor man's" filtering for the system. However, I can state that it is definitely NOT required in 1985 Pontiac Sunbirds, as we were able to push start and drive one that had no battery installed (and the -/+ battery leads were dangling loose/not connected)! :-) –  Brian Knoblauch Jul 31 '11 at 18:32
    
I would agree, probably modern cars do required battery for their computer to work properly otherwise it will malfunction. –  Dave Jul 31 '11 at 18:51
    
@Dave You should answer your own question, so it shows up as close. Accept your own answer as well. –  FossilizedCarlos Aug 6 '11 at 3:43

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Answer: They say once the car starts the battery is no longer needed but in fact it is! That is what I found after this experience. The battery terminal was loose so on the way battery got disconnected. As a result, the dashboard lights were going on and off during my 1 mile journey. I don't exactly remember how the engine was doing but it was scary. If you see a problem like this, check the battery connection. And yes battery is required even after you start your car. This is valid for newer cars 1998 onward. The older car might run ok as one comment says, since they don't have a computer.

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Can also happen when an alternator is going bad. I've gone through a number of alternators on my Mitsubishi Eclipse, and when they fail, the dash lights start doing all kinds of crazy things! –  Brian Knoblauch Aug 8 '11 at 12:09

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