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I'm looking into installing an auxiliary fuse panel in my car. Having researched what some others have done, I've been led towards a Cooper Bussmann 8 position ATC fuse panel. However, on their website, there are part numbers for a short base panel and a long base panel. So far, my internetfu has been unhelpful in determining what the distinction between the two is.

What is the difference between the short base and long base fuse panels?

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Here is the difference as far as I can tell. The "long base" has an additional power distribution portion. You can see it here in these two images.

Cooper Bussmann 15600-04-20 (short base):

Cooper Bussman 15600-04-20 short base

Cooper Bussmann 15600-04-21 (long base):

Cooper Bussman 15600-04-21 long base

These (obviously) are the four fuse block models. Eaton makes the Bussman to handle up to 20 fuses.

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Hmm, I'm not sure what the point of that additional power distribution portion is for. It doesn't appear to be linked to main part of the panel. But I am almost certain that I should be sticking with the short base variants for my needs. Thanks. –  Ellesedil Jun 24 at 13:38
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It's just a power distribution point. You'd use inline fuses to provide protection from it. It gives the user more flexibility with extra power points. Just make sure your power feed can handle the amount of power you're trying to draw from it ;-) If you are just using the Bussman as an additional fuse block, I wouldn't worry about it either and opt for the short base as well. –  Paulster2 Jun 24 at 14:03

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